Today at Berkeley Lab

White House Seeks Input on New ‘Strategy for American Innovation’

The Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Economic Council request public comments to help guide the Administration’s efforts to support transformative American innovation and spur new fundamental discoveries that lead to growing economic prosperity and rising living standards. Deadline is Sept. 23. More>

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Science Haikus From Popular Science Readers

The beauty of supernovas, Schrodinger’s cat, and uncooperative assays are among the topics that were transposed into verse, as part of a call to readers of Popular Science Magazine. More>

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Vision-Correcting Display Makes Reading Glasses So Yesterday

What if computer screens had glasses instead of the people staring at the monitors? UC Berkeley computer and vision scientists are developing computer algorithms to compensate for an individual’s visual impairment, and creating vision-correcting displays. More>

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For Laser Inventor Charles Townes, a Festive 99th Birthday

UC Berkeley Nobelist Charles H. Townes drew a crowd of more than 500 admirers to Faculty Glade as the campus wished him a happy 99th birthday. Accompanied by his wife, Frances, 98, and his three daughters, Townes, the inventor of the laser, was presented with the Chancellor’s Citation. More>

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Sci-Am Editorial on Value of Investment by the U.S. Government

Last week, four science experts served as witnesses at U.S. Senate that considered the federal government’s role in R&D and STEM education and outreach. Google’s Vinton Cerf stated the value of the government’s investment “cannot be overstated.” More>

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NASA Ames Open House on Oct. 18; First in 17 Years

Celebrate center’s 75th anniversary with walking tour, science booths, talks, and food and drink. Tickets will be available starting Sept. 2. More>

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United Nations Hosts Big Data-Climate Change Challenge

Competition seeks data-driven evidence of economic dimensions of climate change. More>

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Americans More Worried About ‘Global Warming’ Than ‘Climate Change’

Yale research finds term associated with greater understanding and engagement. More>

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Particle Accelerators

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN laboratory has made its way into popular culture: Comedian John Stewart jokes about it on The Daily Show, character Sheldon Cooper dreams about it on The Big Bang Theory and fictional villains steal fictional antimatter from it in Angels & Demons. Despite their uptick in popularity, particle accelerators still have secrets to share. With input from scientists at laboratories and institutions worldwide, symmetry has compiled a list of 10 things you might not know about particle accelerators. More>

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Berkeley Lab Physicists Ahead of the Gravity Wave Curve

On Monday the BICEP2 collaboration led by Harvard’s John Kovac grabbed the brass ring: first detection of B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation, thus first evidence of primordial gravitational waves and first direct evidence of inflation. But the very first prediction of B-mode polarization and its implications for cosmology was made in 1996 by Uros Seljak, then a Harvard postdoc, now of Berkeley Lab’s Physics Division. Not long after, Adrian Lee of Physics conceived the essential instruments used by the high-resolution POLARBEAR experiment he leads (initiated by a Lab LDRD), also used by BICEP2 and other leading CMB telescopes. More>

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