Today at Berkeley Lab

Lord of the Microrings: A Breakthrough in Microring Laser Cavities

Materials Sciences Division Director Xiang Zhang led the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand even from a conventional multi-mode laser cavity. This could impact a optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data storage, and high-resolution spectroscopy. More>

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Creating the Coldest Cubic Meter in the Universe

As part of an international collaboration, Lab scientists helped create the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The cooled chamber was chilled to 6 milliKelvin or -273.144 degrees Celsius in preparation for a forthcoming experiment that will study neutrinos, ghostlike particles that could hold the key to the existence of matter around us. More>

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Materials Trick Might Help Move Computers Beyond Silicon

Research led by materials scientist Lane Martin has found an easy way to improve the performance of ferroelectric materials for use in computer processors that would be capable of both computation and memory storage without continuous external power sources. More>

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Boosting Biogasoline Production in Microbes

Researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute, led by Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, a chemist with the Physical Biosciences Division, have identified microbial genes that can improve both the tolerance and the production of biogasoline in engineered strains of Escherichia coli. More>

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POLARBEAR Detects Curls in the Universe’s Oldest Light

A team of physicists — led Berkeley Lab’s Adrian Lee — has measured a subtle characteristic in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation that will allow them to map the large-scale structure of the universe, determine the masses of neutrinos and perhaps uncover some of the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy. More>

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Study Reveals Molecular Structure of Water at Gold Electrodes

A study led by Miquel Salmeron of the Materials Sciences Division recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions. Elucidating the molecular structure at the solid-liquid interface under these conditions is critical to battery design. More>

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A 3D Map of the Adolescent Universe

Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see today. More>

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DESI Wins $1.1 Million Award

The Heising-Simons Foundation has awarded $1.1M to the DESI project with the goal of helping to fabricate the unique optics needed to capture spectra of the young expanding universe. The funding comes on the heels of DESI’s CD-1 review by the Department of Energy’s Office of Project Assessment, which in September favorably reviewed the project’s concept and budget range. More>

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Dispelling a Misconception About Mg-Ion Batteries

David Prendergast and Liwen Wan at the Molecular Foundry used supercomputer simulations to dispel a popular misconception about magnesium-ion batteries that should help advance the development of multivalent ion battery technology. More>

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ALS Progression Linked to Increased Protein Instability

A new study by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Berkeley Lab, and other institutions suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The study provides evidence that those proteins linked to more severe forms of the disease are less stable structurally and more prone to form clusters or aggregates. More>

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