Today at Berkeley Lab

Archives for March 2017

ALS Measurements Overturn Decade-Old Theory

Materials that shift between being a metal and an insulator are of interest for use in electronic devices and fundamental studies. One such material, vanadium sesquioxide, has had an accepted theory explaining its metal-to-insulator transition since 2007. Now, researchers report on ALS measurements that overturn that theory and provide a benchmark test for future models. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Abergel Receives Rising Star Award From American Chemical Society

Chemical scientist Rebecca Abergel is among six winners of the award, which recognizes “outstanding women scientists approaching mid-level careers who have demonstrated outstanding promise for contributions to their respective fields.” The award is presented by the American Chemical Society’s Women Chemist Committee.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Shyh Wang Hall Achieves LEED Gold

Shyh Wang Hall is among the Lab’s six buildings with LEED certification, with one Platinum and five Gold certifications. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is a green building certification that rates a building’s sustainability aspects, including indoor environmental quality and the efficient use of water, energy, and materials. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

In a Sample of Blood, Researchers Probe for Cancer Clues

One day, patients may be able to monitor their body’s response to cancer therapy just by having their blood drawn. A new study, led by Berkeley Lab’s Amy Herr (Biosciences), has taken an important step in that direction by measuring a panel of cancer proteins in rare, individual tumor cells that float in the blood. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

A Pioneering Study on Amazon Windthrows

Earth and Environmental Sciences Area researchers have published the first study on windthrow variability, focusing on central Amazonia. Windthrows destroy large swaths of trees, play a significant role in forest structures and dynamics, and affect carbon storage. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Mary Maxon: Inspiring Women in Sciences

Maxon (Biosciences Area) recently visited UC San Francisco to discuss the ways in which women can impact science policy at the state and national level. “Impact is as simple as a phone call, it is as simple as an email, and it really does matter,” she said. “Use it: your research and ideas can have a role in shaping future policy.” More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

April is Earth Month: Lab Hosts Special Events

As part of the Lab’s celebration of Earth Month, staff can explore food sustainability through a traveling art show, learn about the Lab’s energy use through new online data systems, or discover special moments in the natural history of the Lab, among other activities. Subscribe to the Sustainable Berkeley Lab calendar, or go here for more.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Researchers Invited to Share Field Work Experiences on AGU Blog, Social Media

The American Geophysical Union invites researchers to share their adventures in field work on its new blog, The Field. Send an e-mail here to have your information considered. The AGU is also looking for scientists and science communicators to take over its Instagram account with images from recent fieldwork. Submit photos here.

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Ancient Ocean Temperatures Recorded in Mother-of-Pearl

To understand what the climate will be like in the future, it’s important to look at what it was like in the past, both on land and in the oceans. Researchers used the Advanced Light Source to help show that nacre tablet thickness — nacre is the iridescent material that lines mollusk shells — is correlated with the temperature of the environment in which the nacre formed. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.

Former Summer Student Jessica Hatcher Wins Research Award

Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences-sponsored summer student Jessica Hatcher won a first-place award for her research poster “Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR) for Biological Effects of Synthetic Cathinones” at the 74th Joint Annual Meeting of The National Institute of Science/Beta Kappa Chi. Hatcher was mentored by CRD’s Bert de Jong in the summer of 2016. More>

You can leave a comment. View the Comment Policy.