Today at Berkeley Lab

Vern Paxson Receives 2015 IEEE Internet Award

Computing Science’s Vern Paxson is a co-recipient of the 2015 IEEE Internet Award for exceptional contributions to the advancement of Internet technology. He and co-recipient KC Claffy were recognized for their “seminal contributions to the field of Internet measurement, including security and network data analysis.” More>

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Lab to House Intel Parallel Computing Center

Codes for studying climate change, chemistry are focus of collaboration. More>

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Computing’s Jon Bashor Honored for Outreach Efforts

Communications Manager Voted ‘Volunteer of the Year’ by Albany High School for Organizing Career Day at the Lab for students. More>

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Quantum Computing Talk on May 6

D-Wave imageRepresentatives from D-Wave, the first commercial quantum computing company, will discuss the company’s technologies at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 6, in Bldg. 50A-5132. The presentation will briefly review D-Wave and its products – which claims to have built the world’s first commercial quantum computing systems. D-Wave has created a unique quantum computer that uses superconducting circuits to create systems with up to 500 qubits in a “quantum annealing” architecture. The talk will cover the hardware, architecture, programming models and some applications. The company released its first commercial system, the D-Wave One™ quantum computer in 2010. In 2013, D-Wave shipped its 512-qubit D-Wave Two™ system.

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Simulations Show Overcoming Ion Instabilities in Hot Plasma Boost Fusion Reactor’s Output

For decades, controlled nuclear fusion has held the promise of a safe, clean, sustainable energy source that could help wean the world from fossil fuels. But the challenges of harnessing the power of the sun in an Earth-based nuclear fusion reactor have been many, with much of the progress over the last several years coming in incremental advances.

Now simulations run at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) have shed light on a central piece of the puzzle: the relationship between fast ion particles in the plasma and plasma microturbulence. More>

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Memorial Service for Suzanne Stevenson

A public memorial service will be held for Suzanne Stevenson at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 29, at the El Cerrito Kingdom Hall, located at 532 Elm Street. Stevenson, who died Feb. 16, was working as an administrative assistant at NERSC and had filled other roles within Computing Sciences since 2006, starting out in the Computational Research Division. El Cerrito Kingdom Hall is a three-minute walk from the El Cerrito Plaza BART station. Parking is limited.

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Computing’ Daniela Ushizima Shows Students How Math, Imaging Relate

Last week, seventh-grade students at Oakland’s Head-Royce School got a special math lesson from Berkeley Lab’s Daniela Ushizima. She connected their advanced linear algebra lessons to how images are processed and manipulated by computers, including popular apps many students use on their phones. More>

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Simulations Shed Light on Pine Island Glacier’s Stability

The rapid retreat of Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier (PIG)—the single largest contributor to sea level rise in Antarctica—has perhaps reached a point of no return. Unless the region experiences much colder conditions the retreat will continue, say three international modeling teams writing in Nature Climate Change. They came to this conclusion after running a number of simulations to model the glacier’s behavior. To do this work, the researchers relied on three different ice-flow models including BISICLES, which was developed by a collaboration that included Berkeley Lab computational scientists. More>

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Horst Simon Quoted in Time Article on Japan’s Planned Exascale Supercomputer

Just six years from now, Japan-based RIKEN says it will complete a supercomputer finally capable of mongo-calculative deftness on par with what some believe to be the processing oomph of a single human brain. The company says it was selected by Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology to design an exascale supercomputer, and that this nascent exa-behemoth will begin working in 2020. But some think 2020′s too soon. Berkeley Lab’s Horst Simon is betting that we won’t reach exascale-computing power by 2020. More>

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IceCube Makes ‘Top Story’ Lists; Materials Database Gets Cover Treatment

Scientific American named the recent IceCube observation of high-energy cosmic neutrinos one of its top 10 science stories of the year, while Physical Review listed the discovery as one of its highlights of the year. Scientific American also included a cover story (pictured) on creating a materials database written by EETD’s Kristin Persson, who touched on the Lab’s efforts in this field.

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