Today at Berkeley Lab

Self-Assembly of a Programmable DNA Lattice

The use of DNA for nanotechnology has gained interest because it’s a highly “programmable” polymer with “sticky ends” that can self-assemble into molecular scaffolds for other molecules, such as proteins and viruses. Researchers have designed and crystallized two related DNA scaffolds and determined their structures at the Advanced Light Source. More>

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When Rocket Science Meets X-ray Science: Part 4…Knowing Meteors Better

X-ray studies of meteorite samples, conducted by NASA and Berkeley Lab researchers, could help gauge threats to Earth by providing new insights on the microscopic makeup of asteroids and how they break up in the atmosphere. This is the final installment of a four-part series. More>

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When Rocket Science Meets X-ray Science: Part Three…Parachute Design

X-ray-based experiments at the Lab will simulate—in microscopic detail—spacecraft parachute fabric performance in the extreme conditions of other planets’ atmospheres. This is the third installment of a four-part series. More>

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When X-ray Science Meets Rocket Science: Part Two…The Heat is On

NASA is developing a new family of flexible heat-shield systems with a woven carbon-fiber based material, and is using X-rays at the Lab’s Advanced Light Source to test the designs. This is installment two of a four-part series. More>

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When Rocket Science Meets X-ray Science

NASA and Lab researchers have teamed up to explore next-generation spacecraft materials at the microscale using an X-ray technique that produces 3-D images. This work could help ensure future spacecraft survive the rigors of otherworldly atmospheres. This is the first in a four-part series. More>

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ALS Helps Reveal Two Basic Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Drugs

The structures of proteins controlling calcium-ion transport through cell membranes have been revealed, bound to two drugs known as calcium channel blockers. The discovery might accelerate the development of safer and more effective drugs for treating cardiovascular disorders such as high blood pressure, chest pain, and irregular heartbeat. More>

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Tours for Staff to Explore the Heart of the Advanced Light Source

The Advanced Light Source is currently shut down for scheduled maintenance. Over the next few weeks, Chief of Operations Michael Banda is offering guided tours of the ALS, including storage ring and injector viewing. Go here to register. Each tour is limited to 10 people.

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Jan. 31 Joint Foundry/ALS Seminar Features UCLA’s Yang Yang

Yang will discuss “Interface and Intermediate Phases Engineering for Achieving Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells” at 11 a.m. in the Building 66 Auditorium. The seminar is jointly hosted by the Molecular Foundry and the Advanced Light Source. More>

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Altered States in Graphene Heterostructures

Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy directly reveals for the first time how electronic states are altered when epitaxial graphene is deposited on a substrate of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The interaction between the materials in this heterostructure greatly improves its suitability for advanced, ultralow-power device applications. More>

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Designed Metalloprotein Provides Stable Platform for Further Development

Bioscientists have characterized a novel self-assembling homotrimer designed by researchers at the University of Washington. The team performed X-ray crystallography of the protein at the Advanced Light Source to show that the combination of computational design and novel amino acids can be used to generate new protein function. More>

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