Today at Berkeley Lab

MSD Hosts Workshop on ‘New Scientific Directions With Ultrafast Electrons’

A range of topics was covered at the May 5 event, from femtosecond electron diffraction from molecules in the gas phase and 2D condensed matter, to imaging high-velocity acoustic phonons and materials transformations with ultrafast electron microscopy. The Lab is focused on developing tools that significantly augment existing core materials and chemical sciences programs. More>

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MSD’s Rob Ritchie Elected as Fellow of the Royal Society

Ritchie is one of 10 new foreign members to receive this prestigious recognition for their outstanding contributions to science. He was recognized for his “research into the mechanics and micro-mechanisms of fracture and fatigue of a broad range of structural and biological materials, where he has provided a microstructural basis for their damage-tolerance and fatigue resistance.” More>

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John Clarke Named to American Philosophical Society

Clarke, an affiliate in the Materials Sciences Division, was recognized for his work on superconductivity, particularly the development and application of ultrasensitive SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices). The APS, the first learned society in the United States, was established more than 250 years. More>

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Scientists Discover New Atomically Layered, Thin Magnet 

Scientists have found an unexpected magnetic property in a 2-D material. The new atomically thin, flat magnet could have major implications for a wide range of applications, such as nanoscale memory, spintronic devices, and magnetic sensors. More>

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Scientists Pull Water Out of Thin Air

Berkeley and MIT scientists have demonstrated breakthrough technology capable of generating liters of water out of dry air using the power of the sun. The development is a major step toward a future of personal, off-grid sources of water. More>

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Gabor Somorjai Wins ACS Richards Medal

Gabor Somorjai of the Materials Sciences Division is the recipient of the 2016 Theodore William Richards Medal. The award by the Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society (NESACS) is given for “conspicuous achievements in chemistry.” Somorjai received the award, the oldest and most prestigious of NESACS, at the society’s recent meeting at Harvard University. More>

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Yablonovitch Receives Cherry Award for Solar Cell Research

Eli Yablonovitch of the Materials Sciences Division has received the William R. Cherry Award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He was recognized for “contributions in research, engineering and entrepreneurship to realize photovoltaic technologies capturing the “ins and outs” of photons and application of these technologies in silicon and III-V solar cells.” More>

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Sweating it Out for Science

Sweating it out on a treadmill, or racing to finish a half-marathon, a runner might risk a potentially dangerous buildup of electrolytes in their blood. In a campus lab that’s been converted into a high-tech mini-fitness center, researchers led by Lab materials scientist Ali Javey can now trace these metabolic changes second by second in a substance any good workout produces…sweat. More>

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‘Editing’ New Metamaterials Brings Light Into Focus

Materials scientist Jie Yao has developed a technique to readily change the structure of thin sheets of “metamaterials” so that they can focus light in an entirely new way, allowing smart phones to be both thin and take high-quality photographs. More>

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A Chain Reaction to Spare the Air

Last year, materials scientist Jeff Long devised a new material that captures and releases CO2 at a lower temperature and in greater volume than current technologies. He’s now working to synthesize the new material at a large scale, to render it into pellet form, and confirm its increased CO2 capture performance under realistic conditions. More>

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