Today at Berkeley Lab

Lin-Wang Wang wins time at DOE Leadership Computing Facility

Materials Scientist Lin-Wang Wang was awarded 25 million hours of processing time by the DOE’s Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program. He will conduct ab initio simulations of carrier transports in organic and inorganic nanosystems at Oak Ridge Lab’s supercomputer facilities. More>

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Review of Bioinspired Structural Materials Goes Viral

Videos on the Internet going viral are a weekly occurrence but scientific review articles going viral in journals such as Nature are quite rare. Materials scientists Robert Ritchie and Tony Tomsia authored an article on the amazing structural and mechanical characteristics found in natural materials, which received thousands of views and downloads. More>

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Marvin Cohen Receives Materials Society’s Highest Honor

Cohen received the 2014 Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society for “explaining and predicting properties of materials and for successfully predicting new materials using microscopic quantum theory.” He is a senior scientist in the Materials Sciences Division UC Berkeley University Professor. More>

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Golden Approach to High-Speed DNA Reading

Alex Zettl of the Materials Sciences Division in collaboration with Luke Lee at UC Berkeley created the world’s first graphene nanopores that feature integrated optical antennas. The antennas open the door to high-speed optical nanopore sequencing of DNA. More>

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MSD Researchers Talk Materials Sciences With Local High School Students

Nick Borys, Alex Buyanin, and David Garfield shared with students at Los Lomas High School in Walnut Creek what it’s like to work “in the invisible realm” at the Molecular Foundry. They also shared tips on studying materials sciences in college. More>

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Outsmarting Thermodynamics in Self-Assembly of Nanostructures

Xiang Zhang, director of the Materials Sciences Division, led a study in which for the first time symmetry breaking in a bulk metamaterial solution was achieved. Zhang and his group demonstrated a technique for inducing self-assembled optical metamaterials with tailored broken-symmetries and hence unique electromagnetic responses. More>

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Nanotubes that Insert Themselves into Cell Membranes

Lab researchers have helped show that short carbon nanotubes can make excellent artificial pores within cell membranes. Moreover, these nanotubes, which are far more rugged than their biological counterparts, can self-insert into a cell membrane or other lipid bilayers. More>

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Lord of the Microrings: A Breakthrough in Microring Laser Cavities

Materials Sciences Division Director Xiang Zhang led the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand even from a conventional multi-mode laser cavity. This could impact a optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data storage, and high-resolution spectroscopy. More>

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Ebola is Topic of Nano*High Talk on Nov. 1

High school-age children are invited to attend a talk on Ebola by Donald Francis, an infectious disease expert who formerly worked for the Centers for Disease Control. The event takes place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 1, in 1 Pimentel Hall on the UC Berkeley campus. More>

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Materials Trick Might Help Move Computers Beyond Silicon

Research led by materials scientist Lane Martin has found an easy way to improve the performance of ferroelectric materials for use in computer processors that would be capable of both computation and memory storage without continuous external power sources. More>

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