Today at Berkeley Lab

Lab Scientists Receive Lawrence Awards

David Schlegel, Peidong Yang, Carolyn Bertozzi and Jizhong Zhou, who are all affiliated with Berkeley Lab, were among nine scientists named by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz as recipients of the 2015 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, DOE’s highest scientific honor. Awardees will receive a medal and a $20,000 honorarium. More>

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Drug Perks Up Old Muscles and Aging Brains

Researchers — including physical bioscientist David Schaffer — have discovered that a small-molecule drug simultaneously perks up old stem cells in the brains and muscles of mice, a finding that could lead to drug interventions for humans that would make aging tissues throughout the body act young again. More>

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CLAIRE Brings Electron Microscopy to Soft Materials

Naomi Ginsberg of Materials Sciences, Physical Biosciences, aand Kavli-ENSI led the development of a technique called “CLAIRE,” that extends the incredible resolution of electron microscopy to the non-invasive nanoscale imaging of soft matter. More>

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Using Microbial Communities to Assess Environmental Contamination

A multi-institutional study sponsored by ENIGMA, a DOE “Scientific Focus Area Program” based at Berkeley Lab, has found that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants and serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors. More>

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PBD’s Jennifer Doudna Profiled in the New York Times

As a child in Hilo, Doudna felt out of place. She had blond hair and blue eyes, and she was taller than the other kids, who were mostly of Polynesian and Asian descent. Her isolation contributed to a kind of bookishness that propelled her toward science. More>

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PBD’s Kuriyan Honored by the Royal Society

Physical bioscientist John Kuriyan was recently elected to the Royal Society as a Foreign Member in recognition of his discoveries pertaining to the structure and function of enzymes and molecular switches integral to cell signaling and DNA replication. More>

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Using a Smartphone to Detect Parasites in Blood

A team led by physical bioscientist Daniel Fletcher has developed a new smartphone microscope called CellScope Loa, which uses video to detect and analyze parasitic worm infections in blood. The tool could help fight diseases in remote parts of the world. More>

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Keasling Announces Biosciences’ Reorganization

Citing the changing nature of the Department of Energy’s biology mission, concerns about non-DOE funding, and the benefits of a refreshed divisional structure, Jay Keasling, Associate Laboratory Director for Biosciences, has announced an extensive reorganization of the Biosciences Area, effective October 1. More>

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Bioengineer Takes ‘Intelligent Design’ Approach to Viruses

Rather than trying to quiet the body’s defenses against viruses, physical bioscientist David Schaffer has favored a kind of “intelligent design” approach to modify the virus. Known as directed evolution, the strategy uses genetic engineering to find variations in the virus that will allow it to effectively deliver drugs to target cells. More>

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PBD’s Murthy Recipient of NIH Grant to Spot Drug-Resistant Microbes

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently awarded Berkeley researchers, including Niren Murthy of the Physical Biosciences Division, $5.8 million over the next five years to develop tools to quickly detect and identify drug-resistant pathogens in blood, urine, and other clinical samples. More>

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