Today at Berkeley Lab

ALS Provides Insight into Bitter-Pit Disease in Honeycrisp Apples

Why are Honeycrisp apples more prone to bitter- pit disorder? It’s an issue that has vexed fruit growers for some time. How to solve this culinary conundrum? Enter the Advanced Light Source. By scanning the fruit, researchers can compare the cell structure of Honeycrisp apples with other, healthier varieties. More>

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Tamura’s Ichthyosaur Illustration Used in News About Fossil Discovery

The ancient remains of a gigantic marine reptile known as an ichthyosaur have been discovered in England, and researchers recently published their findings about the fossil. The story was big news around the world, and accompanying some of the articles was an illustration created by Nobu Tamura, Wikipedia’s resident paleoartist and beamline scientist at the Advanced Light Source.

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Phase Diagram Leads the Way to Tailored Metamaterial Responses

With help from the Advanced Light Source, researchers have discovered an innovative way to independently control two optical responses in a metamaterial by utilizing the material’s phase diagram. This advance could lead to a paradigm shift in the design of metamaterial devices that manipulate light. More>

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Finding Order in Disorder Demonstrates a New State of Matter

Physicists identified a new state of matter with a structural order that operates by rules more aligned with quantum mechanics than standard thermodynamic theory. In a classical material called artificial spin ice, which in certain phases appears disordered, the material is actually ordered, but in a “topological” form. The Advanced Light Source was used for this research. More>

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Physicists Discover New Quantum Electronic Material

Physicists from MIT, Harvard University, and Berkeley Lab have for the first time produced a kagome metal — an electrically conducting crystal, made from layers of iron and tin atoms, with each atomic layer arranged in the repeating pattern of a kagome lattice. This kagome pattern — named for a Japanese basket weave — exhibits exotic, quantum behavior. More>

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Sugar-Coated Nanosheets Selectively Target Pathogens

Scientists have developed a process for creating ultrathin, self-assembling sheets of synthetic materials that can function like designer flypaper in selectively binding with viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens. The new platform could potentially be used to inactivate or detect pathogens. More>

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Major Breakthrough in Li-Ion Battery Research

Li-ion battery development relies on the chemical reaction of the active elements in the electrode’s materials. A promising new strategy uses an unconventional element typically believed to be inactive. In a recent paper, ETA’s Wei Tong and Bryan McCloskey, and Wanli Yang of the ALS, reveal experimental evidence to confirm the contribution of this unconventional element. More>

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Volunteer for Nuclear Science Day for Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts

The Nuclear Science Division, Advanced Light Source, and Workforce Development & Education are hosting the annual Nuclear Science Day for Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts on Saturday, May 5. Full and half-day assignments are available. All volunteers will receive a T-shirt, and full-day volunteers will have lunch provided. Register here to volunteer. More>

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COSMIC Impact: Next-Gen X-Ray Microscopy Platform Now Operational

COSMIC, a next-generation X-ray beamline now operating at Berkeley Lab, brings together a unique set of capabilities to measure the properties of materials at the nanoscale. It allows scientists to probe working batteries and other active chemical reactions, and to reveal new details about magnetism and correlated electronic materials. More>

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Deep Diamonds: Study Suggests Water May Exist in Earth’s Lower Mantle

A new study, which included experiments at Berkeley Lab, suggests that water may be more common than expected at extreme depths approaching 400 miles and possibly beyond – within Earth’s lower mantle. The study explored microscopic pockets of a trapped form of crystallized water molecules in a sampling of diamonds. More>

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