Today at Berkeley Lab

DOE Profiles the Namesake of the Cori Supercomputer at NERSC

Though little known, Gerty Cori was a Nobel Prize winner who unlocked the biochemical processes behind the catalysis of glycogen with her scientific and life partner Carl Cori. Her contributions were recognized by NERSC, which named its Cray XC40 supercomputer Cori in her honor. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Towards Super-Efficient, Ultra-Thin, Silicon Solar Cells

Researchers have employed NERSC supercomputers to model a new crystalline solar cell architecture that could nearly match today’s efficiency, but at a fraction of the thickness. Crystalline solar cells based on this architecture would be lighter and bendable, allowing them to be installed on curved surfaces, unlike today’s typical rigid solar cell. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Machine Learning Enhances Predictive Modeling of 2-D Materials

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, using supercomputers at Berkeley Lab’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), are employing machine learning algorithms to efficiently and accurately predict the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of nanomaterials. The could help accelerate the discovery and development of new materials. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

New Materials Could Turn Water into the Fuel of the Future

In just two years, Berkeley Lab and Caltech scientists have nearly doubled the number of materials known to have potential for use in solar fuels. They did so by developing a process that promises to speed the discovery of a commercially viable generation of solar fuels. The research involved NERSC, the Molecular Foundry, and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Proposals for JGI-NERSC Microbiome Data Science Call Due March 1

The call will enable users to perform state-of-the-art computational genomics and metagenomics research and help them translate sequence information generated by the JGI or elsewhere into biological discovery. The call aims to help users perform large-scale computational analyses of sequence data to solve DOE mission-relevant problems. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Simulations Reveal the Invisible Chaos of Superluminous Supernovae

To better understand the physical conditions that create superluminious supernova — stellar explosions that shine 10 to 100 times brighter than normal — astrophysicists are running two-dimensional simulations of these events using supercomputers at NERSC and the Berkeley Lab-developed CASTRO code. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Diamond Shines in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

Diamonds are revered for their strength, beauty, and utility. But now a group of researchers, using the computing power of NERSC, are finding additional reasons to celebrate this material, particularly for industrial applications. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

More Detailed View of Vertical Cloud Structures Improve Climate Models

Using high-performance computers at NERSC, a team of researchers have improved a statistical representation of clouds in a climate model to capture clouds from all sides and in-between. They found that including the falling speed of these cloud components, along with the already-included dependency on the cloud’s turbulence strength, will improve the modelling of clouds. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Jan. 7 Memorial for NERSC Retiree William Harris

A memorial service will be held Jan. 7 at noon at the Graham-Hitch Mortuary (4167 First Street in Pleasanton) for William Harris, former head of NERSC’s Computer Operations and Network Support Group. He was among the key staff when NERSC moved from Livermore Lab to Berkeley Lab in 1996. Harris created and led the operations support group until retiring in 2004. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

NERSC Seeks Postdocs for NESAP for Data Program

The NESAP for Data program focuses on the needs of data-intensive science applications that perform processing and analysis of data from experimental or observational sources. In collaboration with science user communities, the postdoc will explore how to adapt these applications to perform data science and knowledge discovery at scale. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.