Today at Berkeley Lab

Research on Extending Moore’s Law Featured on ABC 7 News

Work by Paul Ashby and Deirdre Olynick of the Molecular Foundry Patrick Naulleau at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a better photoresist, a critical material that’s used to lay down patterns of transistors across computer chips, which could continue to reduce the size of transistors and stay on track with Moore’s Law.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Foundry Researchers Share What Inspires Them on White Boards

From cake and coffee to Richard Feynman’s bongos, scientists at the Foundry’s Inorganic Nanostructures Facility answer the question “what inspires you?” in classic science fashion…a white board. Check out photos of their responses on the Lab’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Whiteboards Around the Lab…Calculations With a View

These electron transport equations were photographed by Public Affair’s Kelly Owen on the third floor of the Molecular Foundry. Do you know of a cool whiteboard you’d like to share with the Lab? If so, contact Owen at kjowen@lbl.gov.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Foundry Helps Researchers Target Embryonic Stem Cell Sugars

Working at the Molecular Foundry, scientists from UC San Diego created a molecular mimic of the sugar-decorated proteins that help mouse embryonic stem cells develop into nerve cells. The goal is to better understand how cell surface sugars influence stem cell differentiation into specific cell types. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Material Acts as Alcohol Factory

Refining natural gas into an easy-to-transport, easy-to-store liquid alcohol has so far been a logistic and economic challenge. But now, a new material, designed and patented by Berkeley Lab researchers is making this process a little easier. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

Computer chips have gotten smaller thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years is called Moore’s Law. But one component of the chip-making process needs of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Foundry/NCEM Host Annual User Meeting August 25-26

Event includes keynotes, workshops, poster presentations, and networking opportunities. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Materials Scientists Demo ‘Peppytide’ Protein Models at Maker Faire

Ron Zuckerman and Promita Chakraborty of the Materials Sciences Division were among the more than 900 exhibitors who participated in … More»

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Berkeley Lab Takes Over DOE’s Instagram Account

Yesterday, the Public Affairs Department was given the keys to the Department of Energy’s Instagram account, a popular photo-sharing site. The occasion was used to capture a day in the life of Molecular Foundry Director Jeff Neaton, from his bus ride to work, to seminars and meetings, to conversations around a whiteboard (and of course a turkey sighting). See out the photos here, and check out Berkeley Lab’s Instagram account. Got ideas about ways to use social media to highlight Berkeley Lab? Contact Kelly Owen.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Four Lab Scientists Receive DOE Early Career Awards

Four Berkeley Lab scientists are among the 35 researchers selected by the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Science to receive significant funding for research as part of DOE’s Early Career Research Program. Lab awardees include (clockwise) the Chemical Sciences Division’s Rebecca Abergel, the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division’s Daniele Filippetto, the Material Sciences Division’s Alexander Weber‐Bargioni, and the Life Sciences Division’s Trent Northen. The effort, now in its fifth year, is designed to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early career years, when many scientists do their most formative work. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.