Today at Berkeley Lab

Ghostly Voices From Thomas Edison’s Dolls Can Now be Heard

Thanks to technology developed by the particle physicist Carl Haber and the engineer Earl Cornell at Berkeley Lab, the voices of rare talking dolls created by Thomas Edison in the late 1800’s can now be heard. More>

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PBD’s Jennifer Doudna Profiled in the New York Times

As a child in Hilo, Doudna felt out of place. She had blond hair and blue eyes, and she was taller than the other kids, who were mostly of Polynesian and Asian descent. Her isolation contributed to a kind of bookishness that propelled her toward science. More>

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Using a Smartphone to Detect Parasites in Blood

A team led by physical bioscientist Daniel Fletcher has developed a new smartphone microscope called CellScope Loa, which uses video to detect and analyze parasitic worm infections in blood. The tool could help fight diseases in remote parts of the world. More>

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Learning from Earth’s Smallest Ecosystems

From inside our bodies to under the ocean floor, microbiomes thrive everywhere in nature. Yet we know surprisingly little about the inner workings of nature’s smallest and most complex ecosystems. The Kavli Foundation recently hosted a Google hangout on the topic, which include earth scientist Eoin Brodie. More>

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Doudna Among ‘Most Influential Women’ in Bay Area Business

Physical bioscientist Jennifer Doudna has been named one of the most influential women in Bay Area business by the San Francisco Business Times. Asked how to help women in business, she says: “Follow your passion and never ever give up.” More>

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CRD’s Wehner Featured in National Geographic Story on Extreme Weather

The computational climatologist said extreme weather changes will likely become noticeable with rise of two degrees Celsius in the average global surface temperature, which can trigger large changes to the number of Category 4 and 5 storms, and how strong they are. More>

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Recycling Nuclear Fuel With Californium

Californium, a radioactive element discovered at Berkeley Lab in 1950, has most often been used in metal detectors, but a researcher at Florida State University has discovered new properties of the heavy metal that could someday help the U.S. store and recycle its spent nuclear fuel. More>

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Lab’s Perlmutter Featured in April 22 Hubble Telescope Documentary

Twenty-five years ago, NASA launched one of the most ambitious experiments in the history of astronomy: the Hubble Space Telescope. In honor of Hubble’s landmark anniversary, NOVA tells the remarkable story of the telescope that forever changed our understanding of the cosmos. The program airs at 9 p.m. on KQED. More>

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Lab’s Doudna Makes Time Magazine’s ‘100 Most Influential’ List

Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier were recognized for their development of CRISPR-Cas9 technology, which gives scientists the power to remove or add genetic material at will. Geneticists have used this technology to cut out HIV, to correct sickle-cell anemia, and to alter cancer cells to make them more susceptible to chemotherapy. More>

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Can Plant Genetics Help Solve World Hunger? Science Says Yes

When it comes to the earth’s dwindling resources, climbing temperatures and burgeoning population, talk is as plentiful as it is cheap. It can also be contentious. But JBEI’s Pamela Ronald doesn’t have time for controversy. She’s focused feeding the growing population without further destroying the environment. More>

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