Today at Berkeley Lab

Carbon Nanotubes Move into the Fast Lane

Molecular Foundry users have shown that carbon nanotubes can transport protons faster than bulk water, by an order of magnitude. The transport rates in these nanotube pores, which form one-dimensional water wires, also exceed those of biological channels and man-made proton conductors, making carbon nanotubes the fastest known proton conductor. More>

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Nature-Inspired Nanotubes That Assemble Themselves With Precision

Lab scientists have discovered a family of nature-inspired polymers that, when placed in water, spontaneously assemble into hollow crystalline nanotubes with a uniform diameter. The research involved the Molecular Foundry’s Ron Zuckermann, Nitash Balsara of the Materials Sciences Division, and Ken Downing of the Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division. More>

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Foundry Symposium Highlights 10 Years of Achievement

The event included talks by Foundry Director Jeff Neaton, past and present lab directors, users, and Congressman Mike Honda (pictured). Topics included the use of the facility for research on nanophotonics, nanocrystal probes for biological and medical applications, and the use of computer simulations for materials design. More>

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Watch Foundry Researcher Live in Her Lab on March 28 at 10:30 a.m.

Join Ambika Bumb and team live on Periscope at 10:30 a.m to learn how scientists at the Molecular Foundry are using nanodiamonds to see cancer. Click here at 10:30 a.m. You do not need to have a twitter account to watch.

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Message From Director Witherell on Molecular Foundry Anniversary

This week we are celebrating the many scientific breakthroughs made possible by the Molecular Foundry in its ten years of operation. It is a good time for us as a Laboratory to consider why this new scientific user facility developed so quickly into a scientific powerhouse and what that means for us in thinking about future facilities. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Ten

In 2015, a team of staff and users at the Molecular Foundry developed a technique to measure the 3-D position of individual atoms in a given sample with a precision of 19 picometers, or 19 trillionths of a meter. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Nine

In 2014, Molecular Foundry scientists, in collaboration with the semiconductor industry and Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, pioneer a new approach to miniaturizing nanofabricated devices like transistors. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Eight

In 2013, research into nanocrystals, whose transmittance properties change when charged with electricity, led to the development of “smart windows,” which can selectively filter light and heat as it passes through them. Smart windows research led to the creation of a company called Heliotrope. The next highlight appears in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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New Carbon Capture Membrane Boasts CO2 Highways

A new, highly permeable carbon capture membrane could lead to more efficient ways of separating carbon dioxide from power plant exhaust, preventing greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Seven

In 2012, Molecular Foundry scientists developed the award-winning “Campanile tip,” a nano-optical probe that enables imaging at molecular scales and is named after the iconic tower on the UC Berkeley campus. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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