Today at Berkeley Lab

Scientists Create Continuously Emitting Microlasers With Nanoparticle-Coated Beads

Researchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood serum. More>

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Shape-Shifters: Foundry Researchers Find Peptoids Unexpectedly Change Shape When Forming Nanosheets

Peptoids are artificial versions of nature’s peptides that can readily self-assemble into nanosheets. Recently, an international team of researchers led by Molecular Foundry scientists discovered that peptoids can change shape when they form a nanosheet. More>

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Carl Haber’s Project IRENE Helps Cal Student Rediscover Native American Heritage

Project IRENE, an audio digitization method invented by Lab physicist Carl Haber, made it possible for anthropologists to turn fragile wax cylinder recordings of Native American languages into digital sound archives — and for a UC Berkeley student to reconnect with his family and Native American culture. More>

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From Moon Rocks to Space Dust: Berkeley Lab’s Extraterrestrial Research

From moon rocks to meteorites, and from space dust to a dinosaur-destroying impact, the Department of Energy’s Berkeley Lab has a well-storied expertise in exploring samples of extraterrestrial origin. More>

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New Tool Created at Geosciences Measurement Facility Advances Geothermal Research

A new instrument developed at the Geosciences Measurement Facility by Yves Guglielmi and Paul Cook will help researchers working to identify ways to improve enhanced geothermal systems technologies. Go here to watch a video on the new instrument.

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Meet Leda: Mother of Light Is Also New ALS Insertion Device

In Greek mythology, Leda is a Spartan queen and mother of the twins Castor and Pollux. In reference to the myth, Leda is also the name of the ALS’s recently delivered insertion device — an in-vacuum undulator. For the next eight months, Leda is taking up residence in the Building 15 high bay, awaiting installation during the January 2019 shutdown. More>

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Tracing Interstellar Dust Back to Solar System’s Formation

Experiments conducted at Berkeley Lab helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles – collected from Earth’s upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets – contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system. Scientists from the University of Hawaii at Manoa used the Advanced Light Source and the Molecular Foundry for their research. More>

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Rational Optimization of Organic Solar-Cell Materials

With help from the Advanced Light Source, researchers have established a new quantitative model that connects molecular interactions in organic solar-cell materials to device performance. The work suggests a way to quickly identify ideal material mixtures and processing methods, bypassing trial-and-error strategies and minimizing labor-intensive synthesis. More>

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Exascale the Key to Generating Realistic and Accurate Scenarios of Future Earthquakes

In a recent podcast with the Exascale Computing Project, Berkeley Lab’s David McCallen discussed his work using computer simulation to understand the impact of earthquakes on major infrastructure. More>

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Non-Crystal Clarity: Scientists Find Ordered Magnetic Patterns in Disordered Magnetic Material

A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab has confirmed a special property known as “chirality” — which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way — in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure. More>

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