Today at Berkeley Lab

Did You Hear a Low-Flying Aircraft on Tuesday?

Those who happened to be at Lab on Tuesday afternoon most likely heard a very loud rumble overhead. Berkeleyside is reporting that the noise was caused by a Navy fighter jet. The pilot flew low as a greeting for his brother, who is a graduate student at UC Berkeley. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Scientists Set Quantum Speed Limit

Researchers, including Berkeley Lab chemical scientist K. Birgitta Whaley, have proved a fundamental relationship between energy and time that sets a “quantum speed limit” on processes ranging from quantum computing and tunneling to optical switching. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Early Stage Work Shows Graphene Could be Used as a Semiconductor

A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab materials scientist Lane Martin has found a way to control the movement and placement of electrons in graphene. The finding represents a significant step forward for graphene as an advanced substitute for silicon in semiconductors and integrated circuits. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

What Makes a Hit Song? ‘Hooktheory’ May Hold the Key

Materials scientists Chris Anderson, Ryan Miyakawa, and Dave Carlton (who recently left the Lab) have analyzed the chords and melodies to more than 1,300 sections of popular songs from countless genres and eras. Then, they sifted through the data for patterns and trends, hoping to develop tools allowing aspiring songwriters to follow suit. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Pre-Retirement Planning Workshops Start on Feb. 20

The UC Berkeley Retirement Center is hosting the series, which will cover such topics as long term care insurance, estate planning considerations, and maximizing retirement benefits. The program is geared for those planning to retire in one-to-five years. Registration is required. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Lab Hosts Kavli Symposium on Jan. 15 and 16

This inaugural gathering by the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute brings together noted researchers to explore the basic science of how to capture and channel energy on the molecular or nano-scale. Go here to read a roundtable discussion among Kavli researchers, including Director Alivisatos.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Old Photons, New Tricks

A much clearer picture of the history of the universe has emerged, thanks to innovative detection and analysis of the handful of photons arriving from outer space. “It’s amazing that we can piece out these stories from that little information,” says Berkeley Lab’s Saul Perlmutter. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Laser, Supercomputer Measure Speedy Electrons in Silicon

Mobile electrons are routed and switched through transistors, carrying information that characterizes our age. A research team has for the first time taken snapshots of this event using attosecond pulses of soft x-ray light then used the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center to better understand their findings. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Back to Future with Roman Architectural Concrete

UC Berkeley’s Marie Jackson led a key discovery at the Advanced Light Source about Roman architectural concrete that has stood the test of time for nearly two thousand years. Volcanic ash-lime mortar resistant to microcracking is the key to the longevity of the concrete, which was made from coarse chunks of volcanic tuff and brick. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Where Vision Meets Know-How: Xiang Zhang’s XLab

The Lab’s Materials Sciences Division director is featured in a UC Berkeley publication, in a story that highlights his work with more than 30 Ph.D. students, postdocs, and visiting scientists who comprise “XLab.” The X, says Zhang, stands for explore, experiment, and excellence. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.