Today at Berkeley Lab

JGI Helps Apply Genomics for Improving Cassava Breeding Strategies

Cassava is a staple crop for nearly a billion people around the world. Reported online in Nature Biotechnology, a team including JGI researchers has described cassava’s genetic diversity. With the help of genomics, researchers hope to apply advanced breeding strategies that can improve cassava’s resistance to diseases and improve crop yields. More>

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Proving the Genetic Code’s Flexibility

Researchers from the Joint Genome Institute and Yale University have discovered that microorganisms recognize more than one codon for selenocysteine. The finding adds credence to recent studies indicating that an organism’s genetic vocabulary is not as constrained as had been long held. More>

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JGI Annual Report Now Available

Highlighting the previous year’s achievements, the Joint Genome Institute’s 2015 Progress Report is now available for download. Print copies may be requested from Terri Bartolome.

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Campus Hosts ‘Genomics Program Biotechnology Companies Day’ on March 18

The Genomics Program Biotechnology Companies Day will include visitors from a number of local companies who will describe problems/findings of interest, and interact with the guests of the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing. Registration is required to attend this event. There is no registration fee. The Lab’s Hayan Lee is one of the organizers. More>

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JGI Director to Step Down, Assume Scientific Helm of Startup

After 14 years guiding the Joint Genome Institute from completing DOE’s contributions to the Human Genome Project to transitioning the Institute into a National User Facility enabling the science of thousands of researchers focused on energy and environmental problems, JGI Director Eddy Rubin announced that he is stepping down later this year. More>

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JGI User Facility Partnership Yields Science Study on Gut Fungi

Reported online Feb. 18 in Science, UC Santa Barbara researchers studying gut fungi in livestock
for biofuel production used resources at the JGI and the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory. This is the first study to result from a partnership between the two national user facilities called Facilities Integrating Collaborations for User Science (FICUS). More>

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JGI Seagrass Genome Project Makes Nature Cover

The February 18 cover of the journal Nature was of a seagrass meadow, and related to a project done through the JGI’s Community Science Program. With collaborators, the JGI sequenced and analyzed the first seagrass genome; with other seagrasses, its coastal habitats are among the world’s most threatened ecosystems. More>

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JGI Video Highlights Interactions Between Lab’s User Facilities

JGI has a new animation that seeks to answer the age-old question, “What is a user facility?” by demonstrating how JGI, NERSC and ESnet work together, underpinning JGI’s critical research infrastructure to advance the frontiers of science.

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Applications for JGI Secondary Metabolites Meeting Due Feb. 29

Applications are being accepted for the Microbial and Plant Systems Modulated by Secondary Metabolites Meeting in May. The aim of this meeting is to bring together a diverse group of investigators interested in the role of secondary metabolites in plant-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. See the list of confirmed speakers here.

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JGI Team Reports Sequencing Technology Biases Could Hide Microbial Lineages

In an article complementing work that led to uncovering the novel candidate bacterial phylum Kryptonia and with help from NERSC, JGI researchers wondered how many other microbial lineages might have been missed, as Kryptonia had been from available sequences in existing datasets. The report appeared in nature Microbiology. More>

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