Today at Berkeley Lab

Planck Collaboration Wins 2018 Gruber Cosmology Prize

The Planck Team — which includes researchers in the Lab’s Computational Research and Physics divisions — has been awarded the 2018 Gruber Cosmology Prize. The prize honors “groundbreaking work in the fields of cosmology, genetics, and neuroscience that inspires and enables fundamental shifts in knowledge and culture.” More>

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Visiting Photographers to Participate in Lab Photowalk Event on May 16

About 30 photographers are scheduled to visit various Lab sites — including the ALS, Molecular Foundry, NERSC, and Building 62 battery labs — on May 16 as part of a Global Physics Photowalk competition. The Lab also is hosting a separate photo competition for employees, contractors, affiliates, and those who conduct research at the Lab.

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Lab’s ‘Particle Adventure’ Website Helps Makes Physics Education Fun

What started as the “Fundamental Particles and Interactions” poster in 1987 — in response to high school teachers searching for ways to teach modern physics — has morphed into the “Particle Adventure” website that receives around 5 million hits per year. It is now also in app form. The website is maintained by the Lab’s Particle Data Group. More>

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Vetri Velan Wins APS Award; Honorable Mention for Peter Madigan

Vetri Velan of the Physics Division won the Graduate Instrumentation Research Award from the GIRA program for his proposal on “Measurement of Light and Heat Signal Yields in Superfluid 4He With Calorimetric Readout.” GIRA was established by the American Physical Society. Peter Madigan, also with the Physics Division, won an honorable mention for his proposal. More>

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Early Career LDRD Spotlight: Zach Marshall Searches for Supersymmetry

With funding from an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development award announced last November, Zach Marshall of the Physics Division and his team are building a powerful super-scheduling platform that will help particle physicists from CERN to Daya Bay process more data faster without investing in costly new computing infrastructure. More>

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Major DESI Components Arrive at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona

Components for the Berkeley Lab-led Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) recently arrived at Kitt Peak National Observatory and were delivered inside the Mayall Telescope dome. The components will become part of the support structure for DESI’s sensitive fiber-optic positioners that will capture light from millions of distant galaxies. More>

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April 25 Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Talk on Quantum Computers

UC Berkeley’s Norm Tubman will speak on “Quantum Supremacy of Many Body Quantum Simulations: What Is the State of the Art Classically, and What Can Be Done on Near Term Quantum Computers?” on April 25, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. Flyer>

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Start of Most Sensitive Search Yet for Dark Matter Axion

Thanks to low-noise superconducting quantum amplifiers — developed by the Lab’s John Clarke — physicists are embarking on the most sensitive search yet for axions, one of the top dark matter candidates. The Axion Dark Matter Experiment is the world’s first and only experiment to have achieved the necessary sensitivity to “hear” the telltale signs of dark matter axions. More>

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Distortions in Universe’s Oldest Light Reveal Clearer Picture of Cosmic Web

Scientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe’s earliest light to map huge tube-like structures invisible to our eyes — known as filaments — that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters. More>

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The Lab’s Particle Physics Book Continues to Thrive

Want to know the latest research on the Higgs boson? Or the current findings on the search for dark energy? You could search the internet, or even the latest scientific literature. Or you could find all your answers in one spot: The Review of Particle Physics, the most cited publication in particle physics and produced by the Lab’s Particle Data Group. More>

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