Today at Berkeley Lab

Chien-Shiung Wu, Physicist Who Helped Change the World

As part of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, the Lab pays tribute to physicist Chien-Shiung Wu, who has been called “the First Lady of Physics,” the “Chinese Madame Curie,” and the “Queen of Nuclear Research.” Wu worked with Ernest O. Lawrence and Emilio Segrè in the early 1940s, then spent most of her career at Columbia University. More>

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Ten Things You Might Not Know About Antimatter

Antimatter is the stuff of science fiction. Star Trek’s starship Enterprise uses matter-antimatter annihilation propulsion for faster-than-light travel. But antimatter is also the stuff of reality. For example, antimatter is used in medicine, such as PET scans. Go here to learn nine other facts about antimatter.

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The U.S. and CERN Upgrade Their Relationship

The Department of Energy, National Science Foundation and CERN signed a cooperation agreement that lays the groundwork for continued joint research in particle physics and advanced computing both at CERN and in the United States. CERN houses the Large Hadron Collider, at which the Lab is involved in several experiments. More>

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U.S. Scientists Celebrate Restart of Large Hadron Collider

With the collider back in action, the more than 1,700 U.S. scientists who work on LHC experiments are prepared to join thousands of their international colleagues to study the highest-energy particle collisions ever achieved in the laboratory. More>

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Fill Out Your ‘Physics Madness’ Bracket to Determine the Top Machine

March is here, and that means one thing: brackets. We’ve matched up 16 of the coolest pieces of particle physics equipment that help scientists answer big questions about our universe. Your vote will decide this year’s favorite. The machines include such Lab collaborations as Daya Bay (pictured), IceCube, LUX, and LHC. More>

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Biomass Electricity With Carbon Capture Part of Zero-Carbon Future

A new UC Berkeley study shows that if biomass electricity production is combined with carbon capture and sequestration in the western United States, power generators could actually store more carbon than they emit and make a critical contribution to an overall zero-carbon future by the second half of the 21st century. More>

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Large Hadron Collider Gears Up for Restart

Since shutting down in early 2013, the LHC and its detectors have undergone a multitude of upgrades and repairs. When the particle accelerator restarts, it will collide protons at an unprecedented energy: 13 trillion electron volts. More>

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Abstract Art? No…It’s Wondrous Images From Microscopes

Scientific American hosted its annual Bioscapes competition, and the 2014 winners offer some beautiful images, from a fossil fern to fruit fly sperm. Pictured is microvasculature of a kidney. More>

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Mainstreaming Science in the Movies

Recently, mainstream Hollywood has been featuring more movies with scientists, engineers and mathematicians as the heroes, such as “Interstellar,” “The Theory of Everything,” and “The Imitation Game.” This got UC Berkeley student Alison Ong thinking about how STEM is portrayed in the movies. More>

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Nature Magazine Predicts 2015 Science Trends

Twenty Six billion hours of research, 920,000 publications, and one billion cups of coffee consumed are among the trends Nature has forecast for 2015. Go here to view an infographic that illustrates these and other predictions for the New Year.

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