Today at Berkeley Lab

Gerd Ceder Wins IBA Research Award

Materials scientist Gerd Ceder received the 2017 Research Award from the International Battery Association (IBA). This award recognizes “individuals who have made outstanding accomplishments in battery research.” Ceder will receive the award and deliver a plenary lecture in March at the 2017 meeting of the IBA in Nara, Japan. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Graphene Technique Could Help ‘See’ Electrical Signaling in Heart, Nerve Cells

Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive camera system in visually mapping tiny electric fields. They hope to enlist the new method to image electrical signaling networks in our hearts and brains. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Berkeley Innovators Named Fellows of National Academy of Inventors

The Lab’s Paul Alivisatos, Amy Herr, and Enrique Iglesia were among 175 inductees. Election is a “distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.” More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Matter of Degrees: How Hot It Gets Still Depends on Us

In this article about climate change that appeared in UC Berkeley’s alumni magazine “California,” the author interviews Lab researchers Inez Fung, who explores how CO2 circulates through the planet’s oceans and land-based ecologies, and Jeffrey Long, who creates MOFs, which could become a crucial tool for capturing CO2 emissions at the source. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Improved Characterization of New Materials Could Lead to New Batteries

Lab researchers have developed a rigorous mathematical method that enables better prediction and characterization of crystal structures in materials. They tackled a longstanding theoretical problem in the Ising model, the simplest theoretical description of interacting magnetic spins. Their methodology can lead to a major boost in the discovery of novel battery materials. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Yaghi Awarded Turkish Academy of Sciences Prize

The Turkish Academy of Sciences (TÜBA) has awarded one of three 2016 Academy Prizes to Lab materials scientist Omar Yaghi. Yaghi won in the category of basic and engineering sciences, in recognition of his work in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

KGO TV Speaks With Balsara on Making Lithium Batteries Safer

Lab materials scientist Nitash Balsara and colleagues are studying ways of making lithium batteries safer. The problem is in the news since the global recall of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7. He says that their research goal is to replace the battery’s flammable electrolyte with something safer. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

New Study on Metastability Clears Path for Next-Generation Materials

Lab researchers have published a new study in Science Advances that, for the first time, explicitly quantifies the thermodynamic scale of metastability for almost 30,000 known materials. This paves the way for designing and making promising next-generation materials for use in everything from semiconductors to pharmaceuticals to steels. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Major Advance in Solar Cells Made of Cheap, Easy-to-Use Perovskite

Solar cells made from an inexpensive and increasingly popular material called perovskite can more efficiently turn sunlight into electricity using a new technique to sandwich two types of perovskite into a single photovoltaic cell. “We have set the record now for different parameters of perovskite solar cells, including the efficiency,” said Lab materials scientist Alex Zettl. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

New Technique Boosts Stability, Efficiency of Solar Cells

Scientists have found a way to engineer the atomic-scale chemical properties of a water-splitting catalyst for integration with a solar cell, and the result is a big boost to the stability and efficiency of artificial photosynthesis. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.