Today at Berkeley Lab

Foundry Symposium Highlights 10 Years of Achievement

The event included talks by Foundry Director Jeff Neaton, past and present lab directors, users, and Congressman Mike Honda (pictured). Topics included the use of the facility for research on nanophotonics, nanocrystal probes for biological and medical applications, and the use of computer simulations for materials design. More>

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Message From Director Witherell on Molecular Foundry Anniversary

This week we are celebrating the many scientific breakthroughs made possible by the Molecular Foundry in its ten years of operation. It is a good time for us as a Laboratory to consider why this new scientific user facility developed so quickly into a scientific powerhouse and what that means for us in thinking about future facilities. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Ten

In 2015, a team of staff and users at the Molecular Foundry developed a technique to measure the 3-D position of individual atoms in a given sample with a precision of 19 picometers, or 19 trillionths of a meter. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Nine

In 2014, Molecular Foundry scientists, in collaboration with the semiconductor industry and Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source, pioneer a new approach to miniaturizing nanofabricated devices like transistors. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Six

In 2011, Molecular Foundry scientists created highly water-attracting or “wettable” patterns on water-repellant, porous polymer films that serve as tiny channels for mixing or separating fluids, with potential applications in biological and medical fields. The next highlight will appear in the next issue of TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Five

In 2010, Molecular Foundry researchers discovered the self-assembly of nanostructures known as peptoids, which are synthetic polymers that mimic small biological molecules called peptides and are useful in biomedical and other types of research. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Four

In 2009, a team of Molecular Foundry scientists developed upconverting nanoparticles, or UCNPs, that would lead to ultrasmall, ultrabright probes for biological imaging, potentially at the scale of individual molecules. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights Series: Part Three

In 2009, a world-leading aberration-corrected electron microscope, which led to groundbreaking Molecular Foundry research in atomic-resolution imaging, was developed at Berkeley Lab’s National Center for Electron Microscopy. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Molecular Foundry 10th Anniversary Science Highlights: Part Two

In 2008, a robot called WANDA (Workstation for Automated Nanomaterial Discovery and Analysis) was deployed to create nanocrystals on demand. WANDA produces a high volume of colloidal crystals with properties tailored for specific applications, such as electronics or biological research. The next highlight will appear in tomorrow’s TABL. More>

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Molecular Foundry Tenth Anniversary Science Highlight Series

Research led by Foundry scientists in 2006 demonstrated the importance of many-electron
effects on electronic properties of metal-organic interfaces
, which is critical for understanding
how electrons transfer through molecular junctions and provides new insight about nanoscale switches and solar cells. The next science highlight will appear in the March 14 edition of TABL. More>

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