Today at Berkeley Lab

JGI Collaborative Science Program Yields Fungal Study

A comparative analysis of four fungal secretomes to learn more about the pathways they deploy to break down carbon compounds was made possible by a program called FICUS between two national user facilities: the JGI at Berkeley Lab, and the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Lab. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Developing Novel Techniques to Visualize Uncultured Microbial Cell Activity

Caltech and JGI researchers utilized a recently refined technique to identify both individual active cells, and single clusters of active bacteria and archaea within microbial communities. Insights from the true scope of the planet’s microbial diversity could have energy and environment applications. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Insights into How Soil Microbes Regulate Carbon and Sulfur Cycling

Utilizing microcosms of peat soil, researchers at the Joint Genome Institute mimicked naturally fluctuating conditions to study sulfate-reducing microbes and how they regulate methane production in peat microbial communities. Understanding these rare microbes offers insights into both the characterization of microbial ecological functioning and to mitigate global climate change. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

JGI Team Leads Project on Evolution of Fungal Sensory Perception

Fungi can sense environmental signals and react accordingly, changing their development, direction of growth, and metabolism. New results published in Current Biology by a JGI-led team based on characterizing and then conducting a comparative analysis of two genome sequences shed light on the evolution of sensory perception in fungi. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

JGI Researchers Call for Formation of a National Microbiome Data Center

JGI researchers have called for the formation of a National Microbiome Data Center to efficiently manage the datasets accumulated globally. The timely publication complements the White House’s launch of a National Microbiome Initiative focused on comparing microbial communities across ecosystems to identify the “organizing principles” that shape all microbiomes. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

JGI Team Refines Evolutionary Timeline of White Rot Fungi

Biofuels researchers are interested in wood-decaying fungi because their enzymes allow them to degrade plant mass. Scientists with the Joint Genome Institute, INRA (France) and Clark University conducted a comparative genomics analysis in order to better reconstruct the origins of lignin-degrading fungal enzymes. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

JGI Helps Apply Genomics for Improving Cassava Breeding Strategies

Cassava is a staple crop for nearly a billion people around the world. Reported online in Nature Biotechnology, a team including JGI researchers has described cassava’s genetic diversity. With the help of genomics, researchers hope to apply advanced breeding strategies that can improve cassava’s resistance to diseases and improve crop yields. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Proving the Genetic Code’s Flexibility

Researchers from the Joint Genome Institute and Yale University have discovered that microorganisms recognize more than one codon for selenocysteine. The finding adds credence to recent studies indicating that an organism’s genetic vocabulary is not as constrained as had been long held. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

JGI Annual Report Now Available

Highlighting the previous year’s achievements, the Joint Genome Institute’s 2015 Progress Report is now available for download. Print copies may be requested from Terri Bartolome.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Campus Hosts ‘Genomics Program Biotechnology Companies Day’ on March 18

The Genomics Program Biotechnology Companies Day will include visitors from a number of local companies who will describe problems/findings of interest, and interact with the guests of the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing. Registration is required to attend this event. There is no registration fee. The Lab’s Hayan Lee is one of the organizers. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.