Today at Berkeley Lab

How a New Telescope Will Measure the Expansion of the Universe

In this Q&A, Lab physicists Michael Levi and David Schlegel discuss the future of the DESI project and how its forthcoming map will help scientists better understand dark energy. More>

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Bioengineer Takes ‘Intelligent Design’ Approach to Viruses

Rather than trying to quiet the body’s defenses against viruses, physical bioscientist David Schaffer has favored a kind of “intelligent design” approach to modify the virus. Known as directed evolution, the strategy uses genetic engineering to find variations in the virus that will allow it to effectively deliver drugs to target cells. More>

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Venkat Srinivasan Presents to CARB on the Future of Batteries

Venkat Srinivasan, head of the Lab’s Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Department, spoke at the California Air Resources Board last week on battery development and his vision for accelerating battery innovation by encouraging more manufacturing in the U.S. Click here for his slides and a video of the talk.

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Finding the Flavor of Neutrinos

A Berkeley Lab researcher has done a new analysis of data from the IceCube observatory at the South Pole, showing that the high-energy astrophysical neutrino data collected from 2010 to 2013 is a mixture containing roughly equal components of the three types of neutrinos. More>

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Counting All Costs, Saving Energy is Still Cheap, Say Researchers

What does it cost to save electricity? Berkeley Lab researchers have conducted the most comprehensive study yet of the full cost of saving electricity by U.S. utility efficiency programs and now have an answer: 4.6 cents. More>

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Birnessite Nanosheets Need Only Water, Sunlight To React

Manganese (Mn) oxides are some of the most redox reactive minerals in natural waters, breaking down natural organic matter into carbon dioxide. Recently, however, it has been found that photoexcitation of the manganese oxide birnessite could lead to net reduction in water without any organic molecule present. More>

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Extreme Cold and the CUORE Experiment

A story in Symmetry magazine looks at how scientists on an experiment in Italy are looking for a process so rare, it is thought to occur less than once every trillion, trillion years. To find it, Berkeley Lab researchers have helped create the single coldest cubic meter in the universe.

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Good IDEAS on Virtual Terrestrial Ecosystems

Earth scientists Carl Steefel, Eoin Brodie, and Charlie Koven, among others, collectively sought ways of applying new scientific computing capabilities to studies of Earth’s subsurface. The result was IDEAS. More>

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National Security on the Move with High Energy Physics

With a $10 million award from the Department of Energy, Lab scientists, including Cameron Geddes of BELLA, is developing a portable technology that will quickly and safely detect nuclear material hidden within large objects, such as shipping cargo containers or sealed waste drums. More>

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Major Artificial Photosynthesis Advance Poses Environmental Win/Win

Peidong Yang, Christopher Chang, and Michelle Chang led a potentially game-changing breakthrough. By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, they created a solar-powered system in which valuable chemical products can be produced from sequestered carbon dioxide. More>

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