Today at Berkeley Lab

Bacterial Armor Holds Clues for Self-Assembling Nanostructures

The Molecular Foundry’s Caroline Ajo-Franklin and Behzad Rad led a study that uncovered key details in the process by which bacterial proteins self-assemble into a protective coating, like chainmail armor. This process can be a model for the self-assembly of 2D and 3D nanostructures. More>

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New Molecular Foundry Logo Released

Following the merge of the Molecular Foundry and the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) at the start of FY 2015, a new logo has been created to represent the newly integrated center. Signifying a sense of place that integrates seven distinct scientific facilities, the new logo features a clean and modern look inspired by the Foundry’s architecture.

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Why Oxygen is Kryptonite to Titanium

Materials scientist Andrew Minor led a team that revealed the mechanism by which titanium becomes brittle with the addition of a few extra atoms of oxygen. This discovery could open the door to more practical, cost-effective uses of titanium, including the construction, automotive and aerospace industries. More>

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Molecular Foundry Seminar Series Launches Feb. 3

The series feature researchers speaking on such topics as imaging bonds and chemical reactions, responsive nanostructured optical materials, and drug discovery at novel allosteric sites. The Tuesday talks begin at 11 a.m. in Building 67-3111 (except where noted). Go here to view the complete schedule.

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Possible Avenue to Better Electrolyte for Lithium Ion Batteries

Rich Saykally, David Prendergast, and Steve Harris, conducted the first X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of a model electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries. The results show a pathway forward to improving lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles and large-scale electrical energy storage. More>

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Mimicking Nature for Homeland Security

The Molecular Foundry’s Ron Zuckermann is designing two-dimensional peptoid nanosheets — a material made of biomimetic polymers, two molecules thick — that could one day be used to make sensors that detect lethal chemical agents or deadly viruses deployed during warfare or a terrorist attack. More>

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MSD Researchers Talk Materials Sciences With Local High School Students

Nick Borys, Alex Buyanin, and David Garfield shared with students at Los Lomas High School in Walnut Creek what it’s like to work “in the invisible realm” at the Molecular Foundry. They also shared tips on studying materials sciences in college. More>

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Nanotubes that Insert Themselves into Cell Membranes

Lab researchers have helped show that short carbon nanotubes can make excellent artificial pores within cell membranes. Moreover, these nanotubes, which are far more rugged than their biological counterparts, can self-insert into a cell membrane or other lipid bilayers. More>

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New Insights on Carbonic Acid in Water

Rich Saykally of the Chemical Sciences Division, along with David Prendergast of the Molecular Foundry, led a study that provided valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns. Carbonic acid is critical to both the health of the atmosphere and human body. More>

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Foundry’s Peppytide Models a Hit at Mini Maker Faire

Ron Zuckermann, Allison Chen, and Julien Muzard demonstrated the basics of protein folding using to attendees at the East Bay Mini Maker Faire last Sunday.

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