Today at Berkeley Lab

Postdoc Awareness Week: 10 Things You Should Know About Dimitri Panagopoulos

A researcher with the Energy Analysis and Environmental Impact Division, Panagopoulos has swum where very few others have dared go, dreams of sailing in an ancient vessel, and used to serve food during very sad occasions. Learn more about Panagopoulos here.

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Postdoc Appreciation Week: 10 Things You Should Know About Hang Deng

A researcher with the Energy Geosciences Division, Deng once met a recent presidential candidate, has a mysterious talent for ordering at restaurants, and a food-related dream that will never come true. Go here to learn more about Deng. Postdocs are invited to a special event on the ALS patio at 5 p.m. today, featuring food and beverages.

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Postdoc Appreciation Week: 10 Things to Know About Tetiana Shalapska

A researcher with the Materials Sciences Division, Shalapska is from a city full of lions, thinks life is like a box of chocolates, is a cheesecake afficianado, and is the baby of the family despite having a younger brother. Go here to learn more about Tetiana Shalapska. Read about postdoc Hang Deng tomorrow. Are there 10 things we should know about you or a colleague? Send email here.

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Postdoc Appreciation Week: 10 Things to Know About Ben Nachman

A researcher with the ATLAS group in the Physics Division, Nachman has learned to love peanut butter and onion sandwiches, had a very scientific setting for his wedding, and ran a marathon in a very unusual place. Go here to learn more about Ben Nachman. Read about postdoc Tetiana Shalapska tomorrow. Are there 10 things we should know about you or a colleague? Send email here.

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Postdoc Appreciation Week: 10 Things to Know About Joelle Schlapfer

A researcher with the Joint Genome Institute, Schlapfer was a former custodian at a hospital, thought about becoming an artist instead of a scientist, and is humbled by the oldest non-clonal beings on earth, which live right here in California. Go here to learn more about Joelle Schlapfer. Read about postdoc Ben Nachman in tomorrow’s edition of TABL.

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Amy Herr Named a ‘Visionary’ by Berkeley Chamber of Commerce

Biosciences’ Amy Herr is one of three recipients of the “Visionary of the Year” award. The honor is bestowed to local innovators tackling real-world challenges with “imagination and persistence.” Herr’s research focuses on tools to analyze the levels of various proteins within single cells, which could aid the treatment of diseases such as cancer. More>

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Arian Aghajanzadeh Receives Clean Energy Leadership Institute Fellowship

Arian Aghajanzadeh, with ETA’s Building & Industrial Applications Department, has been selected to participate in the highly competitive Clean Energy Leadership Institute’s Fall 2017 Fellowship Training Program. He develops methodologies and software tools for demand response potential and energy efficiency impact estimation. More>

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CRD’s Mauro Del Ben Wins IBM Research Prize

Mauro Del Ben, a postdoc in the Computational Research Division’s Computational Chemistry, Materials and Climate Group, has been awarded the IBM Research Forschungspreis (research prize) for his Ph.D. thesis on “Efficient Non-Local Dynamical Electron Correlation for Condensed Matter Simulations.” More>

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U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren Visits the Lab

Rep. Randy Hultgren (R-Ill.) visited Berkeley Lab on Friday, Sept. 1. Congressman Hultgren serves on the Science, Space and Technology Committee and is a co-chair and founder of the House Science and National Labs Caucus. Fermilab is located in his congressional district.

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Michael Crommie and Alex Zettl Highlighted in DOE Blog

Electrons move through graphene more than 100 times faster than they do through silicon, but graphene is still difficult to use in modern electronics because it lacks a bandgap to direct where and when electrons flow. In this Aug. 30 article, the DOE’s Office of Science featured the efforts of Materials Sciences researchers Michael Crommie (far left) and Alex Zettl to get graphene’s electron traffic under control. More>

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