Today at Berkeley Lab

The Bloody Battle Against Aging

By examining the chemical makeup of young blood, bioengineers, including David Schaffer of the Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division, have discovered a drug that could turn back the age clock. More>

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Climate Change to Blame for Deaths in 2003 Heat Wave, New Study Says

Scientists merged climate data and health data to determine the likelihood that a warming climate influenced the death toll, which totaled 1,050 in Paris and London. The study “takes us a little farther, looking at apparent temperature, a function of temperature and humidity, and relates it to how many people died,” says the Lab’s Michael Wehner. More>

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‘Water Windfall’ Found Deep Beneath California’s Central Valley

Scientists say it’s three times more groundwater than previous estimates and four times more if saltier water is included. This could come as welcome news with the state’s drought. However, the Lab’s Preston Jordan says much of the water is too salty and not usable unless treated. More>

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Is U.S. at Risk of Losing Supercomputing Leadership?

“All the U.S. systems on the list are getting old,” said the Lab’s Horst Simon, regarding the recent top 500 rankings of fastest supercomputers. “There will be no 100-petaflop systems in the U.S. for two years…and we have been complacent for four or five years about pushing for an exaflop system.” His comments appear in a “nextBIG Future” story. More>

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Research Finds Low Levels of Indoor CO2 Impair Thinking

Bill Fisk (ETA) developed a test to measure decision-making and had participants take three versions of the test, each time with different CO2 levels in the room. The results floored Fisk. At concentrations as low as 1,000 parts per million, decision-making declined. More>

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China Wins New Bragging Rights in Supercomputers

China dominates a biannual ranking of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers, called the Top500. Not only does China have the world’s fastest machine for the seventh consecutive time, it has the largest number of computers among the top 500 — a first for any country other than the United States. The list is compiled by the Lab’s Horst Simon and Erich Strohmaier. More>

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FAQ on How Public Affairs Can Help Share Your News With the Media

Have a pending publication you’d like publicized? An interesting story to tell? Need help talking with reporters? In a new FAQ, “Working with Public Affairs,” get answers to some of the most common questions researchers ask on how to promote new research and learn how Public Affairs can help reach new audiences. To visit the page, go here (LDAP login required).

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Scientists Grapple Over Extent Humans Are Making Extreme Weather Worse

Attribution science seeks to help people in positions of power make decisions about adapting to a changing world. Scientists study a class of events, and assess whether past human actions have increased their risk. However, sometimes, humans don’t play a role, says the Lab’s Dáithí Stone. More>

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World On Pace to Install 700 Million More Air Conditioners by 2030

Nihar Shah of the Energy Technologies Area was a guest on a recent episode of NPR’s “Here and Now” program, discussing how to make air conditioning more energy efficient and environmentally friendly. More>

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Kasen Pens Scientific American Article on Understanding Exploding Stars

“Roughly every second, somewhere in our observable universe, another sun is destroyed in a stellar catastrophe — when a star pulsates, collides, collapses to a black hole or explodes as a supernova. This dynamic side of the universe has lately come to the forefront of astronomical research,” says Daniel Kasen of the Lab’s Nuclear Science Division. More>

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