Today at Berkeley Lab

Office of Science Highlights Work by Foundry’s Ron Zuckermann

The DOE Office of Science recently featured work by Zuckermann of the Molecular Foundry to make new customized materials that self-assemble like proteins do, but are sturdier and longer-lasting. The article also underscores the importance of computational simulations powered by NERSC for the portion of the work focusing on self-assembling synthetic shells for gene therapy applications. More>

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NERSC’s Shane Canon and Doug Jacobsen Discuss Shifter on Podcast

In this RCE (Research Computing and Engineering) podcast, Canon and Jacobsen of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) discuss Shifter, a prototype implementation that NERSC is developing and experimenting with as a scalable way to deploy containers in a high-performance computing environment. Go to the podcast here.

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New Algorithms Extract 3-D Biological Structure From Limited Data

A new algorithmic framework called M-TIP helps researchers determine the molecular structure of proteins and viruses from X-ray free electron laser data, which is crucial in fields like biology and medicine. This work was done by researchers from CAMERA (the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications). More>

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2-D Material’s Traits Could Send Electronics Spinning in New Directions

Scientists created an atomically thin material and used X-rays to measure its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as “spintronics.” The Advanced Light Source and NERSC were used as part of this research. More>

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Cori Ranked Sixth in New TOP500 List

The Cori supercomputer at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the sixth fastest system in the world, according to the latest TOP500 list. The list ranks the world’s most powerful supercomputers based on the Linpack benchmark and is released twice a year. More>

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Simulations Pinpoint Atomic-Level Defects in Solar Cell Nanostructures

A team of researchers at Argonne National Lab and the University of Chicago ran a series of atomistic calculations at NERSC to find the root cause of defects in two commonly used semiconductor materials — lead selenide (PbSe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) — and provide design rules to avoid them. More>

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Record-Breaking 45-Qubit Simulations Run at Berkeley Lab

Researchers from ETH Zurich in Switzerland used the Cori supercomputer at NERSC to simulate a 45-qubit circuit, the largest simulation of a quantum computer ever achieved. They also used the Roofline software toolkit developed in Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division to optimize the project’s code performance. More>

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Op-Ed From NERSC’s Bautista on WannaCry Attack; Talk on Cybersecurity

Elizabeth Bautista wrote an opinion piece for Sunday’s San Francisco Chronicle urging people and companies to apply patches and updates immediately to guard against the spread of malicious code, such as the WannaCry ransomware that recently crippled systems worldwide. Read the opinion piece here. A noon talk on ransomware and targeted phishing at the Lab takes place June 1 in Wang Hall, room 3101.

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Kennedy High Students Learn About Berkeley Lab Computing

Twenty students and three teachers from Richmond’s Kennedy High School IT Academy spent the morning of April 26 learning about the breadth of computing at Berkeley Lab, from desktop machines to supercomputers. “It was amazing,” said Jaime, a junior, about the NERSC supercomputer room. More>

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DOE Profiles the Namesake of the Cori Supercomputer at NERSC

Though little known, Gerty Cori was a Nobel Prize winner who unlocked the biochemical processes behind the catalysis of glycogen with her scientific and life partner Carl Cori. Her contributions were recognized by NERSC, which named its Cray XC40 supercomputer Cori in her honor. More>

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