Today at Berkeley Lab

A Chain Reaction to Spare the Air

Last year, materials scientist Jeff Long devised a new material that captures and releases CO2 at a lower temperature and in greater volume than current technologies. He’s now working to synthesize the new material at a large scale, to render it into pellet form, and confirm its increased CO2 capture performance under realistic conditions. More>

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Three Lab Researchers Named to National Academy of Engineering

Robert Budnitz of the Earth and Environmental Sciences Area, Gerbrand Ceder of the Materials Sciences Division, and Kathy Yelick, Associate Lab Director of Computing Sciences, were elected to the National Academy of Engineering in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. More>

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A New Form of Matter Unveiled…Time Crystals

If crystals have an atomic structure that repeats in space, can they also have a structure that repeats in time? That is, a time crystal? In a recent study, Norman Yao (Materials Sciences) describes how to make and measure the properties of such a crystal, and even predicts what the various phases surrounding the time crystal should be, like the liquid and gas phases of ice. More>

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For This Metal, Electricity Flows, But Not the Heat

Lab scientists have discovered that electrons in vanadium dioxide can conduct electricity without conducting heat, an exotic property in an unconventional material. The characteristic could lead to applications in thermoelectrics and window coatings. More>

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Alivisatos Among Five Honored by National Academy of Sciences

Materials scientist and former Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, along with four other researchers, is being recognized for “extraordinary scientific achievements in physical science and engineering.” A nanotechnology pioneer, Alivisatos’ research has had important ramifications for the development of renewable energy, biomedical imaging, and light-emitting devices. More>

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Exposure Feature on Lab Clean Water Research

Heavy metals can contaminate drinking water sources, posing a threat to public health. Cases of drinking water contamination in Flint, Mich., and Newark, N.J., motivated research into the development of tiny, customized crystals that can detect and trap waterborne heavy metals like mercury and lead. This Exposure feature includes photos and 360° view of ALS beamline 11.3.1. More>

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Gerd Ceder Wins IBA Research Award

Materials scientist Gerd Ceder received the 2017 Research Award from the International Battery Association (IBA). This award recognizes “individuals who have made outstanding accomplishments in battery research.” Ceder will receive the award and deliver a plenary lecture in March at the 2017 meeting of the IBA in Nara, Japan. More>

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Graphene Technique Could Help ‘See’ Electrical Signaling in Heart, Nerve Cells

Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive camera system in visually mapping tiny electric fields. They hope to enlist the new method to image electrical signaling networks in our hearts and brains. More>

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Berkeley Innovators Named Fellows of National Academy of Inventors

The Lab’s Paul Alivisatos, Amy Herr, and Enrique Iglesia were among 175 inductees. Election is a “distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.” More>

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Matter of Degrees: How Hot It Gets Still Depends on Us

In this article about climate change that appeared in UC Berkeley’s alumni magazine “California,” the author interviews Lab researchers Inez Fung, who explores how CO2 circulates through the planet’s oceans and land-based ecologies, and Jeffrey Long, who creates MOFs, which could become a crucial tool for capturing CO2 emissions at the source. More>

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