Today at Berkeley Lab

Nanoscale Virus Features Reconstructed From Correlations of Scattered X-rays

As part of an international team, Lab researchers with the Center for the Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA) contributed key algorithms which helped achieve a goal first proposed more than 40 years ago – using angular correlations of X-ray snapshots from non-crystalline molecules to determine the 3D structure of important biological objects. More>

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Lab Hosts Nov. 17 West Coast ROM Workshop

The 2017 West Coast ROM Workshop, a CAMERA-sponsored event, will be held on Nov. 17 at Berkeley Lab. The workshop aims to bring together local researchers to discuss advances in the field of reduced-order modeling and to initiate new collaborations. We invite those interested to register. Registration is free, but enrollment is limited. More>

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Exascale Co-Design Center Bears Early Fruit

Just one year after DOE’s Exascale Computing Program began funding projects to prepare scientific applications for exascale supercomputers, the Block-Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Co-Design Center has released a new version of its software that solves a benchmark problem hundreds of times faster than the original baseline. More>

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Quantum Computation to Tackle Fundamental Science Problems

Two Berkeley Lab teams will receive $3 million per year in DOE funding to develop near-term quantum computing platforms and tools to be used for scientific discovery in the chemical sciences. One team will develop novel algorithms, compiling techniques and scheduling tools, while the other team will design prototype four- and eight-qubit processors to compute these new algorithms. More>

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Predicting Unruly Plasma Behavior with Simulations

Multiscale gyrokinetic simulations at NERSC are helping to determine whether electron energy transport in a tokamak plasma discharge is multiscale in nature. Being able to accurately predict electron energy transport is critical for predicting performance in future reactors such as ITER, currently under construction in France. More>

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CRD’s Mauro Del Ben Wins IBM Research Prize

Mauro Del Ben, a postdoc in the Computational Research Division’s Computational Chemistry, Materials and Climate Group, has been awarded the IBM Research Forschungspreis (research prize) for his Ph.D. thesis on “Efficient Non-Local Dynamical Electron Correlation for Condensed Matter Simulations.” More>

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Students, Faculty Head Back to School, but a Few Stay on With CRD

Nearly all of the summer students and guest faculty working in Computing Sciences are back home, preparing for the new school year. But not all of them. Rafael Zamora and Tom Corcoran from Hood College in Maryland had their stays extended as they apply deep learning to classifying protein structures that could lead to more effective cancer-fighting drugs. More>

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Science & Snacks Featured at Computing’s Summer Student Poster Session

Staff are invited to the Computing Sciences Summer Student program poster session from 10 a.m. to noon on Thursday, August 3, in Wang Hall (Bldg. 59) room 3101. Enjoy light snacks, recognize the work of tomorrow’s scientists, and maybe even learn something new. Computational Research Division, ESnet and NERSC staff mentor Computing summer students. More>

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‘Hindcasting’ Study Investigates the Extreme 2013 Colorado Flood

In 2013, severe storms struck Colorado, causing the Platte River to reach flood levels higher than ever recorded. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting regional model, Lab researchers “hindcast” the conditions that led to the flooding around Boulder and found that climate change attributed to human activity made the storm much more severe than would otherwise occurred. More>

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New Data Archive to Amplify Ecosystem Research Impact

As scientists move towards understanding earth systems at greater resolutions, access to needed data sets is critical. Yet much of these data are not archived, publicly available, or collected in a standardized format. With $3.6 million from DOE, Computing Sciences and the Earth & Environmental Sciences Areas are partnering on an archiving project. More>

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