Today at Berkeley Lab

Lab’s Doudna Makes Time Magazine’s ‘100 Most Influential’ List

Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier were recognized for their development of CRISPR-Cas9 technology, which gives scientists the power to remove or add genetic material at will. Geneticists have used this technology to cut out HIV, to correct sickle-cell anemia, and to alter cancer cells to make them more susceptible to chemotherapy. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Can Plant Genetics Help Solve World Hunger? Science Says Yes

When it comes to the earth’s dwindling resources, climbing temperatures and burgeoning population, talk is as plentiful as it is cheap. It can also be contentious. But JBEI’s Pamela Ronald doesn’t have time for controversy. She’s focused feeding the growing population without further destroying the environment. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Scientists Study Beetle Flight with Tiny Computers

PBD Faculty Engineer Michel Maharbiz and his former graduate student Hitoko Sato have been strapping computers and radios on the backs of beetles to discover how they fly. Watching them twist and turn and hover in the air will inform the design and development of tiny flying robots. The research was covered in SFGate. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

ETA’s Vi Rapp Discusses Reducing Carbon Monoxide Risks in Q&A

Carbon monoxide is the biggest indoor air quality health concern because it can result in death very rapidly and silently, says Vi. But her research group is also looking at nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and mold. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

City of Berkeley Ranks # 1 in ‘Most Worker Diversity’

As reported by MarketWatch, a WalletHub survey found Berkeley to have the nation’s most “worker diversity.” The diversity reflects the city’s rare mix of government workers (largely through UC Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley Lab), private-sector workers, and self-employed, and it’s a factor expected to keep the economy of the area sound. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Waves of the Future May Bend Around Metamaterials

A New York Times article about new materials that bend light waves in ways that could not occur naturally mentions the Lab’s Xiang Zhang. He has pioneered a number of applications for metamaterials and says he hears from many military contractors and commercial companies that are interested in pursuing metamaterial applications. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Large Hadron Collider Ramps Up to Shed Light on Dark Matter

Last week word was announced that the Large Hadron Collider will soon be online again, after taking two years off for an upgrade. Many lab researchers have been involved with various research efforts at the LHC. The Guardian has more on the restart.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

How to Detect a Rare Particle Decay with a Detector Made of (Almost) Nothing

Researchers are one step closer to finding new physics with the completion of a harp-shaped prototype particle detector element for the Mu2e experiment. The Mu2e Collaboration is comprised of over one hundred physicists from all over the world, including Berkeley Lab. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Lab’s China Energy Group Featured in New Asia Society Report

The report, “A Vital Partnership: California and China Collaborating on Clean Energy and Combating Climate Change,” features the China Energy Group’s work as a successful example of collaboration with Chinese state agencies. The report was launched at an event featuring Jerry Brown, Steve Chu, and China Energy Group head Lynn Price. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Climate Change Will Hit America in the Breadbasket, Scientists Say

NBC News recently quoted Michael Wehner of the Computational Research Division in a story about the future of U.S. food production in the face of climate change. Wehner warns of a looming crisis due to shifts in weather patterns. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.