Today at Berkeley Lab

The Most Precise, and Puzzling, Energy Measurements of Antineutrinos

An international team that includes researchers from Berkeley Lab has captured the most precise — and puzzling — energy measurements yet of ghostly particles called reactor antineutrinos produced at a nuclear power complex in China. More>

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Here’s Why Every Glass Of Wine You Drink Is Radioactive

Lab physicist Richard Muller explains why “drinking alcohol is required to have at least 400 radioactive decays per minute for each 750 ml.” The article is from a Quora series, in which facts that sound far-fetched are explained by “people with unique insights.” More>

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New Galaxy-Hunting Sky Camera Sees Redder Better

A newly upgraded camera that incorporates light sensors developed at Berkeley Lab is one of the best cameras on the planet for studying outer space at red wavelengths too red for the human eye to see. More>

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Jan. 27 Talk on History and Future of Computerized Data Acquisition

Frank Ogletree will discuss “History and Future of Computerized Data Acquisition: Applications to Scanning Microscopy” at noon in the Building 50 Auditorium. The talk is part of the Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium series, which has a new organizing committee. More>

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Veteran Physicists Pursue Their Passion Into Retirement

The Lab’s Physics Division recently held a celebration of its most senior scientists, whose combined years of research total more than 1,000 years. Writer Keri Troutman sat down with three of them — (l-r) Herbert Steiner, Geoffrey Chew, and John Kadyk — to talk about their lives and times at Berkeley Lab and in the world of physics. More>

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After Repeated Pounding, Antihydrogen Reveals its Charge: Zero

An eight-hour experiment using the ALPHA trap at CERN confirmed with 20 times greater precision than before that the charge of the antihydrogen atom — the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom — is zero. Berkeley Lab is part of the ALPHA experiment. More>

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Explore Galaxies Far, Far Away at Internet Speeds

Scientists have released an “expansion pack” for a virtual tour of the universe that you can enjoy from the comfort of your own computer. The latest collection of publicly accessible sky images roughly doubles the size of the searchable universe from the project’s original release in May. More>

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Physics Division Honors 1000 Years of Contributions From its Researchers

The Jan. 8 event drew about 100 attendees, mostly Lab physicists and retirees, who shared stories about the Bevatron, bubble chamber, BaBar, as well as efforts by researchers in the 1980s to support scientists affected by a Soviet Union crackdown on dissedents. Organizers estimate that the collective efforts of its scientists total more than 1,000 years. More>

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CERN & U.S. Increase Cooperation

At a recent ceremony, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Pamela Hamamoto and CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer signed five formal agreements that will serve as the framework for future US-CERN collaboration. More>

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George Smoot Stars in New TV Commercial

A well-known tax software maker has launched a new series of commercials featuring celebrities known for their intellect to prove you don’t need to be a genius to figure out your income tax using the application. One of the ads features Lab physicist and Nobel Prize winner George Smoot. Go here to view the commercial.

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