Today at Berkeley Lab

Lanzara Profiled in Moore Foundation’s ‘Beyond the Lab’

Materials scientist Alessandra Lanzara is a Moore Foundation grantee working on a cutting-edge technique called angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, or ARPES. This experimental tool gives scientists a glimpse into the secret lives of electrons and atoms, and could one day allow us to alter their properties using just a flash of light. More>

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Alivisatos Receives National Medal From President Obama

Former Lab Director and materials scientist Paul Alivisatos attended a special White House ceremony on May 19 to receive the National Medal, the nation’s highest honor for lifetime achievement in science. More>

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Alivisatos to Receive National Medal at White House Ceremony

Former Lab Director Paul Alivisatos will be among the 17 National Medal recipients who will receive their award from President Obama on May 19 at 11:30 a.m. (2:30 p.m. EST). The event will be live streamed here.

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Xiang Zhang Shares Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics

Zhang was recognized for his pioneering work on optical metamaterials and nanophotonics. His work has a major impact in optical physics and technology such as optical imaging, lithography, and photovoltaics. More>

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Surprising New Properties in a 2-D Semiconductor Discovered

A new class of semiconductor was discovered that is only three atoms thick and which extends in a two-dimensional plane, similar to graphene. These 2-D semiconductors, have exceptional optical characteristics, and could lead to improved semiconductors or new functionalities. More>

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A Leap Toward a ‘Perfect’ Quantum Metamaterial

Scientists have devised a way to build a “quantum metamaterial” – an engineered material with exotic properties not found in nature – using ultracold atoms trapped in an artificial crystal composed of light. The theoretical work represents a step toward manipulating atoms to transmit information, perform complex simulations or function as powerful sensors. More>

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Atomic Force Microscope Reveals Chemical Ghosts

To the surprise of chemists, a new technique for taking snapshots of molecules with atomic precision is turning up chemicals they shouldn’t be able to see. Researchers took snapshots of two molecules reacting on the surface of a catalyst, and found intermediate structures lasting for the 20 minutes or so it takes to snap a photo. More>

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Can Artificial Intelligence Create the Next Wonder Material?

Instead of continuing to develop new materials the old-fashioned way — stumbling across them by luck, then painstakingly measuring their properties in the laboratory — researchers, including the Lab’s Gerbrand Ceder and Kristin Persson, are using computer modelling and machine-learning techniques to generate libraries of candidate materials by the tens of thousands. More>

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Glaeser, Niyogi, Marqusee, and Yang Named to National Academy of Sciences

The election recognizes their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. NAS membership is one of the highest honors given to a scientist or engineer in the United States. Lab researchers include Robert Glaeser, Krishna Niyogi, and Susan Marqusee of of the Biosciences Area, and materials scientist Peidong Yang. More>

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Scientists Push Valleytronics One Step Closer to Reality

Scientists led by Xiang Zhang have taken a big step toward the practical application of
“valleytronics,” a new type of electronics that could lead to faster and more efficient computer
logic systems and data storage chips in next-generation devices. Researchers demonstrated the ability to electrically generate and control valley electrons in a two-dimensional semiconductor. More>

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