Today at Berkeley Lab

A 2D Lattice of Molecular Qubits for Quantum Computing

Quantum computers promise to solve intractable problems in topics from cryptography to artificial intelligence. To build these machines, we need to incorporate qubits (quantum bits of information) into a scalable, robust, solid-state architecture. With help from the Advanced Light Source, researchers developed a way to control the orientation and position of qubits in a two-dimensional molecular lattice. More>

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How Drought and Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution

One in 10 Americans depend on the Colorado River for bathing and drinking. Last fall’s record-high temperatures reduced Colorado snowpack in winter 2018 to 66 percent of normal, sparking concern over water shortages downstream and leaving water managers fearful of a repeat. Berkeley Lab hydrological science expert Bhavna Arora explains how unseasonably warm weather and drought can affect water quality. More>

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Team Breaks Exaop Barrier With Deep Learning Application

A team of computational scientists from Berkeley Lab and Oak Ridge National Laboratory and engineers from NVIDIA have, for the first time, demonstrated an exascale-class deep learning application that has broken the exaop barrier — an achievement that earned them a spot on this year’s list of finalists for the Gordon Bell Prize. More>

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Ancient Pigment Can Boost Energy Efficiency

Egyptian blue, derived from calcium copper silicate, was routinely used on ancient depictions of gods and royalty. Previous studies have shown that when Egyptian blue absorbs visible light, it then emits light in the near-infrared range. Now a team led by Berkeley Lab researchers has confirmed the pigment’s fluorescence can be 10 times stronger than previously thought. More>

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New Clues to Cut Through the Mystery of Titan’s Atmospheric Haze

Experiments at Berkeley Lab have helped scientists zero in on a low-temperature chemical mechanism that may help explain the complex molecular compounds that make up the nitrogen-rich haze layer surrounding Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. More>

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‘Spacesuits’ Protect Microbes Destined to Live in Space

Newly developed “spacesuits” for bacteria allow them to survive in environments that would otherwise kill them. UC Berkeley chemists — including the Lab’s Peidong Yang — have developed the protective suits to extend the bacteria’s lifespan in a unique system that pairs live bacteria with light-absorbing semiconductors to capture carbon dioxide and convert it to chemicals that can be used by industry or, someday, in space colonies. More>

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Normal Is Good: Breast Cells Produced in Novel Media Resemble Those In Vivo

Lab scientists have published a new PLOS ONE study describing a comprehensive analysis of three kinds of media used to grow human breast epithelial cells. The M87A medium – newly developed by the Biosciences Area’s Martha Stampfer and James Garbe – produces cell cultures that grow well and best resemble normal breast cells found in the body. More>

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By Jove! Methane’s Effects on Sunlight Vary by Region

Scientists in the Lab’s Climate and Ecosystems Division have identified large regional variability in the ways methane acts as a solar absorber, finding that methane absorption, or “radiative forcing,” is 10 times stronger over some desert regions, and nearly three times more powerful in the presence of clouds. More>

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Toward a New Light: Advanced Light Source Upgrade Project Moves Forward

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a scientific user facility at Berkeley Lab, has received federal approval (an approval step known as Critical Decision 1, or CD-1) to proceed with preliminary design, planning and R&D work for a major upgrade project that will boost the brightness of its X-ray beams at least a hundredfold. The upgrade will give the ALS, which this year celebrates its 25th anniversary, brighter beams with a more ordered structure.  More>

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Berkeley Quantum to Accelerate Innovation in Quantum Information Science

Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley are announcing the formation of Berkeley Quantum, a partnership designed to accelerate and expand innovation in quantum information science (QIS). Berkeley Quantum will advance U.S. quantum capabilities by establishing powerful research alliances among UC Berkeley, Berkeley Lab, and their partners. They will bring their strengths in QIS research, theory, algorithms, and applications to help solve, together, some of the most difficult problems in quantum science. More>

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