Today at Berkeley Lab

Twisting 3-D Raceway for Electrons in Nanoscale Crystal Slices Found

Researchers have observed, for the first time, an exotic 3-D racetrack for electrons in ultrathin slices of a tiny crystal they made at Berkeley Lab. The team witnessed a unique behavior in which electrons rotate around one surface, then through the bulk of the material to its opposite surface and back. More>

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Longest Record of Continuous Carbon Flux Data is Now Publicly Available

The FLUXNET collaboration’s most recent data release includes some of the longest continuous records of ecosystem data ever taken. The information has undergone extensive quality checks and is now publicly available for download, thanks partly to tools developed by Lab scientists. More>

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Construction of World’s Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Moves Forward

LUX-ZEPLIN, an ultrasensitive dark matter detector, has cleared a major approval milestone and is on track to begin its mile-deep hunt for theoretical particles known as WIMPs in 2020. WIMPs are among the top prospects for explaining dark matter, the unseen stuff that we have observed only through gravitational effects. More>

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2017 Projects Announced for JGI, EMSL Joint FICUS Program

Ten projects have been selected for the “Facilities Integrating Collaborations for User Science” (FICUS) initiative led by the JGI and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The FICUS initiative represents a unique opportunity for scientists to harness the combined power of genomics and molecular characterization in a single proposed research project. More>

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JGI Analysis Helps Find Clues on How Fungi Help Trees Tolerate Drought

A team including JGI researchers has identified adaptations in the transcriptome of the most common ectomycorrhizal fungus that could help their hosts be more resistant to drought stress, a finding that could be useful in developing more plant feedstocks for bioenergy amidst the changing climate. More>

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Advanced Light Source, Foundry to Play Role in 2 New NSF-Funded Centers

The National Science Foundation’s five-year awards for Science and Technology Centers include a Center for Bright Beams, to improve the production of ultra-bright electron beams, with the ALS’s Howard Padmore, and a Center on Real-Time Functional Imaging to improve nano- and atomic-scale imaging, with ALS’s Roger Falcone and the Foundry’s Andy Minor and other Lab researchers. More>

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A Conscious Coupling of Magnetic and Electric Materials

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Cornell University have successfully paired ferroelectric and ferrimagnetic materials so that their alignment can be controlled with a small electric field at near room temperatures. The achievement could open doors to ultra low-power microprocessors, storage devices and next-generation electronics. More>

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Berkeley Lab Scientists Contribute to New Soil Carbon Study

Margaret Torn and Lydia Vaughn of the Climate & Ecosystem Sciences Division contributed to a paper in the journal Science that found that soil will absorb far less atmospheric carbon than expected during the 21st century. The research, led by scientists from UC Irvine, was conducted by adding highly accurate radiocarbon dating of soil to standard Earth system models. More>

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Fluorescent Ruby Red Roofs Stay as Cool as White

Elementary school science teaches us that in the sun, dark colors get hot while white stays cool. Now new research from Berkeley Lab’s Heat Island Group has found an exception: scientists have determined that certain dark pigments can stay just as cool as white by using fluorescence, the re-emission of absorbed light. More>

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JGI’s FICUS Program Helps with Study on Microbial Impacts from Fracking

Through FICUS, — JGI’s collaborative science program with PNNL’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab — Ohio State researchers reconstructed microbial genomes from fractured shale for the first time as part of efforts to understand the impact of hydraulic fracturing on microbial communities in the deep subsurface. More>

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