Today at Berkeley Lab

IceCube Neutrinos Point to Long-Sought Cosmic Ray Accelerator

An international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light-years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth. Go here for a Q&A on this discovery with Lab neutrino researcher Spencer Klein. More>

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Two Poets and a Particle Accelerator

Two visiting poets – Kate Greene, a former Berkeley Lab science writer who is an author, essayist, journalist, and poet; and fellow poet, writer, and science enthusiast Anastasios Karnazes – drew inspiration from an overnight stay at Berkeley Lab’s 88-Inch Cyclotron June 14-15. More>

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Berkeley Lab Team Wins Data-Driven Scavenger Hunt for Simulated Nuclear Materials

Competing in a fictitious high-stakes scenario, a group of scientists at Berkeley Lab bested two dozen other teams in a months-long, data-driven scavenger hunt for simulated radioactive materials in a virtual urban environment. More>

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Video on Lab’s Contributions to Discovery of Mendelevium

Using archival footage found at the Lab, Claude Lyneis of the Nuclear Science Division put together a video describing the discovery of element 101, mendelevium. The team that discovered mendelevium included the Lab’s Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso, who helped discover over a dozen elements. The video is featured on the “Voices of the Manhattan Project” website.

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What Rhymes With Cyclotron? Poets Explore the 88-Inch

Kate Greene — a former Lab science writer who is a poet, essayist, journalist, and former laser physicist — and Anastasios Karnazes, also a poet, spent the afternoon and evening at the Lab’s 88-Inch Cyclotron on Thursday to write poetry inspired by their overnight visit. Watch a slideshow of their visit here, and look for an upcoming feature article in TABL for some details from their visit.

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Supercomputers Provide New Window Into the Life and Death of a Neutron

A team led by Berkeley Lab researchers has enlisted powerful supercomputers to calculate — with unprecedented precision — a quantity known as the “nucleon axial coupling” or gA, which is central to our understanding of a neutron’s lifetime. More>

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Alan Poon Helps Boys and Girls ‘Scout’ Out Careers in Nuclear Science

The Lab recently hosted more than 200 Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts for its annual Nuclear Science Day for Scouts. The event, which provides a chance for Boy Scouts to earn a merit badge in nuclear science, and Girl Scouts to earn a “Get to Know Nuclear” patch, has been coordinated by Alan Poon for the past eight years. Go here for more on the program and to view a photo feature on the event.

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Researchers Develop Platform for Hosting Science Data Analytics Competitions

The National Nuclear Security Administration is hosting a competition to find innovative algorithms to detect non-natural radiation sources in urban environments. They’ve teamed up with researchers in the Lab’s Computational Research, Nuclear Science, and Information Technology divisions to build a Kaggle-inspired data analytics competition platform to host it. More>

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First Large-Scale Nuclear Reactor Monitor Will Boost Neutrino Physics

A new Department of Energy project to develop the first detector able to remotely monitor nuclear reactors will also help physicists test the next generation of neutrino observatories. The Lab’s Gabriel Orebi Gann is the principal investigator for the new detector. More>

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Experiment Could Provide Greater Clarity on Matter-Antimatter Imbalance

Scientists working on the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment have shown that they can shield a sensitive, scalable germanium detector array from background radioactivity, a critical step to developing a large experiment to study the nature of neutrinos and probe the universe’s matter-antimatter imbalance. More>

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