Today at Berkeley Lab

Kasen Pens Scientific American Article on Understanding Exploding Stars

“Roughly every second, somewhere in our observable universe, another sun is destroyed in a stellar catastrophe — when a star pulsates, collides, collapses to a black hole or explodes as a supernova. This dynamic side of the universe has lately come to the forefront of astronomical research,” says Daniel Kasen of the Lab’s Nuclear Science Division. More>

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Lab’s Spencer Klein Encourages Investment in Neutrino Astronomy

In a commentary for Nature, Klein (Nuclear Science Division) calls for bigger telescope arrays to catch particles form the most energetic places in the Universe. “Designs for neutrino telescopes are on the drawing board and could be up and running in five to ten years — if the astro-, particle- and nuclear-physics communities can come together and coordinate funding,” he says.

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Lab’s Grażyna Odyniec Receives Wybitny Polak Award

The award is given by the Foundation Teraz Polska to outstanding Poles living abroad in recognition of their professional achievements and promoting a positive image of Poland. Odyniec, of the Nuclear Science Division, was recognized in the science category. More>

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DoseNet Delivers Environmental Data as an Educational Tool

A network of radiation-monitoring devices — designed and engineered by UC Berkeley students working with Lab researchers — and a companion website and open-source code serve as educational and outreach tools for an international project called DoseNet that stretches from Northern California classrooms to a city hall in Japan. More>

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Another Successful Nuclear Science Day for Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts

On April 23, over 200 girl and boy scouts and their leaders participated in the 6th annual Nuclear Science Day for Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. Nuclear Science Division, the Advanced Light Source and Workforce Development & Education department co-sponsored this event. Go here to view images from the event, and here for tweets.

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I-Yang Lee Receives APS Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics

Lee, of the Nuclear Sciences Division, was recognized for “seminal contributions to the field of nuclear structure through the development of advanced gamma-ray detectors as realized in the Gammasphere device, and for pioneering work on gamma-ray energy tracking detectors demonstrated by the Gamma-ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETINA).” More>

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Four Lab Scientists Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Biochemist Robert Glaeser, physicist Barbara Jacak, synthetic biologist Jay Keasling and molecular biologist Eva Nogales are among 213 new members elected to the academy, which recognizes accomplished scholars, scientists and artists. More>

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NSF to Provide $35 Million to Support IceCube Neutrino Observatory

The five-year, $35 million cooperative agreement with the University of Wisconsin-Madison will enable the continued operation and management of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The National Science Foundation agreement includes sub-awards to Berkeley Lab. More>

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In Memoriam: Retired Physicist Howard Shugart (1932-2016)

Shugart joined the Lab in 1965 as group lead of the Atomic Beams Group. His research interests included atomic and molecular beams, low energy nuclear physics, and the experimental determination of the mechanical and electromagnetic properties of nuclei and atoms. More>

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Supernova Shockwave Captured by Astronomers for the First Time

Daniel Kasen of the Nuclear Science Division was part of the team that reported this week the first observation of a “shock breakout,” which is when the shock wave of an exploding star punches through the surrounding stellar matter and becomes visible. More>

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