Today at Berkeley Lab

New Lawrence Hall of Science Exhibit on ‘Science Fiction, Science Future’

Move objects with your mind, become invisible, learn about teleportation, and even meet a robot or two! Science Fiction, Science Future brings the science of the future into the present. Experience hands-on and full-body activities as you discover that teleportation, holograms, and cyborgs are not just science fiction. More>

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Drug Perks Up Old Muscles and Aging Brains

Researchers — including physical bioscientist David Schaffer — have discovered that a small-molecule drug simultaneously perks up old stem cells in the brains and muscles of mice, a finding that could lead to drug interventions for humans that would make aging tissues throughout the body act young again. More>

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UC Berkeley Commencement Season Begins on May 15

Those who commute to and from work around the campus should be aware of additional car and pedestrian traffic created by the various department ceremonies, which continue through May 24. The main commencement event takes place on Saturday, May 16, in Memorial Stadium at 10 a.m. More>

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Seeing Through Alzheimer’s Disease

In battling Alzheimer’s, researchers — including Berkeley Lab’s William Jagust — have been limited to a single snapshot of the brain provided by an autopsy. The course and chronology of the damage are still up for grabs. But the ability to peer into the brains of people struggling with Alzheimer’s as well as seniors free of its grip is increasing. More>

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Using a Smartphone to Detect Parasites in Blood

A team led by physical bioscientist Daniel Fletcher has developed a new smartphone microscope called CellScope Loa, which uses video to detect and analyze parasitic worm infections in blood. The tool could help fight diseases in remote parts of the world. More>

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Bioengineer Takes ‘Intelligent Design’ Approach to Viruses

Rather than trying to quiet the body’s defenses against viruses, physical bioscientist David Schaffer has favored a kind of “intelligent design” approach to modify the virus. Known as directed evolution, the strategy uses genetic engineering to find variations in the virus that will allow it to effectively deliver drugs to target cells. More>

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JBEI Promotes Bioenergy at Cal Day

On April 18 JBEI volunteers participated at Cal Day, UC Berkeley’s annual open house. Hosted by UC Berkeley’s Department of Plant & Microbial Biology, JBEI promoted bioenergy topics as well as internships and employment opportunities.

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BERC Hosts Roundtable on ‘Changing Lands in a Changing Climate’

Our lands provide food and resources in addition to acting as a carbon sink, making them one of the most important pieces of the climate change puzzle. The Berkeley Energy & Resources Collaborative is hosting a roundtable on this topic on Friday, April 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in downtown Go here for more information and to register.

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Cal Day is April 18

The campus’s annual open house features 300 lectures (several by Berkeley Lab researchers), demonstrations, tours, performances, and sports activities. More>

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Caution Urged in Using New DNA Editing Technology for Gene Therapy

A group of 18 scientists — including Berkeley Lab’s Jennifer Doudna — and ethicists warned that a revolutionary new tool to cut and splice DNA should be used cautiously when attempting to fix human genetic disease, and strongly discouraged any attempts at making changes to the human genome that could be passed on to offspring. More>

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