Today at Berkeley Lab

Joint Genome Institute Discovers Novel Giant Viruses

As reported in the April 7 issue of Science, a JGI-led team discovered a group of giant viruses dubbed Klosneuviruses in sequence data from wastewater treatment samples. The team says the finding significantly increases our understanding of viral evolution. Postdoc and study first author Frederik Schulz was interviewed on Science Friday about the work. More>

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JGI Contributes to Study on Speciation in Nature

Joint Genome Institute and Duke University researchers utilized a relative of the model plant Arabidopsis to provide the first direct evidence that QTLs, genome regions on chromosomes to which genetic traits can be mapped, are a driving force behind speciation. This research appeared in in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. More>

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JGI Helps Identify Grass Gene Controlling Water Loss

With help from the Joint Genome Institute, a Stanford University team used a genetic screen to identify a mutant in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon that affects stomatal morphology and, by extension, how plants manage water. More>

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JGI Looks at Nitrogen Uptake Between Fungi and Orchids

Researchers at the Joint Genome Institute and University of Turin investigated for the first time the fungal genes that may have been involved in both the uptake and transfer of nitrogen to the host plant. RNA sequencing was performed at JGI as part of the 2013 Community Science Program. More>

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JGI 2016 Progress Report Now Available

Highlighting the achievements of the previous year, the Joint Genome Institute’s 2016 Progress Report is now available for download. Print copies may be requested from Terri Bartolome.

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The ‘Dark Matter’ of the Microbial World

A study of gut microbiomes finds that a common DNA sequencing technique overlooks 90 percent of the diversity in archaea, which are single-celled microbes more closely related to humans than bacteria. Archaea are difficult to study, so not much is known about the organisms. This can lead to bias in the archaea knowledge base, says JGI’s Tanja Woyke. More>

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Jill Banfield to Keynote JGI’s April NeLLi Workshop

Joint Genome Institute collaborator Jill Banfield (EESA) will deliver the keynote talk at the “NeLLi: From New Lineages of Life to New Functions” Workshop, April 5-6 in Walnut Creek. The workshop aims to foster discussions on how to capture, define, quantify, and functionally characterize microbial and viral diversity. Go here for full agenda, speaker lineup, and registration information.

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Revealing Aspergillus Diversity for Industrial Applications

In the world of fungi, Aspergillus is an industrial superstar, playing a critical role in biofuel production, and plant and human health, among other applications. But the majority of its 350 species has yet to be sequenced. A team including JGI researchers sequenced the genomes of 10 novel Aspergillus species, more than doubling the number of Aspergillus species sequenced to date. More>

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JGI’s Community Science Program is Accepting Letters of Intent

The JGI Community Science Program (CSP) is currently accepting Letters of Intent. The deadline for submission is March 31. The CSP Annual Call is focused on large-scale, sequence-based, genomic science projects that address questions of relevance to DOE missions in energy security and sustainability and global biogeochemistry. More>

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Proposals for JGI-NERSC Microbiome Data Science Call Due March 1

The call will enable users to perform state-of-the-art computational genomics and metagenomics research and help them translate sequence information generated by the JGI or elsewhere into biological discovery. The call aims to help users perform large-scale computational analyses of sequence data to solve DOE mission-relevant problems. More>

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