Today at Berkeley Lab

New Material Has Potential for Lower Cost, Cleaner Nuclear Fuel Recycling

Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing. By working at ambient temperature, the new material has the potential to save energy, and make reprocessing cleaner and less expensive. More>

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NERSC Fields Its 1st Student Cluster Competition Team

Five former NERSC interns and one current intern have joined forces to participate in the Student Cluster Competition at ISC16, June 20-22 in Frankfurt, Germany, marking the first time that NERSC has fielded a student cluster competition team. More>

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Could Aluminum Nitride Produce Quantum Bits?

The leading method for creating quantum bits, or qubits, currently involves exploiting structural defects in diamonds. By using supercomputers at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), University of Chicago researchers found that the same defect could be engineered in a less expensive material — aluminum nitride. More>

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Simulations Dig Deeper into Warm Dense Matter

Researchers from the University of Washington are using NERSC supercomputers and data from X-ray free-electron laser experiments to gain new insights into warm dense matter (WDM), one of the most challenging aspects of contemporary plasma physics. More>

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NERSC’s Friesen Helps Calculate Chances of Surviving Zombie Apocalypse

Hugo Villanueva, a high school student in Southern California, was trying to crunch the numbers himself, but is handheld calculator wasn’t up to the task. So he wrote a letter to Cray Inc. asking for help. The company arranged for a visit to the high school, and brought along NERSC’s Brian Friesen to assist. More>

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NERSC Simulations Reveal Material’s Superconducting Superpowers

Two-dimensional boron is a natural low-temperature superconductor and it may be the only 2D material with that potential, say Rice University researchers who discovered this trait after running simulations at NERSC. This finding could revolutionize the manufacturing of small superconducting circuits. More>

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NERSC Helps ID Mismatches in Model for Tropical Weather Disturbances

A better understanding of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a tropical disturbance that propagates eastward around the global tropics, is vital for accurately forecasting weather in Western India and the El Niño/La Niña cycle on the U.S. West Coast. That’s why researchers are using NERSC resources and field data to improve existing MJO models. More>

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Could Material Defects Actually Improve Solar Cells?

Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using supercomputers — including NERSC — to study what may seem paradoxical: certain defects in silicon solar cells may actually improve their performance. More>

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Multi-Scale Simulations Solve a Plasma Turbulence Mystery

Cutting-edge simulations run at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) over a two-year period are helping physicists better understand what influences the behavior of the plasma turbulence that is driven by the intense heating necessary to create fusion energy. More>

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NERSC Announces HPC Achievement Award Winners

The awards recognize NERSC users who have either demonstrated an innovative use of HPC resources to solve a scientific problem or whose work has had an exceptional impact on scientific understanding or society. Winners include Charles Koven and William Riley of the Lab’s Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division. More>

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