Today at Berkeley Lab

2016 Lab Science in Review

From big gains in understanding Earth’s climate and environment, to advancements in health, computing, clean energy, imaging, cosmology, materials sciences, and energy efficiency, the Lab had a banner year of impactful research. Go here to view a social media round-up of the Lab’s scientific highlights.

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DOE Report on Quantum Materials for Energy Relevant Technology Now Available

The “Basic Research Needs Report on Quantum Materials” that Berkeley Lab Senior Science Writer (retired) Lynn Yarris worked on for the Office of Science on behalf of the Lab is now online and can be viewed here. It includes design work by Public Affairs Creative Services’s Susan Brand.

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Social Media Feature Highlights 7 Lab Imaging Tools Pushing Science Forward

Lab scientists are developing new ways to see the unseen. Here are seven imaging advances that are helping to push science forward, from developing better batteries to peering inside cells to exploring the nature of the universe. View this feature and more on the Lab’s Facebook page. More>

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New Websites for Lab Video, Photography Services

Need video or photos to promote your science, share news, feature researchers, or cover a special event? Learn more about these services on their newly launched websites, including details on how to make requests, the production process, rates, and contact information. Go here for video website and here for photo website.

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Public Affairs Offers Media Training Sept. 30

The two-hour session is ideal for researchers and others who may need to speak to the news media or the public. Former CBS News producer, and current Lab Communications manager, Jon Weiner will lead this free class from 1 to 3 p.m. on Sept. 30. Contact Weiner for more information or to sign up. More>

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Carbon Voyage Update: A Floating Classroom for Students

All members of Jim Bishop’s team have been trained in key deck operations, such as working the tag lines during CTD deployment. UC Berkeley junior William Kumler, for instance, has been introduced to the winch at the stern of the ship. He stood at the controls during sediment trap deployments and recovery, vigilantly following the signals for letting out or taking in cable. More>

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Carbon Voyage Update: Star Charting Santa Cruz Basin at Night

In her latest blog post, science writer Sarah Yang discusses the ship’s spatial mapping of the region, surveying temperature, salinity and other variables relevant to the particle concentration in the water. Connect the dots and the star will appear. “A star pattern is an effective pattern if you want to cover the greatest region,” says researcher Jim Bishop. More>

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Carbon Voyage Update: The Return of the First Carbon Flux Explorer

There’s a mixture of relief and joy every time a robotic float is recovered, reports science writer Sarah Yang, aboard the research vessel “Oceanus.” Years of research and months of intense engineering go into preparing each device for its life at sea, so when Carbon Flux Explorer 3 sent its ping to say that it had surfaced, the reaction was one of excitement and anticipation. More>

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Carbon Voyage Update: Robotic Technology Helps Monitoring

In her latest blog post, science writer Sarah Yang discusses the optical sedimentation recorder (OSR) instrument that researcher Jim Bishop designed to catch organic matter sinking vertically and funnel it to a glass platform, where a camera takes images at regular intervals. This and other technologies improve the study of the ocean’s biological carbon pump. More>

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Researchers Study Oceans, Carbon at Sea; Lab Science Writer Joins Them

Lab Scientists and engineers embark on 10-day scientific expedition aboard the vessel “Oceanus” to study the ocean’s biological carbon pump. Sarah Yang from Public Affairs is tagging along and will blog daily about the trip. These posts will be published in TABL. Go here to read Yang’s initial installments.

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