Today at Berkeley Lab

Oct. 26 Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium

Joel Fajans of the Accelerator Technology and Applied Physics Division will speak on “Tools and Diagnostics for Production and Study of Antihydrogen Atoms” on Wednesday, Oct. 26, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. More>

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How an Underground Science Facility Got Off the Ground

In the Black Hills of South Dakota, researchers at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) — situated a mile below ground—have been seeking out the nature of dark matter and ghostly particles known as neutrinos. Berkeley Lab has played a critical role in establishing, developing, and operating the facility. More>

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LUX: The End of an Era

The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment — which started taking data in 2013 — has proven to be the world’s most sensitive dark matter experiment. Housed nearly a mile below ground at the Sanford Lab in South Dakota, LUX is being decommissioned to make room for the larger LUX-ZEPLIN experiment, a next-generation dark matter detector set to begin operating in 2020. More>

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Planetarium Show Brings ‘Phantom’ Matter to Life

A new planetarium show, produced in part by Berkeley Lab’s Michael Barnett, is designed to immerse audiences in the search for dark matter, which we have so far detected only through its gravitational effects. More>

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Latest Daya Bay Results: New Limits on Where Sterile Neutrinos May be Hiding

A team of scientists, including Berkeley Lab researchers, working on a neutrino experiment at Daya Bay in China, and a separate team working on the MINOS experiment have released a set of results that limit the possible hiding places for theoretical particles known as sterile neutrinos. These as-yet-undiscovered particles are one of many possible candidates for dark matter. More>

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Lab Physicist Receives Academic Senate’s Faculty Service Award

Bob Jacobsen, current dean of undergraduate studies and a longtime leader in the Academic Senate, has been honored with the Berkeley Faculty Service Award for 2016. The award is given to those who has given outstanding and dedicated service to the Berkeley campus and the academic senate. More>

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Physics Division Hosts Commemoration for J.D. Jackson

The Physics Division hosted an event on September 26 to honor the memory of longtime lab physicist and UC Berkeley physics professor J.D. Jackson. The event concluded with the dedication of a new interaction space, the J. D. Jackson Discussion Room. Go here for more on the event, including photos, agenda, and additional details.

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Richard Muller’s New Book Links Flow of Time With Big Bang

A simple question from his wife, “Does physics really allow people to travel back in time?” propelled Lab physicist Richard Muller on a quest to resolve a fundamental problem that had puzzled him throughout his 45-year career: Why does the arrow of time flow inexorably toward the future, constantly creating new “nows”? That quest resulted in his new book “Now: The Physics of Time.” More>

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Construction of World’s Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Moves Forward

LUX-ZEPLIN, an ultrasensitive dark matter detector, has cleared a major approval milestone and is on track to begin its mile-deep hunt for theoretical particles known as WIMPs in 2020. WIMPs are among the top prospects for explaining dark matter, the unseen stuff that we have observed only through gravitational effects. More>

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Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium on Sept. 28

Marcus Lehmann — with Cyclotron Road’s CalWave project — will lead an interdisciplinary instrumentation colloquium on Wednesday, Sept. 28, from noon to 1 p.m., in the Building 50 Auditorium. Attendees may bring their lunch to the event. Live video streaming will be available. More>

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