Today at Berkeley Lab

Schlegel, Yang Receive E.O. Lawrence Awards at Recent Ceremony

The Department of Energy bestowed the award to nine mid-career researchers to honor their contributions towards the DOE’s science, energy, and national security missions. The awardees include David Schlegel (Physics) and Peidong Yang (Materials Sciences). Go here to view a slideshow that highlights the research of the honorees. More>

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A Most Singular Nano-Imaging Technique

A multi-institutional team of researchers led by Paul Alivisatos has developed a new imaging technique called “SINGLE” that provides the first atomic-scale 3D structures of individual nanoparticles in solution. This is an important step for improving the design of colloidal nanoparticles for catalysis and energy research applications. More>

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A New Way of Probing Electrolyte/Electrode Interfaces

Researchers have developed a new technique that enables sensitive and specific detection of molecules at the electrode/electrolyte interface. This new method uses diffraction from graphene gratings to overcome key difficulties associated with traditional optical spectroscopy that employs infrared probing of buried interfaces. More>

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Bats Do It, Dolphins Do It, Now Humans Can Too

Berkeley physicists, including Alex Zettl, have used graphene to build lightweight ultrasonic loudspeakers and microphones, enabling people to mimic bats or dolphins’ ability to use sound to communicate and gauge the distance and speed of objects around them. More>

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Eli Yablonovitch Wins Institute of Physics Newton Medal

The United Kingdom’s Institute of Physics has awarded its prestigious Isaac Newton Medal and Prize to Berkeley Lab materials scientist Eli Yablonovitch, a pioneer in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics. More>

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Opening a New Route to Photonics

MSD Director Xiang Zhang has developed a new technique for effectively controlling pulses of light in closely packed nanoscale waveguides, an essential requirement for ultrahigh density, ultracompact integrated photonic circuitry. Photonics is highly promising for high-performance optical communications and chip-scale quantum computing. More>

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Marvin Cohen Uses Quantum Mechanics, Computers to Conjure Future

Cohen’s computer programs deploy the exquisite equations of quantum theory to explain the form and function of known materials, and are used to forecast the performance of newly envisioned ones. “Quantum mechanics,” he says, “fed my family.” More>

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Moving Towards a Body-on-a-Chip

Scientists around the world — including materials scientist Anurag Mathur — are creating new drug-testing devices that put cells from human organs onto chips. The medical breakthroughs could greatly speed drug testing, reduce the use of laboratory animals, and allow for experiments that would be too risky for human volunteers. More>

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The Perils of Platinum

Because of its outstanding performance as a catalyst, platinum plays a major role in fuel cells. Inside a fuel cell, tiny platinum particles break apart hydrogen fuel to create electricity. Peidong Yang helped create hollow platinum and nickel nanoparticles, which split oxygen molecules into charged oxygen ions, a reaction that’s needed in fuel cells. More>

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A Bright Light for Ultrafast Snapshots of Materials

Robert Kaindl and He Wang have developed a bright, high-repetition-rate laser source that can generate XUV light for ultrafast materials dynamics and electronic structure studies, providing new insights into the physics of correlated materials by tracking their rapid, fundamental interactions across large swaths of energy and momentum space. More>

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