Today at Berkeley Lab

Molecular Foundry User Meeting, Aug. 11-12

Registration and abstract submission are open. Events include keynote addresses from Nobel Laureate K. Barry Sharpless (Scripps Research Institute) and Sossina M. Haile (Northwestern University), and a poster session and symposia on topics including two-dimensional matter, the challenges of imaging materials’ functionality, and product-driven research at the Foundry. More>

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Foundry User Participates in Regional Cancer Moonshot Summit

Molecular Foundry user Ambika Bumb recently participated in a Cancer Moonshot Summit hosted by Congressman Mark DeSaulnier. Bumb spoke about her company Bikanta, which uses nanoscale diamonds to accurately locate and treat cancer cells in a targeted manner, as well as the importance of federally funded national user facilities. More>

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Discovery Could Dramatically Boost Efficiency of Perovskite Solar Cells

Researchers have discovered a possible secret to dramatically boosting the efficiency of perovskite solar cells hidden in the nanoscale peaks and valleys of the crystalline material. The efficiency at which perovskite solar cells convert photons to electricity has increased more rapidly than any other material to date. More>

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Scientists See Electron Bottleneck in Simulated Battery

An international team of scientists that includes Berkeley Lab researchers has revealed how interactions between electrons and ions can slow down the performance of vanadium pentoxide, a material considered key to the next generation of batteries. More>

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June 29 Interdisciplinary Instrumentation Colloquium

Colin Ophus of the Molecular Foundry will speak on “New Kinds of Four-Dimensional Scanning Diffraction Experiments in Transmission Electron Microscopy Enabled by High-Speed Direct Electron Detectors” from noon to 1 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. More>

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New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

Researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. The technology could have wide-ranging applications for batteries, catalysis, and energetic materials. More>

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Surprising New Properties in a 2-D Semiconductor Discovered

A new class of semiconductor was discovered that is only three atoms thick and which extends in a two-dimensional plane, similar to graphene. These 2-D semiconductors, have exceptional optical characteristics, and could lead to improved semiconductors or new functionalities. More>

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Joint Foundry/ALS Seminar Featuring Christopher Kemper Ober on May 17

The Molecular Foundry and ALS will jointly host a seminar on “Fifty Years of Moore’s Law: Towards Fabrication at Molecular Dimensions” by Christopher Kemper Ober from Cornell University. The talk begins at 11 a.m. in the Building 66 Auditorium. More>

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Video Highlights of Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary

Posted on a special webpage that includes over 50 photographs and a number of news stories from the event, the three minute video features highlights of the day and thoughts from the Foundry’s Jeff Neaton, former Berkeley Lab director Paul Alivisatos, Congressman Mike Honda, and MIT’s Jeff Grossman.

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Carbon Nanotubes Move into the Fast Lane

Molecular Foundry users have shown that carbon nanotubes can transport protons faster than bulk water, by an order of magnitude. The transport rates in these nanotube pores, which form one-dimensional water wires, also exceed those of biological channels and man-made proton conductors, making carbon nanotubes the fastest known proton conductor. More>

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