Today at Berkeley Lab

Global Cool Cities Alliance Establishes Arthur Rosenfeld Award

The award was established to honor the legacy and impact of Rosenfeld’s advocacy for cooler buildings, cooler cities, and a cooler planet. Rosenfeld, who passed away in January, was a founder of the alliance. Also, the California Energy Commission recently created a video commemorating Rosenfeld’s life.

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Advancing Education for Tomorrow’s Building Technicians

The Energy Technologies Area hosted an annual institute to advance education for tomorrow’s building technicians. Faculty from community colleges attended “Learning by Doing in Building Technician Education: New Technologies, Teaching Strategies, and Lab Applications.” Using hands-on activities, the group learned about ensuring building comfort and functionality while saving energy. More>

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Tang Prize Foundation Dedicates Film to Art Rosenfeld

Rosenfeld, who passed away earlier this year, received the Tang Prize for Sustainable Development in 2016 for his many contributions to energy conservation. The Tang Prize Foundation made this documentary film, titled “The Godfather of Energy Efficiency” to honor Rosenfeld’s legacy. Watch>

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State Legislators Adjourn Senate, Assembly in Memory of Art Rosenfeld

During the adjournment last week, Senator Nancy Skinner and Assemblyman Tony Thurmond cited Rosenfeld’s pioneering work to establish the Lab as a leader in energy efficiency research, his service on the Energy Commission, and the “Rosenfeld Effect” that’s kept California’s per capita electricity consumption flat since the 1970s. Watch Skinner’s remarks here, and Thurmond’s here.

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Green Science Institute Hosts Conference on Flame Retardant Dilemma

What do Teflon frying pans, Goretex jackets, and pizza boxes have in common? They are among the consumer products that still contain toxic flame retardants. Learn more at the “Flame Retardant Dilemma and Beyond Symposium” on Feb. 10 at UC Berkeley. Among the event organizers is Don Lucas of the Energy Technologies Area. More>

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Lab Researchers Included in NOVA Feature on Search for Super Battery

The program explores the hidden world of energy storage and how it holds the keys to a greener future. Lab battery researcher Lynn Trahey was included, and the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, which the Lab co-leads with Argonne, was mentioned. Watch the full episode here.

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High-Res Imaging Reveals New Understanding of Battery Cathode Particles

Using advanced imaging techniques, Guoying Chen of the Energy Technologies Area may have solved a long-standing mystery around what exactly happens inside a cathode particle as lithium-ion batteries are charged and discharged, paving the way for improved batteries. The study was published in Nature Communications. More>

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Art Rosenfeld, Godfather of Energy Efficiency, Passes Away

Art Rosenfeld, a Berkeley Lab Distinguished Scientist Emeritus who was also known as California’s “godfather” of energy efficiency and has been credited with being personally responsible for billions of dollars in energy savings, died Friday at his home in Berkeley. He was 90. More>

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$5 Million Gift for Lab’s US-China Energy Center, Endowed Chair

The gift for the center, from Jim and Marilyn Simons, focuses on its scientific research and analysis on clean energy solutions for China, such as low-carbon cities, carbon markets, and clean energy system planning and integration. In addition to support for the center, $2 million will go towards creating the Nat Simons Chair in China Energy Policy, to be held by Jiang Lin. More>

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Regional Methane Emissions May Be Double What We Thought

Emissions of methane — a potent climate-warming gas — may be roughly twice as high as officially estimated for the Bay Area. Most of the emissions come from biological sources, such as landfills, but natural gas leakage is also an important source, according to a new study by ETA’s Marc Fischer and Seongeun Jeong. More>

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