Today at Berkeley Lab

New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

Researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. The technology could have wide-ranging applications for batteries, catalysis, and energetic materials. More>

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ALS Work Gives a Lift to Research on Spark Plug–Free Engines

Measurements taken at the Lab’s Advanced Light Source are boosting research on highly efficient auto engines that use chemically controlled ignition systems rather than spark plugs. Sandia researchers used the ALS to study the components in the system’s chemical mix, which included burned gases and injected fuel. More>

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Director’s Update on the Advanced Light Source Upgrade

At the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee review in Washington, D.C. last week, the committee unanimously approved a subcommittee’s recommendation that the ALS-U is “ready to initiate construction.” Director Michael Witherell, who is part of the ALS-U team, attended the BESAC review and provides an update. More>

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Hewlett Packard Labs Gains Insights with Innovative ALS Research Tools

For the past eight years, Hewlett Packard Labs, the central research organization of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, has been using cutting-edge ALS techniques to advance some of their most promising technological research, including vanadium dioxide phase transitions and atomic movement during memristor operation. More>

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Shutting Out Ebola and Other Viruses With the Help of the ALS

Researchers have used protein crystallography at the Advanced Light Source to understand how a drug molecule that has shown some efficacy against Ebola in mice inactivates a membrane protein, called TPC1, used by viruses to infect host cells. More>

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Surprising New Properties in a 2-D Semiconductor Discovered

A new class of semiconductor was discovered that is only three atoms thick and which extends in a two-dimensional plane, similar to graphene. These 2-D semiconductors, have exceptional optical characteristics, and could lead to improved semiconductors or new functionalities. More>

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Joint Foundry/ALS Seminar Featuring Christopher Kemper Ober on May 17

The Molecular Foundry and ALS will jointly host a seminar on “Fifty Years of Moore’s Law: Towards Fabrication at Molecular Dimensions” by Christopher Kemper Ober from Cornell University. The talk begins at 11 a.m. in the Building 66 Auditorium. More>

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ALS Aids Best-Ever Views of Mercury Transit

A stunning video of the transit of Mercury across the Sun was made possible in part by work done at the Advanced Light Source. The multilayer mirrors used in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were calibrated and tested at ALS Beamline 6.3.2 before being launched into space in 2010. More>

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Research at ALS Improves Conductive Plastic for Health, Energy

Biological implants that communicate with the brain to control paralyzed limbs or provide vision to the blind are one step closer to reality thanks to research by scientists at Washington State University. The work was conducted at the Advanced Light Source. More>

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Another Successful Nuclear Science Day for Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts

On April 23, over 200 girl and boy scouts and their leaders participated in the 6th annual Nuclear Science Day for Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. Nuclear Science Division, the Advanced Light Source and Workforce Development & Education department co-sponsored this event. Go here to view images from the event, and here for tweets.

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