Today at Berkeley Lab

NSD’s Jacak Makes Case for a Next-Gen Particle Collider

Nuclear Science’s Barbara Jacak spoke at an American Physical Society meeting about a mysterious, frictionless fluid known as the quark gluon plasma, created by colliding the nuclei of heavy atoms. Data from these collisions suggests that other exotic conditions may produce droplets with similar properties, and a new type of particle collider could help discover how these plasmas form. More>

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Latest Results from Experiments that Recreate Early Form of Matter

Researchers from Berkeley Lab and other institutions, who study high-energy collisions of heavy nuclei to recreate matter as it existed in the very early universe, are gathered at the Quark Matter 2017 conference to present their latest results. These experiments, conducted at Brookhaven National Lab’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at CERN, are revealing intriguing information about the building blocks of visible matter. More>

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Filling in the Nuclear Data Gaps

Berkeley Lab’s Nuclear Data Group is conducting new experiments to address common data needs in nuclear medicine, nuclear energy and fusion R&D, security, and counter-proliferation work. Lee Bernstein was recently brought aboard to lead the group. More>

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In Memoriam: Mendelevium Co-Discoverer Bernard Harvey

Harvey (far right) died on Nov. 29 at age 97. He co-discovered element 101, mendelevium, with Glenn Seaborg in 1955. He wrote the first scientific paper on plutonium chemistry during World War II, which caught the eye of Seaborg. At Seaborg’s urging, Harvey joined the Lab in 1953 and served as director of the 88-inch cyclotron and the Nuclear Science Division before retiring.

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Is This How the Solar System Was Formed?

A low-mass supernova could have sparked the solar system, a group of researchers including the Lab’s Wick Haxton proposes. The researchers drew their conclusion by creating models of low-mass supernova. They also studied short-lived nuclei on meteorites. More>

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Simulations Show Swirling, Whirlpool-Like Structure in Subatomic ‘Soup’

Powerful supercomputer simulations of high-energy collisions between atomic cores provide new insights about the complex structure of a superhot fluid called the quark-gluon plasma. More>

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Accelerator Operator Stitches Together Storied Career at Bevatron, Cyclotron

Catherine “Reba” Siero, an accelerator operator at Berkeley Lab, has worked for more than two decades at its 88-Inch Cyclotron and earlier worked in particle-beam-based cancer treatments and biology research at the lab. More>

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CUORE Collaboration Completes Installation of Large Detector Array

Located deep beneath a mountain in Italy and containing 1,650 pounds of tellurium dioxide crystals, CUORE will search for a never-before-seen particle transformation that could explain the abundance of matter in the universe. The Lab is a member of the collaboration.

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How to Make Superheavy Elements and Finish the Periodic Table

Chemistry World visited Berkeley and Livermore Labs to meet some of the scientists who study superheavy metals. In a series of videos, they were asked how they do it, how many more elements do they think they can make, and what led them to this field of study. The Lab’s Jackie Gates and Ken Gregorich are featured. More>

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Kasen Pens Scientific American Article on Understanding Exploding Stars

“Roughly every second, somewhere in our observable universe, another sun is destroyed in a stellar catastrophe — when a star pulsates, collides, collapses to a black hole or explodes as a supernova. This dynamic side of the universe has lately come to the forefront of astronomical research,” says Daniel Kasen of the Lab’s Nuclear Science Division. More>

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