Today at Berkeley Lab

Researchers Catch Extreme Waves with Higher Resolution Modeling

Resolution matters, particularly when it comes to producing accurate models of hurricanes and the extreme waves they generate. A new Berkeley Lab study shows that high-resolution simulations captured tropical cyclones and waves that low-resolution ones missed. Better extreme wave forecasts are important for coastal cities, the military, and the shipping industry. More>

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ALS Helps Reveal Two Basic Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Drugs

The structures of proteins controlling calcium-ion transport through cell membranes have been revealed, bound to two drugs known as calcium channel blockers. The discovery might accelerate the development of safer and more effective drugs for treating cardiovascular disorders such as high blood pressure, chest pain, and irregular heartbeat. More>

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Next-Gen Dark Matter Detector in a Race to Finish Line

The race is on to build the most sensitive U.S.-based experiment designed to directly detect dark matter particles. Department of Energy officials have formally approved a key construction milestone that will propel the project toward its April 2020 goal for completion. More>

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Doudna Awarded Japan Prize for Invention of CRISPR Gene Editing

Jennifer Doudna of the Biosciences Area will share the Japan Prize with Emmanuelle Charpentier for their invention of CRISPR-Cas9, a gene-editing technology that has led to new therapies for cancer and hereditary diseases. The honors will be presented at an award ceremony on April 19 in Tokyo. More>

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Proposals for JGI-NERSC Microbiome Data Science Call Due March 1

The call will enable users to perform state-of-the-art computational genomics and metagenomics research and help them translate sequence information generated by the JGI or elsewhere into biological discovery. The call aims to help users perform large-scale computational analyses of sequence data to solve DOE mission-relevant problems. More>

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A Chain Reaction to Spare the Air

Last year, materials scientist Jeff Long devised a new material that captures and releases CO2 at a lower temperature and in greater volume than current technologies. He’s now working to synthesize the new material at a large scale, to render it into pellet form, and confirm its increased CO2 capture performance under realistic conditions. More>

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Swiss Army Knife for Proteins: Major Advance in Manipulation of Biomolecules

Lab chemists have developed a powerful new method of selectively linking chemicals to proteins, a major advance in the manipulation of biomolecules that could transform the way drugs are developed, proteins are probed, and molecules are tracked and imaged. This technique, called ReACT, is akin to a chemical Swiss army knife for proteins. More>

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Simulations Reveal the Invisible Chaos of Superluminous Supernovae

To better understand the physical conditions that create superluminious supernova — stellar explosions that shine 10 to 100 times brighter than normal — astrophysicists are running two-dimensional simulations of these events using supercomputers at NERSC and the Berkeley Lab-developed CASTRO code. More>

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NSD’s Jacak Makes Case for a Next-Gen Particle Collider

Nuclear Science’s Barbara Jacak spoke at an American Physical Society meeting about a mysterious, frictionless fluid known as the quark gluon plasma, created by colliding the nuclei of heavy atoms. Data from these collisions suggests that other exotic conditions may produce droplets with similar properties, and a new type of particle collider could help discover how these plasmas form. More>

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A New Form of Matter Unveiled…Time Crystals

If crystals have an atomic structure that repeats in space, can they also have a structure that repeats in time? That is, a time crystal? In a recent study, Norman Yao (Materials Sciences) describes how to make and measure the properties of such a crystal, and even predicts what the various phases surrounding the time crystal should be, like the liquid and gas phases of ice. More>

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