Today at Berkeley Lab

Possible New RNA Engineering Tool

Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales of the Life Sciences and Physical Biosciences Divisions led a study that showed how complexes of bacterial proteins known as “CRISPR-Cas,” which are touted for their potential use as a DNA editing tool, might also serve as an engineering tool for RNA. More>

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In Memoriam: Former Life Sciences Researcher Alex Nichols (1924-2015)

Nichols worked at the Lab from 1950 to 1996, and continued on as an affiliate until 2007, making seminal contributions to lipoprotein research. He led a series of studies identifying dietary effects on lipoproteins that underlie the recommendations for reducing heart disease risk still in place today. More>

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Throwback Thursday…Life Scientist Mina Bissell Circa 1972

Famed breast cancer researcher Mina Bissell at the new Tissue Culture Facility in 1972.

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New Clues About the Risk of Cancer From Low-dose Radiation

Berkeley Lab scientists studied mice and found their risk of mammary cancer from low-dose radiation depends a great deal on their genetic makeup. They also learned key details about how genes and the tumor microenvironment affect cancer risk. Jian-Hua Mao led the research in close collaboration with fellow Life Science Division researchers Gary Karpen, Eleanor Blakely, Mina Bissell, and Antoine Snijders. More >

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Judith Campisi Wins Olav Thon Foundation Prize

It is the organization’s first international research award in the medical and natural sciences. Campisi was recognized for her pioneering work on the connection between aging, cancer, and the process of cellular senescence, which is linked to chronic inflammation. She shares the prize with Yosef Shiloh. More>

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Microbes to Biomes (M2B) Town Hall on Feb. 20

The event — which will explore the M2B initiative and FY16 LDRD opportunities — runs from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. Eoin Brodie, Peter Nico, Javier Ceja Navarro, Tanja Woyke, Matt Blow, Susan Celniker, and Ben Brown will provide short presentations and participate in a panel-based discussion. Go here for more on M2B.

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Life Sciences Division’s Eva Nogales Wins Protein Society Award

The Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Award recognizes exceptional contributions in protein science that profoundly influence our understanding of biology. Nogales has played a central role in the development and implementation of electron crystallography and single particle electron microscopy reconstruction. More>

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Testing for Mortality: Should You Have Your Telomeres Measured?

A Menlo Park company can measure the length of a protective cap, called a telomere, at the end of each strand of DNA. The biggest flaw with telomere testing is that the general trends we’ve learned from large research studies — “long is good, short is bad” — can’t be accurately applied to a single person, says Berkely Lab’s Judith Campisi. More>

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Mina Bissell Gives ‘Women We Admire’ Lecture at UCOP

The talk takes place Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon in Lobby One of the UC Office of the President, located at 1111 Franklin St., Oakland. Phone access is also available. The event is sponsored by the President’s Advisory Committee on the Status of Women. More>

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Mice Travel to Space for Study on Organ Development

The rodents will join the crew of the International Space Station to help scientists learn how space travel affects the immune system, organ development, and reproduction across generations. The mice are part of a NASA-funded Lab study that includes Janice Pluth, Antoine Snijders, Deepa Sridharan, and Jian-Hua Mao. More>

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