Today at Berkeley Lab

Using Microbial Communities to Assess Environmental Contamination

A multi-institutional study sponsored by ENIGMA, a DOE “Scientific Focus Area Program” based at Berkeley Lab, has found that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants and serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors. More>

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Life Sciences Co-Hosts STEM Career Awareness Day

Several Life Sciences Division laboratories opened their doors to high school students at the 2015 STEM Career Awareness Day on April 28. Three hundred East Bay students took part in this yearly event at which they were introduced to careers in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. More>

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Seeing Through Alzheimer’s Disease

In battling Alzheimer’s, researchers — including Berkeley Lab’s William Jagust — have been limited to a single snapshot of the brain provided by an autopsy. The course and chronology of the damage are still up for grabs. But the ability to peer into the brains of people struggling with Alzheimer’s as well as seniors free of its grip is increasing. More>

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Keasling Announces Biosciences’ Reorganization

Citing the changing nature of the Department of Energy’s biology mission, concerns about non-DOE funding, and the benefits of a refreshed divisional structure, Jay Keasling, Associate Laboratory Director for Biosciences, has announced an extensive reorganization of the Biosciences Area, effective October 1. More>

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Head-Gordon, Neumark, Nogales Elected to National Academy of Sciences

The academy is the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science organization. This year’s fellows include Martin Head-Gordon (left) and Daniel Neumark (center) of the Chemical Sciences Division, and Eva Nogales of the Life Sciences Division. More>

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Possible New RNA Engineering Tool

Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales of the Life Sciences and Physical Biosciences Divisions led a study that showed how complexes of bacterial proteins known as “CRISPR-Cas,” which are touted for their potential use as a DNA editing tool, might also serve as an engineering tool for RNA. More>

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In Memoriam: Former Life Sciences Researcher Alex Nichols (1924-2015)

Nichols worked at the Lab from 1950 to 1996, and continued on as an affiliate until 2007, making seminal contributions to lipoprotein research. He led a series of studies identifying dietary effects on lipoproteins that underlie the recommendations for reducing heart disease risk still in place today. More>

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Throwback Thursday…Life Scientist Mina Bissell Circa 1972

Famed breast cancer researcher Mina Bissell at the new Tissue Culture Facility in 1972.

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New Clues About the Risk of Cancer From Low-dose Radiation

Berkeley Lab scientists studied mice and found their risk of mammary cancer from low-dose radiation depends a great deal on their genetic makeup. They also learned key details about how genes and the tumor microenvironment affect cancer risk. Jian-Hua Mao led the research in close collaboration with fellow Life Science Division researchers Gary Karpen, Eleanor Blakely, Mina Bissell, and Antoine Snijders. More >

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Judith Campisi Wins Olav Thon Foundation Prize

It is the organization’s first international research award in the medical and natural sciences. Campisi was recognized for her pioneering work on the connection between aging, cancer, and the process of cellular senescence, which is linked to chronic inflammation. She shares the prize with Yosef Shiloh. More>

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