Today at Berkeley Lab

A Multifunctional Material With Electric-Field Control

With the flip of a switch, three distinct crystalline phases can be induced in one material, each phase exhibiting different properties desirable for a wide range of applications, from smart windows to spintronics. Soft X-ray techniques at the Advanced Light Source helped verify and clarify the mechanism behind the phase transformations. More>

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DOE Oppenheimer Leadership Program Participants Visit the Lab

The DOE’s Oppenheimer Science and Energy Leadership Program develops the next generation of leaders in the science and energy fields. The initiative brings together exceptional early- and mid-career professionals who have the potential to contribute significantly to DOE’s work. The 2017 cohort recently visited the Lab, touring the Advanced Light Source and the Molecular Foundry (pictured).

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Protein Complex Shows Promise for Berkelium Separation

A protein, siderocalin, shows promise for separating berkelium from other actinides. To gain greater insight into how, researchers performed x-ray crystallography on siderocalin-actinide complexes at the Advanced Light Source. More>

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July 26 Talk on Diffraction Limited Storage Rings and Free Electron Lasers

Wolfgang Eberhardt of the Center for Free Electron Laser Science will give a July 26 talk on experiments unique to both DLSR and FEL instruments, emphasizing the need for both types of light source to meet the challenges of future science and society. The event, sponsored by the Advanced Light Source, takes place at 3 p.m. in Building 15-253. More>

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ALS Gives Intel a Closer Look at Microelectronic Packages

Intel has been using the tomography capabilities at the Advanced Light Source’s Beamline 8.3.2 to image microelectronic packages in 3-D at high resolution with short throughput time. This research has provided Intel with valuable information for both failure analysis and product development. More>

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‘Science Friday’ Episode Featured Roman Concrete Study

Advanced Light Source user Marie Jackson from the University of Utah joined Ira Flatow, host of the public-radio talk show “Science Friday,” on July 7 to discuss her work on 2,000-year-old Roman concrete, and what makes this ancient material so durable. More>

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New Studies of Ancient Concrete Teach Us to Do as the Romans Did

A new look inside 2,000-year-old concrete — made from volcanic ash, lime, and seawater — has provided new clues to the evolving chemistry and mineral cements that allow ancient harbor structures to withstand the test of time. More>

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Strain Makes Excellent ‘Control Knob’ for Defect Engineering

Crystal defects such as missing oxygen ions in transition-metal oxides can lead to potentially useful material properties. X-ray studies at the Advanced Light Source have helped open up a promising route to designing and controlling oxygen-vacancy-type defects through the systematic application of coherent tensile strain. More>

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Director’s Update on ALS Leadership

After 10 years as director of the Advanced Light Source, Roger Falcone has decided to step down from this role to return to teaching and research at UC Berkeley. In addition, on January 1 he will begin a term as president of the American Physical Society, following a long list of distinguished physicists who have served in this role. More>

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What’s on Your Skin? Archaea, That’s What

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms — and they’re not just bacteria. Hoi-Ying Holman, director of the Berkeley Synchrotron Infrared Structural Biology Program, collaborated on a study that found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving microbe, and that the amount of it varies with age. More>

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