Today at Berkeley Lab

Enhanced Microscopic Resolution for Improved Diagnostics

Simple, low-cost techniques developed by ALS affiliate Laura Waller are giving standard optical microscopes — and even smartphones — powerful new ways to see the minuscule. LED lights in a custom-built device boost resolution by making several microphotographs of a cell sample while changing only the angle of the lighting. More>

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Can Electric Bikes Kick-Start the Future of Transportation

“I think today we’re on the cusp of a second revolution,” ETA’s Marca Doeff predicted, as the steady gains in battery technology enable a shift into electrification on the roads. “I’m seeing it start to happen already,” she said. “We have choices now.” More>

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Moving Towards a Body-on-a-Chip

Scientists around the world — including materials scientist Anurag Mathur — are creating new drug-testing devices that put cells from human organs onto chips. The medical breakthroughs could greatly speed drug testing, reduce the use of laboratory animals, and allow for experiments that would be too risky for human volunteers. More>

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Lab Researchers to Aid Preservation of Native American Voices

This summer, Carl Haber and Earl Cornell are partnering with the UC Berkeley Linguistics Department and Libraries to start scanning and extracting sound from the 2700 wax cylinders stored in the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology that document the culture, language and music of dozens of Native American tribes from California. More>

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Botanical Garden Hosts Thursday Concerts This Summer

The shows, which feature a variety of music styles, run from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the newly remodeled stage and amphitheater in the garden’s Redwood Grove. Concerts run from June through August. Go here for complete schedule and ticket information.

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New Lawrence Hall of Science Exhibit on ‘Science Fiction, Science Future’

Move objects with your mind, become invisible, learn about teleportation, and even meet a robot or two! Science Fiction, Science Future brings the science of the future into the present. Experience hands-on and full-body activities as you discover that teleportation, holograms, and cyborgs are not just science fiction. More>

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Drug Perks Up Old Muscles and Aging Brains

Researchers — including physical bioscientist David Schaffer — have discovered that a small-molecule drug simultaneously perks up old stem cells in the brains and muscles of mice, a finding that could lead to drug interventions for humans that would make aging tissues throughout the body act young again. More>

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UC Berkeley Commencement Season Begins on May 15

Those who commute to and from work around the campus should be aware of additional car and pedestrian traffic created by the various department ceremonies, which continue through May 24. The main commencement event takes place on Saturday, May 16, in Memorial Stadium at 10 a.m. More>

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Seeing Through Alzheimer’s Disease

In battling Alzheimer’s, researchers — including Berkeley Lab’s William Jagust — have been limited to a single snapshot of the brain provided by an autopsy. The course and chronology of the damage are still up for grabs. But the ability to peer into the brains of people struggling with Alzheimer’s as well as seniors free of its grip is increasing. More>

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Using a Smartphone to Detect Parasites in Blood

A team led by physical bioscientist Daniel Fletcher has developed a new smartphone microscope called CellScope Loa, which uses video to detect and analyze parasitic worm infections in blood. The tool could help fight diseases in remote parts of the world. More>

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