Today at Berkeley Lab

Possible Avenue to Better Electrolyte for Lithium Ion Batteries

Rich Saykally, David Prendergast, and Steve Harris, conducted the first X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of a model electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries. The results show a pathway forward to improving lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles and large-scale electrical energy storage. More>

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Switching to Spintronics

ALD for Energy Technologies Ramamoorthy Ramesh led a study in which the application of an electric field at room temperature reversed the magnetization direction in a multiferroic spintronic device. This points a new way towards spintronics and smaller, faster and cheaper methods of storing and processing data. More>

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Back to Future with Roman Architectural Concrete

UC Berkeley’s Marie Jackson led a key discovery at the Advanced Light Source about Roman architectural concrete that has stood the test of time for nearly two thousand years. Volcanic ash-lime mortar resistant to microcracking is the key to the longevity of the concrete, which was made from coarse chunks of volcanic tuff and brick. More>

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Air Pollution Down Thanks to California’s Regulation of Diesel Trucks

Ever wonder what’s in the black cloud that emits from some semi trucks that you pass on the freeway? EETD’s Thomas Kirchstetter knows precisely what’s in there, having conducted detailed measurements of thousands of heavy-duty trucks over months at a time at two the Port of Oakland and the Caldecott Tunnel. More>

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Mimicking Nature for Homeland Security

The Molecular Foundry’s Ron Zuckermann is designing two-dimensional peptoid nanosheets — a material made of biomimetic polymers, two molecules thick — that could one day be used to make sensors that detect lethal chemical agents or deadly viruses deployed during warfare or a terrorist attack. More>

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Mice Travel to Space for Study on Organ Development

The rodents will join the crew of the International Space Station to help scientists learn how space travel affects the immune system, organ development, and reproduction across generations. The mice are part of a NASA-funded Lab study that includes Janice Pluth, Antoine Snijders, Deepa Sridharan, and Jian-Hua Mao. More>

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World Record for Compact Particle Accelerator

Using one of the most powerful lasers in the world, Lab researchers have accelerated subatomic particles to the highest energies ever recorded. They used an emerging class of compact particle accelerator that physicists believe can shrink traditional, miles-long accelerators to machines that can fit on a table. More>

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Rickshaw Research Reveals Extreme Delhi Pollution

EETD postdoc Joshua Apte conducted an air-pollution monitoring project in the back of a three-wheeled rickshaw in New Delhi, and the findings are alarming. The numbers collected are significantly worse than the ones that already earned Delhi the World Health Organization’s designation as the world’s most polluted city. More>

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Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient combustion systems, have gotten their own efficiency boost, thanks to researchers from the Computational Research Division. More>

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A Better Look at the Chemistry of Interfaces

Materials scientist Chuck Fadley and chemical scientist Hendrik Bluhm developed a new X-ray spectroscopy technique called SWAPPS. This new technique provides sub-nanometer resolution of every chemical element found at heterogeneous interfaces, such as those in batteries, fuel cells and other devices. More>

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