Today at Berkeley Lab

Modified Antibody Clarifies Tumor-Killing Mechanisms

At the Advanced Light Source, researchers studied an antibody that was modified to activate a specific pathway of the immune system, demonstrating its value in killing tumor cells. The work provides a platform for disentangling the effects of different immune-system pathways and could lead to the design of improved cancer immunotherapies. More>

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Solving the Dark Energy Mystery: A New Assignment for an Old Telescope

The dome has closed on the previous science chapters of the 4-meter Mayall Telescope in Arizona so that it can prepare for its new role in creating the largest 3-D map of the universe. This map could help to solve the mystery of dark energy, which is driving the accelerating expansion of the universe. More>

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Lab Report Calls for Industry Attention to Ensuring Grid Reliability

With changes in how electricity is being generated and consumed, the Lab has written a new report for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which analyzes challenges facing the nation’s electric grid and makes recommendations for ensuring continued reliability. “If we don’t pay attention to it, we could be in for an unpleasant surprise,” said lead author Joe Eto. More>

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Study Indicates Greater Capacity for Carbon Storage in the Subsurface

New research from the Energy Geosciences Division shows that carbon dioxide can penetrate the inner layers of some non-swelling clay minerals, which make up the dominant clays in the Earth’s deep subsurface. Results of the work could help inform practices intended to help limit carbon dioxide emissions. More>

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JGI Helps Determine the Citrus Ancestral Home

To defend citrus crops against Huanglongbing, a disease destroying whole orchards, researchers have begun employing genomics to better understand how citrus varieties respond to disease and other stresses. Joint Genome Institute scientists played a leading role in the international consortium that sequenced and analyzed the Clementine mandarin and sweet orange. More>

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EESA Scientists Study Next-Gen Electric Meters to Detect Seismic Risk

A research team led by Kurt Nihei of the Energy Geosciences Division has received funding through the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program to collaborate with Pacific Gas & Electric to evaluate the ability of next-generation electric meters to assess regional seismic risk. More>

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Let the Good Tubes Roll; New Technology Could Aid Water Purification

Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory designed a tube that rolls up and zips closed. The technology – inspired by protein structures called microtubules that reside in cells – could help with water filtration, tissue engineering, and other applications. The researchers used the Advanced Light Source and Molecular Foundry to characterize the tubes. More>

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Fuel From the Sun: ALS Provides Insight Into Electrode Performance

Soft X-ray studies of hematite electrodes – potentially key components in producing fuel from sunlight – revealed the material’s electronic band positions under realistic operating conditions. Clarifying the mechanisms limiting hematite’s photoelectrochemical performance brings researchers closer to converting solar energy into easily storable chemical fuel. More>

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New Crystallization Screen Reaches the Market

Protein crystals are the critical starting point for X-ray data collection and macromolecular structure determination. Bioscientists led by Paul Adams and Jose Henrique Pereira have developed a new crystallization screen with 96 conditions proven to be highly effective. The screen is now commercially available to the wider X-ray crystallography community. More>

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New Tracking Method Helps Understanding of Energy Flow in Photosynthesis

Harvesting energy from sunlight in synthetic organic semiconductors requires “exciton” energy to migrate to an interface where electronic charges are unleashed to generate electricity. Naomi Ginsberg of the Biosciences Area developed the most direct method to date to track this nanoscale process that occurs in the initial picoseconds after light absorption. More>

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