Today at Berkeley Lab

New Genome Regulation Mechanism Found; Could Improve Gene Therapy

The same mechanisms that separate mixtures of oil and water may also help the organization of an unusual part of our DNA called heterochromatin. The work by Lab researchers addresses a long-standing question about how DNA functions are organized in space and time, including how genes are silenced or expressed. More>

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Energy Secretary Perry Lauds California’s National Labs During China Trip

The Bay Area Council recently went to China for a global conference on climate change. The delegation, which included the Lab’s Jay Keasling and Alecia Ward, met with Rick Perry to discuss the important role of California’s national labs, including Berkeley Lab and Lawrence Livermore Lab, in advancing clean energy technology. Perry called California’s labs “crown jewels.” More>

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Murayama, Doudna Contribute to Book Celebrating Centennial of Einstein Theory

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, the Einstein Legacy Project is collecting the visions of 100 leading innovators, artists, scientists, and visionaries in the world’s first 3D-printed book. Lab physicist Hitoshi Murayama and bioscientist Jennifer Doudna are among the “genius” contributors, along with former Lab Director Steve Chu. More>

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Green Alga Sequencing Could Advance Clean Energy, Bioproducts

Scientists have sequenced the genome of a green alga that has drawn commercial interest as a strong producer of quality lipids for biofuel production. The chromosome-assembly genome of Chromochloris zofingiensis provides a blueprint for new discoveries in sustainable biofuels, antioxidants, and other valuable bioproducts. More>

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Scientists Sequence Genome of Snail That Spreads Parasitic Worm

A team of international scientists has characterized the genome of a freshwater snail that is instrumental in transmitting a parasitic worm to humans. The achievement could help researchers disrupt the life cycle of B. glabrata with the goal of eliminating schistosomiasis, an infectious disease known as snail fever. More>

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Berkeley Public Schools Fund Honors Biosciences’ Mary Wildermuth

Wildermuth was recently honored at the Berkeley Public Schools Fund Spring Luncheon for her contributions. Wildermuth developed “Be a Scientist,” a seventh-grade program that matches 200 UC Berkeley science mentors with individual students at Berkeley’s three middle schools to help them learn about scientific inquiry and investigation. The Lab is a longtime luncheon sponsor.

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Designing Cyclic Oligomers: Greater Than the Sum of Their Parts

Cyclic proteins that assemble from multiple identical subunits (homo-oligomers) play key roles in many biological processes, including cell signaling and enzymatic catalysis and protein function. Lab bioscientists worked with the University of Washington’s David Baker, who led a team to design in silico and crystallize self-assembling cyclic homo-oligomer proteins. More>

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Lab Staff Volunteer at East Bay STEM Career Awareness Day

Volunteers from the Biosciences and Earth and Environmental Sciences areas, and Government & Community Relations Office, recently participated in East Bay STEM Career Awareness Day. At the event, 300 high school students learned about STEM careers through tours and conversations with STEM professionals. Go here for more on Biosciences’ and here for EESA’s participation.

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Biosciences’ Rasha Anayah — Changing the World through Research

Among the benefits of attending the University of California is the chance for undergrads to conduct research alongside world-renowned faculty. Rasha Anayah of the Biosciences Area, who is exploring how to build better biofuels, was one of several undergrads who recently spoke at a forum on UC research opportunities. More>

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10 Things You Should Know About Louise Lassalle

Lassalle, a postdoc in the Biosciences Area and native of France, married into nobility, loves to play BANG, and at one time had presidential aspirations. Go here to learn more about Lassalle, who is currently researching a protein that transforms water into oxygen. Are there 10 things we should know about you, or someone you work with? If so, send an email to communications@lbl.gov.

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