Today at Berkeley Lab

New Design Tool for Metamaterials

Xiang Zhang of the Materials Sciences Division led a study showing that a nonlinear scattering theory can serve as a valuable tool in the design of metamaterials, artificial nanostructures engineered with electromagnetic properties not found in nature. Metamaterials hold promise for high-resolution optical microscopes and superfast optical computers. More>

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Materials Scientist Omar Yaghi Wins Faisal Prize for Science

The 2015 King Faisal International Prize for Science was awarded to Omar Yaghi of the Materials Sciences Division for his “seminal contributions in the field of metal organic frameworks (MOFs).” Yaghi is co-director of Kavli ENSI. More>

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Precision Growth of Light-Emitting Nanowires

A novel approach to growing nanowires promises a new means of control over their light-emitting and electronic properties. Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated a new growth technique that uses specially engineered catalysts. These catalysts have given scientists more options than ever in turning the color of light-emitting nanowires. More>

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Material Science Division’s Cheng Hao Wu Wins Safety Hero Card Raffle

Cheng Hao Wu is one of two lucky winners in the most recent Hero Card raffle. His proactive approach to clearing a workbench was noticed by a colleague, who handed him a Hero Card for doing the right thing. In addition to a Hero Card “Thank You,” Chenghao received $50 for winning the raffle. More>

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Why Oxygen is Kryptonite to Titanium

Materials scientist Andrew Minor led a team that revealed the mechanism by which titanium becomes brittle with the addition of a few extra atoms of oxygen. This discovery could open the door to more practical, cost-effective uses of titanium, including the construction, automotive and aerospace industries. More>

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Rediscovering Spontaneous Light Emission

Materials scientist Eli Yablonovitch led a team that used an external optical antenna to greatly enhance the spontaneous emission of light from a semiconductor nanorod. This advance opens the door to light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that can replace lasers for short-range optical communications. More>

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Early Stage Work Shows Graphene Could be Used as a Semiconductor

A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab materials scientist Lane Martin has found a way to control the movement and placement of electrons in graphene. The finding represents a significant step forward for graphene as an advanced substitute for silicon in semiconductors and integrated circuits. More>

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A New Pathway to Valleytronics

A potential avenue to quantum computing currently generating buzz in the high-tech industry is “valleytronics,” in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors. Now, a promising new pathway to valleytronic technology has been uncovered by Feng Wang. More>

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What Makes a Hit Song? ‘Hooktheory’ May Hold the Key

Materials scientists Chris Anderson, Ryan Miyakawa, and Dave Carlton (who recently left the Lab) have analyzed the chords and melodies to more than 1,300 sections of popular songs from countless genres and eras. Then, they sifted through the data for patterns and trends, hoping to develop tools allowing aspiring songwriters to follow suit. More>

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Solving an Organic Semiconductor Mystery

Naomi Ginsberg of the Materials Sciences and the Physical Biosciences Divisions led a team that identified the mysterious source of performance issues that can plague organic semiconductors as nanocrystallites in domain interfaces. More>

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