Today at Berkeley Lab

KQED’s QUEST Features Earth Scientist and NERSC User Jennifer Holm

Holm runs climate models at NERSC to study how forests are affected by climate change and the impact the future climate. QUEST recently filmed an interview with Holm about her work as part of a series on science careers. More>

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NERSC wins HPCWire Editors’ Choice Award

NERSC was named one of two recipients of the HPCWire “Editors’ Choice Award for Best HPC Collaboration Between Government & Industry.” Announced at the SuperComputing 2014 conference held in New Orleans last week, the award recognized the center’s partnership with Cray and Intel to deploy in 2016 a manycore supercomputer. More>

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Berkeley Algorithms Help Researchers Understand Dark Energy

To unlock the mystery of dark energy and its influence on the universe, researchers must rely on indirect observations. The process of identifying and tracking these objects requires scientists to scrupulously monitor the night sky for slight changes, a task that would be extremely tedious and time-consuming without some novel computational tools developed at NERSC. More>

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‘Ask Berkeley Lab’ Question About Supercomputers is Answered

Katie Antypas of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) explains what a supercomputer is.

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How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide

A team of scientists has made an important advancement in understanding a classic transition-metal oxide, vanadium dioxide, by quantifying the thermodynamic forces driving the transformation. The results were confirmed by large-scale simulations at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. More>

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Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations

A team of researchers from Harvard, using computing resources at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), have demonstrated a mathematical toolkit that can turn cancer-mutation data into multidimensional models to show how specific mutations alter the social networks of proteins in cells. More>

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NERSC is at Forefront of Data Management and Storage Innovations

100 petabytes. That’s how much data is currently stored at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). And it’s increasing by 40 percent to 60 percent annually. That’s a far cry from the early days. In 1976, the center—then located at Lawrence Livermore Lab—could store a whopping 19,200 megabytes of data, primarily on online disks and nine-track tapes. More>

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Simulations Reveal An Unusual Death for Ancient Stars

Certain primordial stars may have died unusually. In death, these objects would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind. Supercomputer simulations at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) helped astrophysicists arrive at this conclusion. More>

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Lab Partners with Campus and UCSF in BRAINseed

The Lab is contributing both financially and intellectually to BRAINSeed, a partnership with UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco to accelerate “innovative but risky” brain research through nanoscience and optogenetic technologies. Berkeley Lab scientists and facilities such as NERSC and the Foundry will be playing key roles in these projects. More>

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Add Your Voice to The Future of the Web at WC3 Symposium

To mark the World Wide Web Consortium‘s (WC3) 20th anniversary, the group is hosting a symposium — W3C20—to discuss the future of the Web at the Santa Clara Marriott on Oct. 29. The consortium, which includes Berkeley Lab, develops open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. Go here to register and here for more on the Lab’s participation.

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