Today at Berkeley Lab

An Emerging Challenge to Science’s Credibility

A key feature of science is the ability to reproduce experiments, checking another group’s work by using its materials and following its methods then comparing the results. But worries have grown that many nonreproducible results are working their way into the scientific literature. Berkeley Lab life scientist Mina Bissell is quoted in the article. More>

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Take the DOE Solar IQ Test

Which state generate the most utility-scale solar power? Who discovered the photovoltaic effect? How many mirrors are used at the world’s largest solar power facility? Try to answer these and other inquiries to test your solar power knowledge. More>

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Wednesday Summer Fun Days at Lawrence Hall of Science

July 22 features high-flying stunts by the troupe Les Aerielles, who will perform aerial acrobatics, with performances at 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. The Big Bug Bonanza takes place on July 29. August events include Space: The Final Frontier, Real-Life Robotics, and Fizzy Foamy Science. More>

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Nobel Laureates Sign Declaration on Climate Change

At the recent Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Berkeley Lab physicists Saul Perlmutter, George Smoot, as well as Steve Chu (pictured), signed the Mainau Declaration 2015 on Climate Change. The declaration allows the laureates to “outline the scale of the threat of climate change, and…provide the best possible advice.” More>

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Popular Science Hosts Contest for Science Visualization

Once again, Popular Science has teamed up with the National Science Foundation to issue a challenge: Can you visualize a scientific idea, concept, or story in an arresting way? If so, submit your work to the 2016 Vizzies. More>

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Chien-Shiung Wu, Physicist Who Helped Change the World

As part of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, the Lab pays tribute to physicist Chien-Shiung Wu, who has been called “the First Lady of Physics,” the “Chinese Madame Curie,” and the “Queen of Nuclear Research.” Wu worked with Ernest O. Lawrence and Emilio Segrè in the early 1940s, then spent most of her career at Columbia University. More>

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Ten Things You Might Not Know About Antimatter

Antimatter is the stuff of science fiction. Star Trek’s starship Enterprise uses matter-antimatter annihilation propulsion for faster-than-light travel. But antimatter is also the stuff of reality. For example, antimatter is used in medicine, such as PET scans. Go here to learn nine other facts about antimatter.

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The U.S. and CERN Upgrade Their Relationship

The Department of Energy, National Science Foundation and CERN signed a cooperation agreement that lays the groundwork for continued joint research in particle physics and advanced computing both at CERN and in the United States. CERN houses the Large Hadron Collider, at which the Lab is involved in several experiments. More>

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U.S. Scientists Celebrate Restart of Large Hadron Collider

With the collider back in action, the more than 1,700 U.S. scientists who work on LHC experiments are prepared to join thousands of their international colleagues to study the highest-energy particle collisions ever achieved in the laboratory. More>

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Fill Out Your ‘Physics Madness’ Bracket to Determine the Top Machine

March is here, and that means one thing: brackets. We’ve matched up 16 of the coolest pieces of particle physics equipment that help scientists answer big questions about our universe. Your vote will decide this year’s favorite. The machines include such Lab collaborations as Daya Bay (pictured), IceCube, LUX, and LHC. More>

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