Today at Berkeley Lab

Gut Bacteria’s Shocking Secret: They Produce Electricity

UC Berkeley scientists discovered that a common diarrhea-causing bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes, produces electricity using an entirely different technique from known electrogenic bacteria, and that hundreds of other bacterial species use this same process. The scientists worked with the Lab’s Caroline Ajo-Franklin on this research. More>

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Lab Shuttle and Skateboarder Collide on Sept. 12

According to Berkeley police, on Wednesday morning, Sept. 12, a man on a skateboard collided with a Berkeley Lab shuttle bus in Downtown Berkeley. The individual was taken to a local hospital and treated for injuries. The Lab’s Traffic and Pedestrian Safety policy offers ways to stay safe while walking, cycling, and driving at Berkeley Lab.

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Lab Materials Scientists Work to Concoct the Bluest Blue Ever Created

A group of UC Berkeley students, including the Lab’s Arunima Balan and Joseph Swabeck, are working with an artist-in-residence on campus to engineer a new pigment of blue, called “Quantum Blue.” The project offers the opportunity to introduce nanoscientific principles in an accessible way to a broader audience. “People can relate to art,” Balan says. “People cannot relate to quantum dots.” More>

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NSF Institute to Include Lab Physicists in Big Data R&D

With $25 million in funding, the National Science Foundation’s Institute for Research and Innovation in Software will develop systems to help manage the large amounts of data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As part of this effort, Lab physicist Heather Gray and other Lab scientists (in association with UC Berkeley) will focus on reconstructing the paths of particles produced in LHC experiments. More>

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Campus Hosts ‘Distinguished Lectures in Data Science’ Series

The Berkeley Institute for Data Science is hosting a data science lecture series that features faculty who conduct visionary research that illustrates the character of the ongoing data revolution. Among the speakers is Berkeley Lab’s Deb Agarwal, who will speak on “Tales From the Front Lines of Wrangling Earth Science Data” on Oct. 30. More>

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Long-Sought Carbon Structure Joins Graphene, Fullerene Family

The discovery of buckyballs delighted chemists in the 1980s, nanotubes jazzed physicists in the 1990s, and graphene charged materials scientists in the 2000s, but one nanoscale carbon structure – a negatively curved surface called a schwarzite – has eluded everyone. Until now, thanks to work by Berend Smit. Schwarzites are predicted to have unique electrical and storage properties for use as battery electrodes and catalysts. More>

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Wildfires Have Changed; The Technology to Fight Them Hasn’t — Yet

Technologies like drones and satellites can help pinpoint wildfires in their early stages, provide comprehensive overviews of those currently raging, and track containment. FUEGO (Fire Urgency Estimator in Geosynchronous Orbit) uses detectors to gather images, spatial data, results from simulations, and local weather, and turns it into intelligence “that’s actionable,” said the Lab’s Carl Pennypacker. More>

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Tying Electrons Down With Nanoribbons

Scientists cut a strip of graphene – less than one ten-thousandth the width of a human hair – and found it had new properties. This strip, known as a nanoribbon, could be a potential alternative to silicon semiconductors. The researchers in this study are with the Lab’s Materials Sciences Division. More>

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UC Berkeley Undergrad Move-In Days Are Aug. 13-14; Traffic Could Be Impacted

The majority of UC Berkeley’s incoming undergraduate students will be moving into the residence halls next Monday and Tuesday. About 5,500 incoming undergraduates and their families will be checking in and unloading cars. Traffic management is being used to minimize the impact. You can review the traffic circulation map for more information.

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Aug. 17 Aging Research and Technology Conference at UC Berkeley

The Center for Research and Education in Aging, which includes Berkeley Lab researchers, will host an Aug. 17 conference that will focus on aging research, technology, and investment prospects, and explore the pipeline that is being developed to support rejuvenation biotechnology. Go here for more information and to register.

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