Today at Berkeley Lab

Solar Energy Breakthrough Could Drop Consumer Price

New semiconductors manufacturing method could make solar power competitive with fossil fuels. More>

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Manipulating and Detecting Ultrahigh Frequency Sound Waves

Researchers demonstrate advance in controlling nano-scale vibrations at 10 GHz. More>

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Producing Hyperpolarized Xenon Gas on a Microfluidic Chip

New devices will be smaller, cheaper and more portable. More>

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Researchers Create Nanoparticle Thin Films That Self-Assemble in One Minute

What used to take scientists hours to form can now be done in one minute. More>

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Evolution of a Bimetallic Nanocatalyst

Development could help improve the way fuels and chemicals are synthesized from natural gas, coal, or plant biomass. More>

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2D Transistors Promise a Faster Electronics Future

Faster electronic device architectures are in the offing with the unveiling of the world’s first fully two-dimensional field-effect transistor. More>

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Unexpected Water Explains Surface Chemistry of Nanocrystals

Researchers have found unexpected traces of water in semiconducting nanocrystals that help answer long-standing questions about their surface chemistry. More>

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Lab’s Javey and Chang on Short List for Prestigeous Blavatnik Awards

Finalists were selected from a field of 300 nominees, all faculty-rank researchers aged 42 or younger from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. More>

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In Memoriam: Engineer Chris Ramsey (1965-2014)

Chris Ramsey, an engineer who worked on programs in the Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Nuclear Science Divisions, passed away on April 19 after a brief bout with cancer. He was 49 years old. He was a member of the Life Sciences Radiotracer Development and Imaging Technologies group and the Materials Sciences Scintillator Discovery and Development group. He joined the Lab in 2000. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, June 14, at 1 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley (1 Lawson Road, Kensington, CA). Go here to read a remembrance written by his colleagues.

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Lighting the Way to Graphene-Based Devices

Feng Wang (center) of the Materials Sciences Division led a study in which semiconductors made from graphene and boron nitride (GBN) heterostructures were charge-doped to alter their electronic properties using only visible light. Photo-induced doping was used to create p–n junctions and other useful doping profiles in these GBN heterostructures while preserving the material’s remarkably high electron mobility. As electron conductors, GBN heterostructures are almost as fast as pure graphene, but unlike pure graphene,are well-suited for making devices. Other Berkeley contributors to this study were Long Ju (left), Jairo Velasco Jr. (right), Edwin Huang, Salman Kahn, Casey Nosiglia, Hsin-Zon Tsai, Michael Crommie and Alex Zettl. More>

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