Today at Berkeley Lab

Possible Avenue to Better Electrolyte for Lithium Ion Batteries

Rich Saykally, David Prendergast, and Steve Harris, conducted the first X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of a model electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries. The results show a pathway forward to improving lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles and large-scale electrical energy storage. More>

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Switching to Spintronics

ALD for Energy Technologies Ramamoorthy Ramesh led a study in which the application of an electric field at room temperature reversed the magnetization direction in a multiferroic spintronic device. This points a new way towards spintronics and smaller, faster and cheaper methods of storing and processing data. More>

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Where Vision Meets Know-How: Xiang Zhang’s XLab

The Lab’s Materials Sciences Division director is featured in a UC Berkeley publication, in a story that highlights his work with more than 30 Ph.D. students, postdocs, and visiting scientists who comprise “XLab.” The X, says Zhang, stands for explore, experiment, and excellence. More>

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A Better Look at the Chemistry of Interfaces

Materials scientist Chuck Fadley and chemical scientist Hendrik Bluhm developed a new X-ray spectroscopy technique called SWAPPS. This new technique provides sub-nanometer resolution of every chemical element found at heterogeneous interfaces, such as those in batteries, fuel cells and other devices. More>

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Advanced Materials for Gamma Ray Detection Project Kicks-Off

Director Alivisatos, John Valentine (Lab National & Homeland Security Manager) and lead PI Edith Bourret were among those gathered to launch the program, funded with $10 million from the Department of Energy, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. More>

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Berkeley Lab’s General Purpose Lab New Home for Battery Research

The San Jose Mercury News recently took a look at Berkeley Lab’s new General Purpose Laboratory building, noting that it will be home to the Lab’s portion of the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research battery hub. Researchers Venkat Srinivasan and Brett Helms gave the reporter an overview of what to expect in the coming years. More>

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Lin-Wang Wang wins time at DOE Leadership Computing Facility

Materials Scientist Lin-Wang Wang was awarded 25 million hours of processing time by the DOE’s Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program. He will conduct ab initio simulations of carrier transports in organic and inorganic nanosystems at Oak Ridge Lab’s supercomputer facilities. More>

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Review of Bioinspired Structural Materials Goes Viral

Videos on the Internet going viral are a weekly occurrence but scientific review articles going viral in journals such as Nature are quite rare. Materials scientists Robert Ritchie and Tony Tomsia authored an article on the amazing structural and mechanical characteristics found in natural materials, which received thousands of views and downloads. More>

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Marvin Cohen Receives Materials Society’s Highest Honor

Cohen received the 2014 Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society for “explaining and predicting properties of materials and for successfully predicting new materials using microscopic quantum theory.” He is a senior scientist in the Materials Sciences Division UC Berkeley University Professor. More>

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Golden Approach to High-Speed DNA Reading

Alex Zettl of the Materials Sciences Division in collaboration with Luke Lee at UC Berkeley created the world’s first graphene nanopores that feature integrated optical antennas. The antennas open the door to high-speed optical nanopore sequencing of DNA. More>

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