Today at Berkeley Lab

Molecular Foundry Winter Seminar Series Begins Jan. 19

The series features a lineup of eight distinguished speakers whose research interests span the field of nanoscience. Seminars take place in the Foundry’s Chemla Room (67-3111) on Tuesdays at 11 a.m. Joshua Robinson from Penn St. will headline the group as the Joint Foundry/ALS seminar speaker on Feb. 16, a talk that will be held in the Building 66 Auditorium. More>

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Foundry’s Urban Writes Commentary on Prospects for Thermoelectricity

In the December issue of Nature Nanotechnology, Jeff Urban of the Molecular Foundry pens a commentary on the possible advantages of using soft and hybrid nanocrystalline materials as next-generation thermoelectric devices, and the outstanding materials and conceptual challenges yet to be solved. More>

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Foundry User X-Therma Wins Patrick Soon-Shiong Innovation Award

The company was recognized for their radical new highway of non-toxic, hyper-effective antifreeze agents to fight unwanted ice formation in regenerative medicine, advanced formulation cosmetics, enhanced quality frozen food, and industrial deicing applications using nature-inspired, biomimetic nanoscience. More>

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Nov. 24 Talk on Rosetta Disk and Strategies for Long-Term Archiving

Laura Welcher of the Long Now Foundation will discuss efforts to create an archive of language and culture that will last for thousands of years. Welcher, a Foundry user, is addressing digital obsolescence through a 7 cm disk containing over 13,000 pages of documentation on over 1,500 languages. The talk is at 11 a.m. in the Foundry’s Chemla Room. More>

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Battery Mystery Solved: Microscopy Answers Longstanding Questions

Using complementary microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, Lab researchers Alpesh Shukla
and Colin Olphus say they have solved the structure of lithium- and manganese-rich transition
metal oxides, a potentially game-changing battery material and the subject of intense debate in
the decade since it was discovered. More>

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Molecular Foundry on Capitol Hill

The Molecular Foundry’s Jeff Neaton and Branden Brough, Ambika Bumb with Bikanta, UCLA’s Chris Regan, and Government Affair’s Don Medley briefed members of Congress and staff on how nanoscale science drives innovations across many fields and the key role of DOE’s Nanoscale Research Centers. Rep. Zoe Lofgren blogged about the meeting.

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PIMs May Be Cup of Choice for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

Brett Helms at the Molecular Foundry led the development of a membrane made from polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) that extends the life and improves the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries. The subnanometer pore sizes of PIMs dramatically reduce the uncontrolled migration of polysulfide ions through the membrane that separates a battery’s electrodes. More>

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Molecular Foundry Featured in Special Issue of Advanced Materials

On October 14, 2015, the entire issue of the scientific journal Advanced Materials (Impact Factor: 17.5) was dedicated to the work of the Molecular Foundry. The issue includes 18 articles by staff and users, seven pieces of cover art and an editorial on multidisciplinary research by Foundry Director, Jeff Neaton. More>

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New ‘Design Rule’ Brings Nature-Inspired Nanostructures Closer

Scientists aspire to build nanostructures that mimic the complexity and function of proteins, but consist of durable and synthetic materials and can be customized into sensitive chemical detectors or long-lasting catalysts. A new design-rule discovery is a step in that direction. More>

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A Different Type of 2D Semiconductor

Peidong Yang has produced the first atomically thin 2D sheets of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites. These ionic materials exhibit optical properties not found in 2D covalent semiconductors such as graphene, making them promising alternatives to silicon for future electronic devices. More>

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