Today at Berkeley Lab

Berkeley Lab Quantum Science EFRC Receives DOE Funding

A new Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) led by Berkeley Lab is among 42 EFRC projects to collectively receive $100 million in funding from the DOE. The Center for Novel Pathways to Quantum Coherence in Materials will build on unique Lab capabilities and expertise in quantum materials and quantum coherence to develop new approaches to quantum information science and technology. More>

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Eugene Haller, Leading Expert in Semiconductor Materials, Dies at 75

Eugene Haller — the founder of the Electronic Materials Program at Berkeley Lab — passed away on June 22 at the age of 75. He was a highly regarded leader in the field of semiconductor materials. Haller’s career spanned more than 30 years, and during that time, he emerged as one of the scientific pioneers redefining the field of materials science and engineering to include semiconductors. More>

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Non-Crystal Clarity: Scientists Find Ordered Magnetic Patterns in Disordered Magnetic Material

A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab has confirmed a special property known as “chirality” — which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way — in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure. More>

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There’s a New Microscope in Town: ThemIS, Anyone?

Researchers at Berkeley Lab now have access to a unique new microscope that combines atomic-scale imaging capabilities with the ability to observe real-world sample properties and behavior in real time.

Housed at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry in partnership with the Materials Sciences Division, the new instrument is a high-stability, high-resolution Thermo Fischer “ThemIS” transmission electron microscope (TEM). More>

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Diamond ‘Spin-Off’ Could Lower Medical Imaging, Drug Discovery Costs

An international team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley discovered how to exploit defects in nanoscale and microscale diamonds, and potentially enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance systems while eliminating the need for their costly and bulky superconducting magnets. More>

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Lab’s Alivisatos, Alvarez to Address Symposium Honoring Steven Chu

Former Lab Director Paul Alivisatos and Laboratory Chief Information Officer Rosio Alvarez are among those scheduled to speak at a symposium celebrating Steven Chu’s 70th birthday. A Nobel Prize winner, Chu formerly served as Berkeley Lab director and U.S. Secretary of Energy. The event takes place Saturday, May 19, at Stanford University. More>

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Imaging the Effects of Substrate Strain on Magnetic Microstructures

One way to control magnetization in ultralow-power devices is to grow a ferromagnetic thin film on a piezoelectric substrate. How does the electrically induced strain in the substrate influence the thin-film magnetization? At the Advanced Light Source, researchers were able to image the magnetic behavior at the microscale and correlate it with the piezo-strain driving it. More>

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In Pursuit of Perfect Chemistry: A Vision for Unifying Catalysis

Several fields of research have sprung up around the chemical drivers, called catalysts, at work in many industrial processes — including those that boost the production of fuels, fertilizers, and foods — and there is a growing interest in coordinating these research activities to create new, hybrid catalysts with enhanced performance. More>

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Lab’s Miquel Salmeron Explains Why Ice Is Slippery on Podcast

Miquel Salmeron, with the Lab’s Materials Sciences Division, provides some answers to this centuries-old scientific debate on a recent episode of the “Every Little Thing” podcast. The program is a factual answering service, specializing in small questions. Another expert’s answer to the question “How are underwater tunnels built?” is included in the same episode as Salmeron’s answer. More>

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Valleytronics Discovery Could Pack More Power Into Future Microchips

Research recently published in Nature Communications finds useful new information-handling potential in samples of tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a candidate “valleytronics” transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips. More>

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