Today at Berkeley Lab

Scientists Set Quantum Speed Limit

Researchers, including Berkeley Lab chemical scientist K. Birgitta Whaley, have proved a fundamental relationship between energy and time that sets a “quantum speed limit” on processes ranging from quantum computing and tunneling to optical switching. More>

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Early Stage Work Shows Graphene Could be Used as a Semiconductor

A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab materials scientist Lane Martin has found a way to control the movement and placement of electrons in graphene. The finding represents a significant step forward for graphene as an advanced substitute for silicon in semiconductors and integrated circuits. More>

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A New Pathway to Valleytronics

A potential avenue to quantum computing currently generating buzz in the high-tech industry is “valleytronics,” in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors. Now, a promising new pathway to valleytronic technology has been uncovered by Feng Wang. More>

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Smithsonian Features Early Recordings, Enabled by Lab Technology

The National Museum of American History’s “Year of Innovation” showcases battle between Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison to develop sound-capturing machines, much like the modern tug-of-war between Apple and Microsoft. Exhibit visitors can hear these early sounds thanks to research by the Lab’s Carl Haber and Earl Cornell. More>

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Earth Scientist Identifies Hot Moments in Cool Watershed

Narrated by ESD’s Environmental Remediation and Water Resources Program Lead Ken Williams, this video, entitled “SFA 2.0—Watershed Structure and Controls,” explains the importance of a watershed—an ensemble of vegetation, land-surface terrain, and subsurface compartments from and through which rivers drain. More>

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California’s Policies Can Significantly Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions through 2030

A new model of the impact of California’s existing and proposed policies on its greenhouse gas reduction goals suggests that the state is on track to meet 2020 goals, but the state will need to do more to reach its 2050 climate goals. The paper by Jeff Greenblatt has been published in Energy Policy. More>

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How to Build Your Own Particle Detector

The scale of the detectors at the Large Hadron Collider is almost incomprehensible: They weigh thousands of tons and contain millions of detecting elements. But particle detectors aren’t always so complicated. In fact, some particle detectors are so simple that you can make (and operate) them in your own home. More>

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Lattice QCD Calculations Reveal Inner Workings of Lightest Nuclei

Using resources at NERSC, a research team has demonstrated for the first time the ability of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) — a fundamental theory in particle physics — to calculate the magnetic structure of some of the lightest nuclei. More>

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Screening Plants for Potential Natural Products

A team led by earth scientist Tamas Torok demonstrated in vitro biodiversity is sufficiently broad enough to be used for natural plant product screening. In vitro cultures showed enough biodiversity to serve as a faster, cheaper and more stable alternative to intact plants for natural product screening. More>

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Solving an Organic Semiconductor Mystery

Naomi Ginsberg of the Materials Sciences and the Physical Biosciences Divisions led a team that identified the mysterious source of performance issues that can plague organic semiconductors as nanocrystallites in domain interfaces. More>

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