Today at Berkeley Lab

A 3D Map of the Adolescent Universe

Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see today. More>

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DESI Wins $1.1 Million Award

The Heising-Simons Foundation has awarded $1.1M to the DESI project with the goal of helping to fabricate the unique optics needed to capture spectra of the young expanding universe. The funding comes on the heels of DESI’s CD-1 review by the Department of Energy’s Office of Project Assessment, which in September favorably reviewed the project’s concept and budget range. More>

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Dispelling a Misconception About Mg-Ion Batteries

David Prendergast and Liwen Wan at the Molecular Foundry used supercomputer simulations to dispel a popular misconception about magnesium-ion batteries that should help advance the development of multivalent ion battery technology. More>

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ALS Progression Linked to Increased Protein Instability

A new study by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Berkeley Lab, and other institutions suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The study provides evidence that those proteins linked to more severe forms of the disease are less stable structurally and more prone to form clusters or aggregates. More>

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Microgrid Version of Distributed Energy Resource Software Now Available

A new version of the Lab’s Distributed Energy Resources – Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) is now available that incorporates new features for modeling microgrids. The model’s purpose is to minimize the cost of operating on-site generation and combined heat and power systems, either for individual customer sites or on a microgrid. More>

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Study Sheds New Light on Why Batteries Go Bad

A comprehensive look at how tiny particles in a lithium ion battery electrode behave shows that rapid-charging the battery and using it to do high-power, rapidly draining work may not be as damaging as researchers had thought – and that the benefits of slow draining and charging may have been overestimated. More>

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JGI’s 2015 Science Portfolio Delves Deeper into Earth’s Data Mine

A total of 32 projects were selected for the Joint Genome Institute’s 2015 Community Science Program, and they promote a shift in JGI’s emphasis from deciphering an organism’s genetic code to facilitating an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do. More>

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A Quick Look at Electron-Boson Coupling

Alessandra Lanzara and Wentao Zhang of the Materials Sciences Division used an ultrafast spectroscopy technique called trARPES to demonstrate a link between electron-boson coupling and high-temperature superconductivity in a high-Tc cuprate. More>

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Hot Plasma Soup at the Dawn of the Universe

By combining data from two high-energy accelerators, nuclear scientists have refined the measurement of a remarkable property of exotic matter known as quark-gluon plasma. The findings reveal new aspects of the ultra-hot, “perfect fluid” that give clues to the state of the young universe just microseconds after the big bang. More>

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RCas9: A Programmable RNA Editing Tool

Jennifer Doudna of the Physical Biosciences Division led a study that demonstrates that the CRISPR/Cas9 protein complex, a powerful scientific tool for editing DNA instructions, can also be applied to RNA. More>

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