Today at Berkeley Lab

New Light-Activated Catalyst Grabs CO2 to Make Ingredients for Fuel

Scientists have created a “spongy,” light-activated material that converts carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, which can be further turned into liquid fuels and other useful products without generating unwanted byproducts. This development could help mitigate levels of a potent greenhouse gas while generating solar-powered fuel. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Alivisatos Named UC Berkeley Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost

Paul Alivisatos, an internationally renowned chemist and UC Berkeley’s vice chancellor for research, has been chosen to serve as the campus’s new executive vice chancellor and provost, effective immediately. Alivisatos is a Berkeley Lab materials scientist and former Lab director. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Could This Strategy Bring High-Speed Communications to the Deep Sea?

Researchers are proposing a new method for sending acoustic waves through water that could dramatically increase communication speeds for scuba divers, deep-sea robots, and remote ocean monitors. By taking advantage of the dynamic rotation generated as waves travel, more channels were packed onto a single frequency, effectively increasing the amount of information capable of being transmitted. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

New Class of ‘Soft’ Semiconductors Could Transform HD Displays

New research could help usher in a new generation of high-definition displays, optoelectronic devices, photodetectors, and more. A class of “soft” semiconductors can be used to emit multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers. The work could challenge quantum dot displays that rely upon traditional semiconductor nanocrystals to emit light. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Sound Waves Direct Particles to Self-Assemble, Self-Heal

Lab scientists have demonstrated how floating particles will assemble and synchronize in response to acoustic waves. Their simple experiment provides a new framework for studying how seemingly lifelike behaviors emerge in response to external forces. The work could help address fundamental questions about energy dissipation and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Omar Yaghi Wins Einstein Award from the World Cultural Council

Omar Yaghi of the Materials Sciences Division has been selected as the winner of the Albert Einstein World Award of Science. He was recognized for his contributions to the creation of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), as well as establishing the new field reticular chemistry. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Yaghi Wins Royal Society of Chemistry Award

Lab materials scientist Omar Yaghi is the society’s Spiers Memorial Award winner for 2017. The award recognizes outstanding contribution to the chemical sciences. Award winners are evaluated for the originality and impact of their research as well as the quality of the results. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Scientists Help Thin-Film Ferroelectrics Go Extreme

Scientists have created the first-ever polarization gradient in thin-film ferroelectrics, greatly expanding the range of functional temperatures for a key material used in a variety of everyday applications. The discovery could pave the way for developing devices capable of supporting wireless communications in extreme environments. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Materials Scientist Marvin Cohen Receives Franklin Medal

The Franklin Institute Awards were founded in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin in 1824. Cohen was recognized “for making possible atomic-scale calculations of the properties of materials so detailed that new materials and their mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties can be predicted in agreement with experiments.” More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

MSD Hosts Workshop on ‘New Scientific Directions With Ultrafast Electrons’

A range of topics was covered at the May 5 event, from femtosecond electron diffraction from molecules in the gas phase and 2D condensed matter, to imaging high-velocity acoustic phonons and materials transformations with ultrafast electron microscopy. The Lab is focused on developing tools that significantly augment existing core materials and chemical sciences programs. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.