Today at Berkeley Lab

A New Look at Surface Chemistry

Jim Ciston, at the Molecular Foundry’s NCEM, led a multi-institutional team that has developed a highly promising technique called “high-resolution scanning electron microscopy,” or HRSEM. This new technique holds promise for the study of catalysis, corrosion and other critical chemical reactions. More>

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Using Robots at the Molecular Foundry, Scientists Assemble Promising Antimicrobial Compounds

There’s an urgent demand for new antimicrobial compounds that are effective against constantly emerging drug-resistant bacteria. Two robotic chemical-synthesizing machines at the Molecular Foundry, named Symphony X and Overture, have joined the search. Their specialty is creating custom nanoscale structures that mimic nature’s proven designs.

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Registration Open for Molecular Foundry User Meeting

The event takes place August 20-21 and is open to researchers from academia, industry, and government labs and includes keynote and contributed talks, poster session, and vendor fair. Topics for breakout talks include soft matter assembly and dynamics, brain imaging and optical manipulation, and SAXS-WAXS for nanomaterials. More>

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Former Foundry Researcher ‘Cycling for Science’ Featured on NBC News

Rachel Woods-Robinson and her cycling partner have been on their cross-country trip for about two weeks and have around 14 states to go. They are visiting middle schools along the way teaching fun lessons in physics and celebrating STEM teachers. More>

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Molecular Foundry’s Francesca Morabito Leads New Italian Society

The Molecular Foundry’s Francesca Morabito is the new Director of Academic and Networking Activities at the newly formed Italian Society at UC Berkeley. The group promotes Italian culture in the UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab.

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Lab Staff Participate in ‘Small Act-Big Impact’ Earth Day Campaign

Branden Brough of the Molecular Foundry commutes to work in an electric vehicle, and Linda Vu (pictured) of Computing composts and recycles. These small acts were featured on the Lab’s Twitter feed as part of Los Alamos Lab’s “My Small Act” Earth Day campaign.

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On the Road to Spin-Orbitronics

Materials scientists Gong Chen and Andreas Schmid have found a new way of manipulating the walls that define magnetic domains — used for e-mail, posting images, and downloading videos or music — and the results could one day revolutionize the electronics industry. More>

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Foundry Group Attends Upward Bound Nanoscience Conference

Last weekend, Molecular Foundry senior staff scientist Ron Zuckermann and two of his undergraduate students presented at the Upward Bound Nanoscience conference. This is a college prep program for Bay Area high school students. They presented a lecture on the Wonders of Nanoscience and did a few demos. More>

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Research Could Lead to More Efficient Electrical Energy Storage

Researchers have identified electrical charge-induced changes in the structure and bonding of graphitic carbon electrodes that may one day affect the way energy is stored. Berkeley Lab researchers worked with colleagues from Lawrence Livermore to create an improvement in the capacity and efficiency of electrical energy storage systems, such as batteries and supercapacitors. More>

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Bacterial Armor Holds Clues for Self-Assembling Nanostructures

The Molecular Foundry’s Caroline Ajo-Franklin and Behzad Rad led a study that uncovered key details in the process by which bacterial proteins self-assemble into a protective coating, like chainmail armor. This process can be a model for the self-assembly of 2D and 3D nanostructures. More>

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