Today at Berkeley Lab

Chemical Sciences Division Hosts Inaugural Postdoc Retreat

The agenda for the July 21 event included research presentations, discussions on diversity, inclusion, and implicit bias, a presentation by the Berkeley Lab Postdoc Association, a Chemical Sciences “Alumni Highlight” showcasing opportunities after Lab postdoctoral work, and a career development workshop. More>

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Adding Cobalt Keeps Technetium From Leaving During Waste Processing

When Technetium is heated for long-term storage, this radionuclide is able to migrate, making it difficult to meet DOE retention targets. A team including the Lab’s Wayne Lukens, and researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the DOE’s Office of River Protection, using NERSC, devised a way to retain more technetium. They added cobalt. More>

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On the Path Toward Bionic Enzymes

Berkeley Lab chemists have successfully married chemistry and biology to create reactions never before possible. They did this by replacing the iron normally found in the muscle protein myoglobin with iridium, a noble metal not known to be used by living systems. More>

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Chemical ‘Sponges’ Soak Up Toxic Cancer-fighting Drugs After Targeting Tumors

Researchers are creating materials for a cancer treatment system that can limit the side effects of chemotherapy drugs by quickly removing them from the body after use. The device can be inserted via a tiny tube into a vein, then soaks up most of these drugs like a sponge. More>

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Copper is Key in Burning Fat, New Study Finds

A new study led by a Berkeley Lab scientist and UC Berkeley professor establishes for the first time copper’s role in fat metabolism, further burnishing the metal’s reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology. More>

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Scientists Find Surprising Link Between Rain and Airborne Particles

Rain’s reputation for cleansing the air may come with a caveat after new study findings show that they play a role in generating airborne organic particles. The findings could influence how scientists model our planet’s climate and future. The research was conducted in part by Mary Gilles of the Chemical Sciences Division. More>

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May 4 Durbin Lecture on Radiometals in PET

The 7th annual Pat Durbin Memorial Lecture will be held May 4, at 4 p.m. in the Building 50 Auditorium. The Glenn T. Seaborg Center of the Chemical Sciences Division will host refreshments at 3:30 p.m., followed by a lecture on “Radiometals in PET: How Chelate Chemistry Informs in vivo Imaging of Disease” by Carolyn Anderson from the University of Pittsburgh. More>

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Scientists Part the Clouds on How Droplets Form

A new study reveals that much more is going on at the microscopic level of cloud formation than previously thought. Scientists have determined that organic molecules effectively depressed the surface tension of the water, allowing for more efficient formation of bigger cloud droplets. This research could influence climate models. More>

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Nov. 18 Burris Cunningham Lecture Features Darleane Hoffman

The Glenn Seaborg Center will host a reception at 3:30 p.m., followed by the 4 p.m. lecture in the Building 50 Auditorium. Speaker Darleane Hoffman will discuss “Frontier Research on the Heaviest Elements – From Ultramicrochemical to Atom-at-a-Time Techniques.” Cunningham is famed for isolating a visible quantity of a synthetic chemical element.

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Soaking Up Carbon Dioxide and Turning it into Valuable Products

Chris Chang (Chemical Sciences) and Omar Yaghi (Materials Sciences) led a study in which covalent organic frameworks were embedded with cobalt porphyrins to produce a molecular system that that not only absorbs carbon dioxide, but also selectively reduces it to carbon monoxide, a primary building block for a wide range of chemical products. More>

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