Today at Berkeley Lab

Ed Lofgren, Pioneering ‘Rad Lab’ Physicist, Dies at 102

Lofgren, who died on Sept. 6, played key roles in many projects throughout the Lab’s history. He was a close associate of E.O. Lawrence, and chief physicist for the development, construction, and operation of the Bevatron. He also served as associate laboratory director, and was the first director of the Accelerator Division. He retired in 1979. More>

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In Memoriam: Legendary Lab Physicist Ed Lofgren (1914-2016)

Edward Lofgren (2nd from right), a physicist hired by E.O Lawrence who worked on an early isotope-separating cyclotron, participated in the Manhattan Project, and oversaw the operation of the Bevatron accelerator as its first director when the antiproton was discovered there, died Sept. 5, at the age of 102. A full obit, including memorial service details, will appear in TABL in the coming days.

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How ESnet, the World’s Fastest Science Network, Was Built

This BuzzFeed-inspired listicle looks at how DOE’s ESnet (Energy Sciences Network) was built over 30 years and in 13 steps. ESnet connects more than 40 DOE research sites — including the entire National Lab system, supercomputing facilities and major scientific instruments — as well as hundreds of other science networks around the world and the Internet.

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Darkness Falls on the Dinosaurs

In 1980, Luis Alvarez and colleagues at Berkeley Lab, proposed what has become the preeminent theory of the dinosaurs’ annihilation: an asteroid six miles wide struck Earth at the same geologic instant that the dinosaurs and many other organisms went extinct. Yet among geoscientists, there has been a lingering sense that the story has not been told in full. More>

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Foundry Symposium Highlights 10 Years of Achievement

The event included talks by Foundry Director Jeff Neaton, past and present lab directors, users, and Congressman Mike Honda (pictured). Topics included the use of the facility for research on nanophotonics, nanocrystal probes for biological and medical applications, and the use of computer simulations for materials design. More>

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Message From Director Witherell on Molecular Foundry Anniversary

This week we are celebrating the many scientific breakthroughs made possible by the Molecular Foundry in its ten years of operation. It is a good time for us as a Laboratory to consider why this new scientific user facility developed so quickly into a scientific powerhouse and what that means for us in thinking about future facilities. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Ten

In 2015, a team of staff and users at the Molecular Foundry developed a technique to measure the 3-D position of individual atoms in a given sample with a precision of 19 picometers, or 19 trillionths of a meter. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Nine

In 2014, Molecular Foundry scientists, in collaboration with the semiconductor industry and Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, pioneer a new approach to miniaturizing nanofabricated devices like transistors. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Six

In 2011, Molecular Foundry scientists created highly water-attracting or “wettable” patterns on water-repellant, porous polymer films that serve as tiny channels for mixing or separating fluids, with potential applications in biological and medical fields. The next highlight will appear in the next issue of TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Five

In 2010, Molecular Foundry researchers discovered the self-assembly of nanostructures known as peptoids, which are synthetic polymers that mimic small biological molecules called peptides and are useful in biomedical and other types of research. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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