Today at Berkeley Lab

Archives for November 2014

Copper on the Brain at Rest

Chemical scientist Chris Chang led a study that shows proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain. Copper mismanagement linked to Wilson’s, Alzheimer’s and other neurological disorders can also contribute to misregulation of signaling in cell−to-cell communications and prevent the normal development of synapses and circuits. More>

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Latest on Mountain Lion Sightings

A mountain lion cub was spotted around noon yesterday running from the top of parking lot D (“the pit”) across the road behind Building 55. This follows two sightings last week on or near Lab property and a deer carcass found over the weekend below Building 90. More>

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Berkeley Lab’s General Purpose Lab New Home for Battery Research

The San Jose Mercury News recently took a look at Berkeley Lab’s new General Purpose Laboratory building, noting that it will be home to the Lab’s portion of the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research battery hub. Researchers Venkat Srinivasan and Brett Helms gave the reporter an overview of what to expect in the coming years. More>

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NERSC wins HPCWire Editors’ Choice Award

NERSC was named one of two recipients of the HPCWire “Editors’ Choice Award for Best HPC Collaboration Between Government & Industry.” Announced at the SuperComputing 2014 conference held in New Orleans last week, the award recognized the center’s partnership with Cray and Intel to deploy in 2016 a manycore supercomputer. More>

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UC Global Food Initiative and Holiday Food Research

Before you dive into that Thanksgiving turkey or apple pie, take a bite of the food research coming from the University of California. UC serves up a cornucopia of food facts just in time for the holiday, including work being done at Berkeley Lab. More>

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Berkeley Algorithms Help Researchers Understand Dark Energy

To unlock the mystery of dark energy and its influence on the universe, researchers must rely on indirect observations. The process of identifying and tracking these objects requires scientists to scrupulously monitor the night sky for slight changes, a task that would be extremely tedious and time-consuming without some novel computational tools developed at NERSC. More>

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Limited Service, Early Close Time for Bay View Café

Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, the cafeteria will offer a limited menu today and will close at 1:30 p.m.

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Lab Staff Volunteer at Girl Scouts’ STEM Career Day Event

Six researchers spent a recent Saturday at NASA Ames sharing their passion for their work through hands-on activities at the Girl Scouts’ “When I Grow Up” Career Day Event. More than 700 girls attended the annual event, which brings together K-12th graders to learn about careers in technology and environment. More>

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Two Berkeley Lab Scientists Named AAAS Fellows

Climate scientist Bill Collins (left) of the Earth Sciences Division and chemist Heinz Frei of the Physical Biosciences Division have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2014. Collins was recognized for “distinguished contributions to the field of climate science through fundamental research on interactions among sunlight, heat, the coupled climate system, and global environmental change.” Frei was recognized for “distinguished contributions to the understanding of photochemical reactions, and, in particular, for the advancement of robust catalysts for solar energy conversion.” More>

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Lab Scientists Learn New Insights Into Tumor-Suppressing Protein

Life scientist Krassimira Botcheva has discovered new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome. She and collaborators concluded that in response to the same stress signal, p53 binds to the human genome in a way that is selective and dependent on cell context. The research has been published in PLOS ONE. More>

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