Today at Berkeley Lab

What to Expect Next From the World’s Largest Particle Accelerator

In March, when researchers flip the switch to the world’s largest, most powerful particle accelerator, scientists from all over the world will be watching. Lab researchers Beate Heinemann and Peter Jacobs were on a recent panel of scientists that discussed the scientific implications of this new and improved accelerator. More>

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Feb. 25 Instrumentation Talk on Next Gen Laser Plasma Accelerators

Almantas Galvanauskas of the University of Michigan will “Pathway to the Next Generation Laser Plasma Accelerator Drivers” on Wednesday, Feb. 25, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. The talk is part of the Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium Series. More>

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Large Hadron Collider Gears Up for Restart

Since shutting down in early 2013, the LHC and its detectors have undergone a multitude of upgrades and repairs. When the particle accelerator restarts, it will collide protons at an unprecedented energy: 13 trillion electron volts. More>

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Instrumentation Talk on Scintillators for Nuclear Nonproliferation

Sara Pozzi of the University of Michigan will discuss recent results from experiments performed on plutonium at the JRC in Ispra, Italy and on uranium at the Los Alamos Lab. The event takes place on Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. More>

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Smithsonian Features Early Recordings, Enabled by Lab Technology

The National Museum of American History’s “Year of Innovation” showcases battle between Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison to develop sound-capturing machines, much like the modern tug-of-war between Apple and Microsoft. Exhibit visitors can hear these early sounds thanks to research by the Lab’s Carl Haber and Earl Cornell. More>

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Instrumentation Talk on Radiation Detection Developments

Kai Vetter will present an Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium talk on “Radiation Detection Developments in the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics Program,” on Wednesday, Jan. 28 at noon in Building 15-253. The presentation will be lived streamed here. More>

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Old Photons, New Tricks

A much clearer picture of the history of the universe has emerged, thanks to innovative detection and analysis of the handful of photons arriving from outer space. “It’s amazing that we can piece out these stories from that little information,” says Berkeley Lab’s Saul Perlmutter. More>

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Survey Opens a New Public View of the Sky

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) issued the final release of the third epoch of the survey. “Data Release 12″ contains measurements of the properties of nearly half a billion stars and galaxies, making it one of the largest databases in history. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey is the largest program in the SDSS-III. More>

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Large Hadron Collider Filled With Liquid Helium

The cryogenics team at CERN finished filling the eight curved sections of the LHC with liquid helium, and is now cooled to below minus 452 degrees Fahrenheit. The Lab’s Beate Heinemann said she is excited about the high-energy run starting in spring next year, which will open the possibility of finding new particles that are re just out of reach. More>

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New App for Learning About Particle Physics

The Particle Adventure app makes checking out the world of quarks, dark matter, and particle accelerators as easy as tapping touchscreen icons. Search via categories, like “How Do We Know Any of This?” and “Unsolved Mysteries,” or dig deep into topics such as the discovery of the Higgs boson. More>

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