Today at Berkeley Lab

2D Transistors Promise a Faster Electronics Future

Faster electronic device architectures are in the offing with the unveiling of the world’s first fully two-dimensional field-effect transistor. More>

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Unexpected Water Explains Surface Chemistry of Nanocrystals

Researchers have found unexpected traces of water in semiconducting nanocrystals that help answer long-standing questions about their surface chemistry. More>

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Lab’s Javey and Chang on Short List for Prestigeous Blavatnik Awards

Finalists were selected from a field of 300 nominees, all faculty-rank researchers aged 42 or younger from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. More>

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In Memoriam: Engineer Chris Ramsey (1965-2014)

Chris Ramsey, an engineer who worked on programs in the Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Nuclear Science Divisions, passed away on April 19 after a brief bout with cancer. He was 49 years old. He was a member of the Life Sciences Radiotracer Development and Imaging Technologies group and the Materials Sciences Scintillator Discovery and Development group. He joined the Lab in 2000. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, June 14, at 1 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley (1 Lawson Road, Kensington, CA). Go here to read a remembrance written by his colleagues.

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Lighting the Way to Graphene-Based Devices

Feng Wang (center) of the Materials Sciences Division led a study in which semiconductors made from graphene and boron nitride (GBN) heterostructures were charge-doped to alter their electronic properties using only visible light. Photo-induced doping was used to create p–n junctions and other useful doping profiles in these GBN heterostructures while preserving the material’s remarkably high electron mobility. As electron conductors, GBN heterostructures are almost as fast as pure graphene, but unlike pure graphene,are well-suited for making devices. Other Berkeley contributors to this study were Long Ju (left), Jairo Velasco Jr. (right), Edwin Huang, Salman Kahn, Casey Nosiglia, Hsin-Zon Tsai, Michael Crommie and Alex Zettl. More>

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Research Finds Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Bone Quality

Vitamin D deficiency is a widespread medical condition that plays a major role in human bone health. Scientists know that a lack of vitamin D can cause bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Now a team of researchers working at the ALS has also found that vitamin D deficiency plays a significant role in the bone-aging process. Low levels of vitamin D, the “sunshine vitamin,” have been previously linked to the health and fracture risk of human bone on the basis of low calcium intake and reduced bone density. The recent ALS research demonstrates that vitamin D deficiency also reduces bone quality. More>

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Computer Security Expert Speaks at Nano-High Tomorrow

The final NanoHigh talk this year takes place tomorrow at 10 a.m. in 1 Pimentel Hall on the Berkeley campus. The speaker is Professor of Computer Science David Wagner. He will talk about the critical need for effective computer security and about the occurrence of its all too frequent failures. As a grad student, Wagner discovered flaws in the Netscape browser and since then has worked on a variety of aspects of computer security, including wireless security, sensor network security, and applied cryptography. His work now focuses on secure electronic voting and security systems for smartphones and wearable devices. Lab staff are urged to encourage their high school-age children to attend. More>

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Ali Javey Wins Young Investigator Award from Nano Letters

Ali Javey, with the Materials Sciences Division, has been named the winner of the 2014 Nano LettersYoung Investigator Lectureship. Nano Letters, a weekly journal published by the American Chemical Society (ACS), established this award to “honor the contributions of a young investigator who has made major impacts on the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.” Javey has been a leader in the development of e-skin, e-whiskers and other flexible, or “plastic,” electronic devices that hold promise for a wide range of applications, including solar cells and smart-pads that can be folded like paper. Javey will give an award lecture at the Fall 2014 ACS National Meeting in San Francisco. More>

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Probing for Better Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

Nanocrystals imageDelia Milliron of the Materials Sciences Division led a study at the Molecular Foundry in which it was shown that when doping a semiconductor to alter its electrical properties, equally important as the amount of dopant is how the dopant is distributed on the surface and throughout the material. Working with the semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) and beams from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Milliron’s team were able to correlate the distribution of tin, the dopant, with ITO’s optical properties. Also working on this study were Sebastien Lounis, Evan Runnerstorm, Amy Bergerud and Dennis Nordlund. More>

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Edgy Look at 2D Molybdenum Disulfide

Xiang Zhang of the Materials Sciences Division, and a member of the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, led a study in which a new imaging technique, based on second harmonic generation (SHG), was used to record the first observations of a strong nonlinear optical resonance along the edges of single layers of molybdenum disulfide. The existence of these edge states is key to the use of molybdenum disulfide in nanoelectronics, as well as a catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction in fuel cells, desulfurization, and other chemical reactions. Working with Zhang on this study were Xiaobo Yin, Ziliang Ye, Daniel Chenet, Yu Ye, Kevin O’Brien and James Hone. More>

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