Today at Berkeley Lab

EESA Releases Strategic Vision 2025

April is Earth Month and the Earth & Environmental Sciences Area has released its strategic plan, EESA Strategic Vision 2025. This plan describes the collective vision of EESA’s scientists for the next decade and outlines five “Grand Challenges” and goals for three “Cross-Cutting Technologies and Platforms.” This year marks EESA’s 40th anniversary at Berkeley Lab. To learn more, visit EESA Strategic Vision 2025.

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April 7 Earth Sciences Talk on Global Carbon Budget

The Earth and Environmental Sciences Area will host a Distinguished Scientist Seminar at 10:30 a.m. in the Building 66 Auditorium. Pierre Regnier of the Université Libre de Bruxelles will present “Global Carbon Budget and its Anthropogenic Perturbation in the Land-Ocean Continuum: From Catchments to the Globe.” More>

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Soil, Climate Research Makes Science Magazine Cover, Podcast

A recent Science magazine podcast interviewed EESA’s Caitlin Hicks Pries on a study she co-led with Margaret Torn on how soil might contribute to global warming (16:10 mark). Their study was also the cover of the most recent issue of the magazine.

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A Pioneering Study on Amazon Windthrows

Earth and Environmental Sciences Area researchers have published the first study on windthrow variability, focusing on central Amazonia. Windthrows destroy large swaths of trees, play a significant role in forest structures and dynamics, and affect carbon storage. More>

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EESA’s Michael Manga Receives Distinguished Teaching Award

Manga, with the Earth and Environmental Sciences Area, was among five UC Berkeley faculty who received the award, the campus’ most prestigious honor for teaching. The award recognizes teaching that incites curiosity in students, engages them in the enterprise of learning, and has a lifelong impact. More>

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Study: Soil Could Release More Carbon Than Expected as Climate Warms

Researchers based their findings on a field experiment that, for the first time, explored what happens to organic carbon trapped in soil when all soil layers are warmed. Much of the CO2 originated from deeper layers, indicating that deeper stores of carbon are more sensitive to warming than previously thought. More>

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Jill Banfield to Keynote JGI’s April NeLLi Workshop

Joint Genome Institute collaborator Jill Banfield (EESA) will deliver the keynote talk at the “NeLLi: From New Lineages of Life to New Functions” Workshop, April 5-6 in Walnut Creek. The workshop aims to foster discussions on how to capture, define, quantify, and functionally characterize microbial and viral diversity. Go here for full agenda, speaker lineup, and registration information.

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March 3 Earth Sciences Talk on Climate Change

The Earth and Environmental Sciences Area will host a Distinguished Scientist Seminar featuring Christopher Field of Stanford University on Friday at 10:30 a.m. in the Building 66 Auditorium. Field will discuss “Climate Change: 2017.” More>

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Feb. 17 EESA Talk on Secure Energy for America

On Friday at 10:30 a.m. in the Building 66 Auditorium, the Earth and Environmental Sciences Area will host a Distinguished Scientist Seminar featuring Scott Tinker of the University of Texas at Austin. Tinker will discuss “Secure Energy for America.” More>

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Three Lab Researchers Named to National Academy of Engineering

Robert Budnitz of the Earth and Environmental Sciences Area, Gerbrand Ceder of the Materials Sciences Division, and Kathy Yelick, Associate Lab Director of Computing Sciences, were elected to the National Academy of Engineering in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. More>

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