Today at Berkeley Lab

Fill Out Your ‘Physics Madness’ Bracket to Determine the Top Machine

March is here, and that means one thing: brackets. We’ve matched up 16 of the coolest pieces of particle physics equipment that help scientists answer big questions about our universe. Your vote will decide this year’s favorite. The machines include such Lab collaborations as Daya Bay (pictured), IceCube, LUX, and LHC. More>

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Biomass Electricity With Carbon Capture Part of Zero-Carbon Future

A new UC Berkeley study shows that if biomass electricity production is combined with carbon capture and sequestration in the western United States, power generators could actually store more carbon than they emit and make a critical contribution to an overall zero-carbon future by the second half of the 21st century. More>

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Large Hadron Collider Gears Up for Restart

Since shutting down in early 2013, the LHC and its detectors have undergone a multitude of upgrades and repairs. When the particle accelerator restarts, it will collide protons at an unprecedented energy: 13 trillion electron volts. More>

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Abstract Art? No…It’s Wondrous Images From Microscopes

Scientific American hosted its annual Bioscapes competition, and the 2014 winners offer some beautiful images, from a fossil fern to fruit fly sperm. Pictured is microvasculature of a kidney. More>

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Mainstreaming Science in the Movies

Recently, mainstream Hollywood has been featuring more movies with scientists, engineers and mathematicians as the heroes, such as “Interstellar,” “The Theory of Everything,” and “The Imitation Game.” This got UC Berkeley student Alison Ong thinking about how STEM is portrayed in the movies. More>

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Nature Magazine Predicts 2015 Science Trends

Twenty Six billion hours of research, 920,000 publications, and one billion cups of coffee consumed are among the trends Nature has forecast for 2015. Go here to view an infographic that illustrates these and other predictions for the New Year.

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Large Hadron Collider Filled With Liquid Helium

The cryogenics team at CERN finished filling the eight curved sections of the LHC with liquid helium, and is now cooled to below minus 452 degrees Fahrenheit. The Lab’s Beate Heinemann said she is excited about the high-energy run starting in spring next year, which will open the possibility of finding new particles that are re just out of reach. More>

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How Would You Answer the Question ‘What is Sleep?’

The annual Flame Challenge, posed by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, seeks scientists to provide an answer that would be understood by the average 11-year-old child. The kids are invited to sign up their school classes to judge the scientists work. More>

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Retiring Rep. Rush Holt to Lead AAAS

The physicist, educator, and eight-term congressional Democratic has been named the new CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Holt has earned kudos from both Republicans and Democrats for being an effective, behind-the-scenes advocate for additional funding for research and science education. More>

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Lab’s Schlegel Weighs in on the Science of ‘Interstellar’

The new hit film features astronauts who take a wormhole ride to another galaxy to explore planets around a black hole. In this Q&A, cosmologist David Schlegel talks about the movie’s science and how Hollywood could learn from scientists about fantastic settings in outer space. More>

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