Today at Berkeley Lab

NERSC’s ‘Shifter’ Makes Container-Based HPC a Breeze

To facilitate the use of container-based computing in HPC, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is enabling Docker-like container technology on its systems through its new, customized —and soon to be open source — software tool, Shifter. More>

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Systems Engineer by Day, KALX DJ by Night

Shreyas “DJ Shrey” Cholia of the Computational Research Division and NERSC spins his unique blend of Bollywood, electronica, and garage-indie pop, for the UC Berkeley radio station every other Tuesday night. “I like finding music that crosses over from one genre to another; I’m not someone who likes to pigeon-hole myself.” More>

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MANTISSA Finds New Ways to Solve Big Data Analysis Challenges

Researchers are working to address emerging data management and analysis issues through MANTISSA, a DOE-funded program that supports development of novel algorithms to enable new software tools in various science domains to run at scale on current and next-generation supercomputers. More>

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2D and 3D Models Shed New Light on What Fuels an Exploding Star

In a study published in AIP Advances, Hix and colleagues from ORNL, University of Tennessee, Florida Atlantic University and North Carolina State University compared 3D models run at ORNL with 2D models run at NERSC to shed new light on the explosion mechanism behind core-collapse supernovae. More>

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What the Blank Makes Quantum Dots Blink?

Since their discovery in the 1980s, these remarkable nanoparticles have held out tantalizing prospects for all kinds of new technologies, from solar cells to quantum computer chips, biological markers, and even lasers and communications technologies. But there’s a problem: Quantum dots often blink. More>

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Supernova Hunting With Supercomputers

New observations suggest the origins of famously consistent Type Ia supernovae may not be uniform at all. Using theoretical calculations and supercomputer simulations, astronomers observed for the first time a flash of light caused by a supernova slamming into a nearby star, allowing them to determine where the supernova was born. More>

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NERSC, Cray Move Forward With Next-Generation Scientific Computing

NERSC and Cray Inc. announced this week that they have finalized a new contract for a Cray XC40 supercomputer that will be the first NERSC system installed in the newly built CRT facility at Berkeley Lab. This supercomputer will be used as Phase 1 of NERSC’s next-generation system, named “Cori” in honor of biochemist and Nobel Laureate Gerty Cori. More>

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Organic Photovoltaic Experiments Showcase ‘Superfacility’ Concept

Research by the Advanced Light Source, using computing resources at NERSC, Oakridge, and ESNet, is yielding exciting results in organic photovoltaics as well as road testing the “superfacility” concept, which connects DOE user facilities to enable researchers to share data in real time without having to leave their office or lab. More>

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Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students

Frank Hale recently brought a group of computer science enthusiasts from Diablo Valley College (DVC) to NERSC for a tour. They were hosted by Elizabeth Bautista; heard talks from Richard Gerber, David Skinner and Jack DeSlippe on high performance computing and how it is used at NERSC to enable a broad range of science; and took a tour of the machine room. More>

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What Makes Clouds Form, Grow, and Die?

The mechanisms behind cloud changes are quite complex, so researchers from Pacific Northwest Lab utilized NERSC supercomputing resources to simulate tropical clouds and their interaction with the warm ocean surface and compare the simulations to real-world observations. More>

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