Today at Berkeley Lab

Assessing Regional Earthquake Risk and Hazards in the Age of Exascale

With emerging exascale supercomputers, scientists will soon be able to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail. A team of researchers is building the first-ever end-to-end simulation code to precisely capture the geology and physics of regional earthquakes, and how the shaking impacts buildings. More>

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How Berkeley Lab Software Helped Lead to the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics

The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to scientists in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration who discovered gravitational waves. Software tools developed by researchers in the Lab’s Computational Research Division played a key role in enabling the analysis of the vast quantities of data generated by LIGO. More> ESnet also had a part to play. Go here to learn more.

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Berkeley Lab Aims to Strengthen the Cybersecurity of the Grid

As the grid modernizes, communications between the grid and solar panels will standardize, providing both better resiliency as well as a vulnerability that could be exploited by hackers. A new Lab project led by Sean Peisert and Dan Arnold will develop tools to detect and counter cyber attacks on the grid. The project has been awarded up to $2.5 million by DOE. More>

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DOE 40th Anniversary Milestone: Berkeley Lab’s FastBit

The DOE is celebrating its 40th anniversary by highlighting 40 science accomplishments over 40 days. A recent highlight featured Berkeley Lab’s FastBit. Developed in the Computational Research Division, the technology, which speeds up searches through giant datasets, won an R&D100 Award in 2008. More>

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CRD’s Mauro Del Ben Wins IBM Research Prize

Mauro Del Ben, a postdoc in the Computational Research Division’s Computational Chemistry, Materials and Climate Group, has been awarded the IBM Research Forschungspreis (research prize) for his Ph.D. thesis on “Efficient Non-Local Dynamical Electron Correlation for Condensed Matter Simulations.” More>

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Students, Faculty Head Back to School, but a Few Stay on With CRD

Nearly all of the summer students and guest faculty working in Computing Sciences are back home, preparing for the new school year. But not all of them. Rafael Zamora and Tom Corcoran from Hood College in Maryland had their stays extended as they apply deep learning to classifying protein structures that could lead to more effective cancer-fighting drugs. More>

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Targeting Better Cancer Drugs Through Lab Partnership

University of Kentucky professor Sally Ellingson and student Derek Jones spent the summer in the Lab’s Computational Research Division working on a model that uses machine learning to assess how drugs bind with proteins. Their work is sponsored by a Lab partnership that allows Ellingson to extend national lab research opportunities to students interested in computational science. More>

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Five Lab Researchers Receive DOE Early Career Research Awards

Lab recipients include Nick Bouskill, Charlie Koven, and Neslihan Taş Baas of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Qiang Du of Engineering, and Mariam Kiran of the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet). Additionally, Lin Lin of the Computational Research Division and Eric Neuscamman of the Chemical Sciences Division received Early Career awards through UC Berkeley. More>

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CRD’s Will Pazner Wins First Place at AIAA Aviation Forum

Pazner, a graduate student researcher in the Computational Research Division’s Mathematics Group, won first place in the computational fluid dynamics category of a student paper competition hosted by the 2017 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Aviation Forum with his paper “High-Order DNS and LES simulations Using an Implicit Tensor-Product Discontinuous Galerkin Method.” More>

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Will Brain-Inspired Chips Make a Dent in Science’s Big Data Problems?

Although neuromorphic computing is still in its infancy, researchers in Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division hope that these tiny, low-power, brain-inspired computing systems could one day help alleviate some of science’s big data challenges. With funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, two groups of researchers are exploring how science might benefit from this new technology. More>

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