Today at Berkeley Lab

Foundry’s Sinéad Griffin Wins First Place in Inaugural Lab-Wide Research Slam

Sinéad Griffin (center), an early-career staff scientist who specializes in condensed matter physics at the Molecular Foundry and the Materials Sciences Division, won first place and a cash price of $3,000 at the first annual Lab-Wide Research Slam last Thursday. Shyam Dwaraknath (left, Energy Technologies Area) won the second-place prize of $1,500, and Michele Rosso of the Computing Sciences Area won the People’s Choice Award of $750. More>

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Gut Bacteria’s Shocking Secret: They Produce Electricity

UC Berkeley scientists discovered that a common diarrhea-causing bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes, produces electricity using an entirely different technique from known electrogenic bacteria, and that hundreds of other bacterial species use this same process. The scientists worked with the Lab’s Caroline Ajo-Franklin on this research. More>

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In the Transition From Metal to Insulator, Missing Oxygen Atoms Matter

The ability of certain advanced materials to switch from being metallic to insulating could be useful for building next-generation electronic devices. But how can this transition be controlled? Researchers have used the Advanced Light Source to show that, in one engineered material, defects in the form of missing oxygen atoms can serve as a “tuning knob” for the metal-to-insulator transition. More>

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Foundry Fall Seminar Series Begins Sept. 11

The next Molecular Foundry Seminar Series features a lineup of eight distinguished speakers whose research interests span the field of nanoscience. The series occurs every Tuesday at 11 a.m. in Bldg. 67-3111, starting on Sept. 11. The Oct. 16 talk features Irfan Siddiqi, who will discuss QIS (Quantum Information Science) research efforts at the Lab and UC Berkeley. More>

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Q&A With Energy Sciences ALD Jeff Neaton

As part of its “Ringleader” series, the Advanced Light Source recently conducted a Q&A with Associate Lab Director for Energy Sciences Jeff Neaton. He discusses his career track, research interests, vision for the Energy Sciences Area, and what he likes to do in his spare time, such as riding bikes with his 7-year-old daughter. More>

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Getting a Charge Out of MOFs

Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have made a metal organic framework (MOF) with the highest electron charge mobilities ever observed, along with a technique to improve the conductivity of other MOFs. To work around MOFs’ inherently low electrical conductivity, the researchers added a potassium chemical mix to an iron benzenedipyrazolate MOF. More>

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Light-Emitting Nanoparticles Could Provide Safer Way to Image Living Cells

A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles, developed at Berkeley Lab, can be used to see deep in living tissue. Researchers hope they can be made to attach to specific components of cells to serve in an advanced imaging system that can pinpoint even single cancer cells. More>

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Foundry User Meeting to Impact Cafeteria Seating and Parking in H-2 Lot

The Molecular Foundry User Meeting on Aug. 15 and 16 will require the closure of the H-2 parking lot (next to Building 70) starting at 5 p.m. on Aug. 14 through Aug. 16. Carpool parking will be moved to the H-1 lot. The cafeteria will operate as usual, but tables in the dining hall will be cleared starting 2 p.m. on Aug. 15.

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Building 67 Update

Portions of Building 67 (Molecular Foundry) were reopened in stages on Thursday. Aug. 9, as Foundry and Lab EHS teams performed walkthrough inspections to identify potential remaining hazards. Water damage was found to be minimal. As of 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 9, Building 67 had resumed normal operations except for restrictions in specific labs and offices. More>

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Scientists ‘Squeeze’ Nanocrystals Into a Solid-Like State – Then Reverse the Process

A team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab found a way to make a liquid-like state behave more like a solid – then reverse it. A droplet of a liquid containing iron oxide nanocrystals, put into an oily liquid containing tiny polymer strands, results in a tiny tug of war on nanoparticles at the intersection of the liquids. More>

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