Today at Berkeley Lab

Unraveling the Mysteries of Carbonic Acid

Chemical scientist Rich Saykally led a study that revealed how gaseous carbon dioxide molecules dissolve in water to initiate the chemistry that yields carbonic acid and bicarbonate. Though carbonic acid exists for only a tiny fraction of a second, it imparts a lasting impact on Earth’s atmosphere and geology, as well as on the human body. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Leaving on a Biofueled Jet Plane

Berkeley Lab’s Alex Bell, Corinne Scown and Dean Toste have developed a catalytic process for converting sugarcane biomass into a new class of aviation fuel and lubricant base oils that could help biorefineries achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80-percent. The work was conducted at the Energy Biosciences Institute. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Lab Researchers Among Five Faculty Named Bakar Fellows

Among the latest to join the ranks of the Bakar Fellows Program, which supports UC Berkeley faculty working to apply scientific discoveries to real-world issues, are Ke Xu (pictured) of the Life Sciences Division, who works on super-resolution microscopy, and Holger Müller, a guest scientist in the Chemical Sciences Division, whose miniaturized interferometric inertial sensor can determine its own location without any external cues. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Head-Gordon, Neumark, Nogales Elected to National Academy of Sciences

The academy is the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science organization. This year’s fellows include Martin Head-Gordon (left) and Daniel Neumark (center) of the Chemical Sciences Division, and Eva Nogales of the Life Sciences Division. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Prospects of Doing Attosecond Physics at the World’s First Laser-Driven X-Ray User Facility

Predrag Ranitovic will present the scientific roadmap of ELI-ALPS and give an overview of the laser and attosceond pulse sources, and endstations to be available for users in the near future, in the Building 50 Auditorium on April 29 from noon to 1 p.m. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Major Artificial Photosynthesis Advance Poses Environmental Win/Win

Peidong Yang, Christopher Chang, and Michelle Chang led a potentially game-changing breakthrough. By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, they created a solar-powered system in which valuable chemical products can be produced from sequestered carbon dioxide. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Lab to Host April 10 Symposium on Radiological Resilience

The event will provide an opportunity to discuss topics related to the current needs for increasing societal resilience to radiological and other events. The symposium will include speakers from research and academic institutions as well as community representatives from Japan and California. Registration required. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Durbin Lecture on Medical Response to Nuclear or Radiological Incident

C. Norman Coleman of the National Institutes of Health will present the next Pat Durbin Memorial Lecture on April 1, at 4 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. He will discuss ““Preparing and Responding To the Health and Medical Consequences of a Nuclear or Radiological Incident: The Essential Roles for Science, Complex Systems and Service.” More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

The Cosmic Barbecue and the Science of Combustion

During combustion, simple carbon compounds grow into complex lattices. A popular model describing that growth process has now passed its first experimental test. Berkeley Lab’s Musa Ahmed and Tyler Troy write about it in Physics Today. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Q&A With Joy Leggett: Celebrating Black History Month and STEM

In honor of Black History Month, Chemical Sciences postdoc Joy (Christina) Leggett shares her professional background, personal experiences, and perspective on engaging underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.