Today at Berkeley Lab

Shortest Wavelength Plasmons Ever in Single Walled Nanotubes

Feng Wang, of the Materials Sciences Division and Kavli ENSI, lead a team of researchers at the Advanced Light Source that observed “Luttinger-liquid” plasmons in metallic single-walled nanotubes. This holds great promise for novel plasmonic and nanophotonic devices over a broad frequency range, including telecom wavelengths. More>

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Study on Environmental Impacts of Shared Driverless Vehicles

A new paper co-authored by ETA researcher Jeff Greenblatt looks at the potential energy and environmental impacts of combining two emerging trends: driverless cars and on-demand mobility. He notes several synergies that may result from using autonomous vehicles as shared cars, including lower greenhouse gas emissions. More>

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Unlocking the Rice Immune System

Pam Ronald, a member of the Physical Sciences Division who directs JBEI’s Grass Genetics program, led a study that identified a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers an immunity response in rice plants, enabling the plants to resist a devastating blight disease. In addition to being a staple food, rice is the model for grass-type biofuels. More>

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Zooming In: Revealing Science Concealed in Large Image Data Sets

By applying a combination of machine learning and pattern recognition, Daniela Ushizima and her Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory colleagues are developing techniques to automatically analyze data, filtering them for useful information. More>

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New Theory Says Dark Matter Acts Like Well-Known Particle

An international group of researchers — including Berkeley Lab physicist Hitoshi Murayama — has proposed a theory that dark matter is very similar to pions, which are responsible for binding atomic nuclei together. More>

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MANTISSA Finds New Ways to Solve Big Data Analysis Challenges

Researchers are working to address emerging data management and analysis issues through MANTISSA, a DOE-funded program that supports development of novel algorithms to enable new software tools in various science domains to run at scale on current and next-generation supercomputers. More>

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JGI Team Helps Evaluate Fungi for Bioremediation

As published in Plos One, a team including Joint Genome Institute scientists evaluated the potential bioremediation capabilities of six white rot fungi. The team is looking for fungi that can break down oil in contaminated canal waters. More>

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Weyl Fermions Discovered With Help From Advanced Light Source

With help from ALS beamline 4.0.3, a research team led by Princeton University has discovered Weyl fermions, elusive massless particles that can behave as either matter or antimatter inside a crystal, which means it could provide a much more stable and efficient transporter of data than electrons. More>

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Ultra-Low-Cost Solution to a Big Water Problem

Katya Cherukumilli of the Energy Technologies Area won first place in the Designing Solutions for Poverty contest for her super-low-cost approach to groundwater purification in India. Her technology uses use slightly processed bauxite, an aluminum-rich ore, to remove the excess fluoride. More>

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A Most Singular Nano-Imaging Technique

A multi-institutional team of researchers led by Paul Alivisatos has developed a new imaging technique called “SINGLE” that provides the first atomic-scale 3D structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. This is an important step for improving the design of colloidal nanoparticles for catalysis and energy research applications. More>

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