Today at Berkeley Lab

Special Series Highlights the Lab’s Summer Interns

All this week, the experiences of students and faculty who worked on big science at Berkeley Lab over the summer will be presented via feature videos, Instagram takeovers, and articles. Visit Today at Berkeley Lab and follow @BerkeleyLab on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to learn how an internship at Berkeley Lab can help steer a student’s career in STEM fields. In today’s video, we focus on Anya Nugent, a physics major from Hamilton College who participated in the Berkeley Lab Undergraduate Research program under the supervision of Shirley Ho and Zachary Slepian in the Physics Division.

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Lab’s Kathryn Zurek Weighs In on Dark Matter Theory

In the July 18 issue of Symmetry magazine, theoretical physicist Kathryn Zurek (Physics Division) considers how a new theory on modified gravity measures up against figuring out dark matter. More>

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Anya Nugent and Sai Prabhakar, Summer Interns in the News

Two recent stories highlighted Lab interns in the Berkeley Lab Undergraduate Research (BLUR) program: Nugent’s internship in the Physics Division was featured in Hamilton College news, and Sai Prabhakar’s work with the Joint Genome Institute was highlighted in The Independent. For more information about BLUR, go here.

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Survey Provides High-Precision Measurements of Universe’s Makeup

New measurements – made possible by the 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera in Chile – of the amount and “clumpiness” of dark matter in the present-day cosmos were made with a precision that rivals that of inferences from the early universe by a space telescope, the European Space Agency’s Planck observatory. More>

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Berkeley Lab Camera Can ‘See’ Sound

The Lab’s Carl Haber (Physics) and Earl Cornell (Engineering) are applying a technology they developed that uses a unique camera instead of phonographic needles to extract audio from century-old wax cylinder recordings of Native American speakers from around California. More>

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Throwback Thursday…Through the Looking Glass in 1973

This photo shows John Kadyk of the Physics Division looking through the Electron Shower Detector for Stanford Positron Electron Accelerator Ring (SPEAR), taken in Building 51 on Jan. 22, 1973. An electromagnetic shower begins when a high-energy electron, positron or photon enters a material. More>

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Construction on Mega-Science Neutrino Experiment Gets Underway

In a unique groundbreaking ceremony held July 21 at a research site in South Dakota, a group of dignitaries, scientists, and engineers from around the world marked the start of construction of a massive international experiment that could change our understanding of the universe. Berkeley Lab Project Management Officer Kem Robinson attended the event. More>

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Physics Division Hosts High School Students, Teachers for Workshop

The group participated in the five-day workshop on “Physics in and Through Cosmology” last week. Presentations from Lab researchers covered such topics as cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos, the ATLAS experiment, dark matter, dark energy, and the cosmic microwave background. Nobel-prize winner Saul Perlmutter also led a discussion.

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Physics Matters for ATLAS Intern Katie Dunne

In high school, Katie Dunne dreamed of becoming a physicist but didn’t know anyone who worked in science. This summer, as a Berkeley Lab Undergraduate Research intern, she is working with her mentor Maurice Garcia-Sciveres to build prototype integrated circuit test systems for ATLAS as part of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider Project. More>

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DESI, POLARBEAR/Simons Array Teams Gather at the Lab

Researchers with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) collaboration and POLARBEAR/Simons Array collaboration met at the Lab to talk about technical progress on their respective projects. DESI seeks to create the largest 3-D map of the universe, while POLARBEAR is observing the most ancient light in the universe for hints of a period of rapid expansion. More>

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