Today at Berkeley Lab

SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

Some science mysteries can only be explained on a nanometer scale, with the help of synchrotron light sources. But a recent deluge of data is making it harder to process and analyze data. The ALS, Computational Research Division, and National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center have teamed to help make this process more streamlined. More>

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Mysteries of Space Dust Revealed

The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA’s Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks, which likely originated from beyond our solar system, are more complex in composition and structure than previously imagined. More>

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ALS Research on Ebola Featured in BBC News Story

Advanced Light Source user Erica Ollman Saphire (Scripps Institute) used the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology beamlines to study and solve structures of Ebola virus glycoprotein bound to antibodies. This work was recently featured on BBC News.

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Toyota Collaborates With the ALS and Molecular Foundry

Toyota has been working at the ALS for a few years now to gain deeper insight into the chemistry of electrolytes for use in magnesium-ion batteries, with the hope of creating a fully developed magnesium-based battery technology that would replace lithium-ion batteries with essentially twice the energy in the same volume. More>

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Graphene’s 3D Counterpart

ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene — the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon. The discovery holds promise for the high-¬tech industry, including faster transistors and more compact hard drives. More>

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Intriguing DNA Editor Has a Structural Trigger

The molecular structures of two proteins from a family of genome-editing enzymes reveal how they target and cleave DNA. The results point the way to the rational design of new and improved versions of the enzymes for basic research and genetic engineering. More>

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Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

Computer chips have gotten smaller thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years is called Moore’s Law. But one component of the chip-making process needs of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist. More>

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ALS Helps Researchers Figure Out How to Make More Efficient Fuel Cells

Using high-brilliance X-rays at the Advanced Light Source, researchers track the process that fuel cells use to produce electricity, knowledge that will help make large-scale alternative energy power systems more practical and reliable. More>

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An Inside Look at a MOF in Action

Researchers have recorded the first in situ electronic-structure observations of the adsorption of carbon dioxide inside Mg-MOF-74, an open-metal-site MOF that has emerged as one of the most promising materials for capturing and storing greenhouse gases. More>

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ALS Capabilities Reveal Multiple Functions of Ebola Virus

Researchers at the ALS have demonstrated that a protein of Ebola virus, termed VP40, undergoes dramatic refolding rearrangements to achieve three entirely different structures for three entirely separate functions in the virus life cycle. More>

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