Today at Berkeley Lab

DOE JGI/EMSL Collaborative Science Initiative Projects Announced

The DOE Joint Genome Institute and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) have accepted 12 projects submitted during the 2014 … More»

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Dyeing to Learn More About Marine Viruses

The sheer volume of oceanic cyanobacteria makes them major players in the global carbon cycle and responsible for up to a third of the carbon fixed. However, very little is known about the viruses in the water. To help resolve this lack of knowledge, a population-scale survey was conducted at JGI using a game-changing new technique. More>

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JGI Celebrates Safety and Wellness at 8th Annual Fair

Gathering in Walnut Creek sought to expand safety culture, promote healthy living, and raise awareness of services offered at the Joint Genome Institute, Berkeley Lab, and Contra Costa County. More>

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Eucalyptus, a Global Tree for Fuel and Fiber, Sequenced by JGI

Information will help harness tree’s potential as energy feedstock that doesn’t compete with food crops. More>

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JGI Helps Trace Citrus Cultivation History Through Genomics

Research seeks to defend the fruit against citrus greening and other threats. More>

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JGI Helps Unlock Genetic Makeup of Common Bean

Research important for improving agricultural practices and increasing crop yields for food and biofuel. More>

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Latest Issue of JGI Primer Now Available

The Spring 2014 issue of the JGI Primer is now available from the Joint Genome Institute, with highlights from the recent Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting and other stories. For hard copies or to be added to the distribution list, contact Terri Bartolome.

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Salt Needed: Tolerance Lessons from a Dead Sea Fungus

Despite its name, the Dead Sea does support life. Algae, bacteria, and fungi make up the limited number of species that can tolerate the extremely salty environment. Some organisms thrive in salty environments by lying dormant when salt concentrations are very high. Other organisms need salt to grow. To learn which survival strategy the filamentous fungus Eurotium rubrum uses, a team of researchers — including the Joint Genome Institute’s Igor Grigoriev — studied its genome. More>

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Discovering Diversity, One Cell at a Time

cyanobacteria jgiThe game where one has to guess how many jellybeans or marbles can fill a jar should never be played with the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus. By some estimates, in a single liter of water as many as 100 million cells of this tiny bacterium can be found. As reported in the April 25, 2014 issue of Science, JGI collaborator Sallie Chisholm, her post-doctoral fellow Nadav Kashtan, and their collaborators at the DOE JGI sequenced and assembled Prochlorococcus genomes from single cells collected at the Bermuda-Atlantic Time-series Study site in the northwestern Sargasso Sea between November 2008 and April 2009.

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Lab Participates in NASA Earth Day Global Selfie

Employees from NERSC, ESNet, the Joint Genome Institute, Earth Sciences, the Molecular Foundry (pictured), and the Advanced Light Source gathered to take selfies as part of NASA’s worldwide celebration of Earth Day yesterday. NASA astronauts brought home the first ever images of the whole planet from space. Now NASA satellites capture new images of Earth every second. For Earth Day they tried to create an image of Earth from the ground up while also fostering a collection of portraits of the people of Earth. Check out our full #GlobalSelfie recap on Storify.

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