Today at Berkeley Lab

$2.4 Million From Moore Foundation For New Technique Developed at ALS

A novel X-ray scattering concept by researchers at the Advanced Light Source is receiving support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation in the amount of $2.4 million. The lead investigator is ALS Division Deputy Zahid Hussain, with ALS Director Roger Falcone acting as co-PI on the project. More>

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A Fullerene That Breaks the Rules

Scientists used small-molecule x-ray crystallography to verify and characterize the first non-functionalized fullerene with a heptagonal ring in the cage. This new molecule changes the definition of a classical fullerene and expands the range of structural possibilities for endohedral fullerenes. More>

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Peptoid Nanosheets Offer a Diversity of Functionalities

ALS researchers have recently developed peptoid nanosheets that self-assemble at an oil-water interface. This new development opens the door to designing nanosheets with more structural complexity and chemical functionality for improved chemical sensors and separators, and safer, more effective drug delivery vehicles. More>

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X-Ray Microscopy: The First 120 Years

Join Janos Kirz at noon today in USB 15-253 for this special ALS Colloquium. From Rontgen’s fantastic discovery of “new rays” in 1896, to the development of new x ray-sources, techniques, optics, and detectors, Kirz will trace the exciting evolution of x-ray science.

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180 Scouts Participate in Nuclear Science Day Event

The teens used a Geiger counter to survey radiation, built an electroscope to see how different radiation detectors work, participated in a career forum, and attended lectures. All participants received a patch. The April 8 event was hosted by the Nuclear Science Division, the Advanced Light Source, and Workforce Development and Education.

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A Milky Mystery: The Case of the Casein Micelles

We all know that milk contains important nutrients such as calcium and protein that help build bones and muscle. But how much do we really know about these ingredients at the molecular level? Researchers used the Advance Light Source’s 11.0.1 beamline to find out. More>

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Organic Photovoltaic Experiments Showcase ‘Superfacility’ Concept

Research by the Advanced Light Source, using computing resources at NERSC, Oakridge, and ESNet, is yielding exciting results in organic photovoltaics as well as road testing the “superfacility” concept, which connects DOE user facilities to enable researchers to share data in real time without having to leave their office or lab. More>

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Research Shows Why Skin is Resistant to Tearing

Materials scientist Rob Ritchie led a Berkeley Lab and UC San Diego team at the Advanced Light Source that recorded the first direct observations of the micro-scale mechanisms behind the ability of skin to resist tearing. The results could aid the improvement of artificial skin, or the development of thin film polymers for flexible electronics. More>

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Protein Instability and Lou Gherig’s Disease Explored at the ALS

A new study uses small-angle x-ray scattering as well as several advanced biophysical techniques to link protein instability to the progression of a lethal degenerative disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. More>

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Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes in Technology, Life

Terra sigillata ceramics were the most famous ancient tableware produced during the Roman period. Scientists investigated terra sigillata samples using the Advanced Light Source and found significant differences in mineral compositions between the Italic and Gallic samples — which suggests modifications in the manufacturing process. More>

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