Today at Berkeley Lab

Archives for April 2013

Four Researchers Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Four Lab researchers have been elected to the 2013 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, an honorary society founded in 1780 to recognize leading “thinkers and doers.” The new members affiliated with Berkeley Lab are (clockwise) Frances Hellman of the Materials Sciences Division, Don Tilley of the Chemical Sciences Division, Susan Marqusee of the Physical Biosciences Division, and Hitoshi Murayama of the Physics Division. All four also hold joint appointments as professors at UC Berkeley. More>

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Does Antimatter Fall Up or Down? Direct Evidence from ALPHA

While it seems sensible to suppose that antimatter interacts with gravity the same way ordinary matter does, there’s never been any direct evidence that this is so. In fact some theorists speculate that antimatter might experience antigravity and fall “up” instead of “down.” Joel Fajans and Jonathan Wurtele of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, members of the ALPHA Collaboration at CERN, have used ALPHA data to make the first direct measurements of the gravitational mass of atoms of antihydrogen, testing how they fall and in what direction. More>

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Polar Bears, Freezing Equipment Among Challenges for Hubbard’s Arctic Research

[PNAS] Last October, when Susan Hubbard and her team pulled sleds full of sensitive sensors across the snow near the northernmost point in Alaska, temperatures hovered in the single digits and low teens (e.g., 8–15 °F). Foremost in the researchers’ minds, aside from collecting data on the frozen ground beneath their feet, were two things: keep an eye out for polar bears and keep their equipment from freezing. Hubbard, an earth scientist at Berkeley Lab, had hired a polar bear guard to deal with the first problem and perfected the art of wrapping pieces of equipment up and periodically warming them in heated huts to deal with the second. More>

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‘How Hot Will It Get?’ Science at the Theater Panel Discussion

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‘Secret Formulas’ BLISS Workshop on Monday, May 6

Lab employees interested in sharing physical science activities with students are invited to participate in an upcoming workshop, Secret Formulas. Learn to guide first graders as they investigate the properties of substances and make their own personal brands of paste, toothpaste, and ice cream. The activities provide experiences with chemistry, cause and effect, and build understanding central to controlled experimentation. The workshop is part of the Lab’s Center for Science and Engineering Education Berkeley Lab in School Settings (BLISS) program. It takes place on Monday, May 6, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Building 7-211. Registration is required. Lunch is provided.

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Comparing Proteins at a Glance

John Tainer and Cynthia McMurray of the Life Sciences Division, working with Greg Hura and Helen Budworth, have developed a revolutionary structural comparison map for the study of proteins and other biological macromolecules with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The map enables researchers at a glance to identify structural similarities and differences between multiple proteins under a variety of conditions. It has already been used at the Advanced Light Source to gain valuable new insight into a prime protein target for cancer chemotherapy. Also contributing to this effort were Kevin Dyer, Robert Rambo and Michal Hammel. More>

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ESnet to Help Create First 100Gbps Research Link Across Atlantic

Six of the world’s leading research and education networks – ESnet, Internet2, NORDUnet, SURFnet, CANARIE and GÉANT – have announced their intent to build the world’s first 100 gigabits-per-second (Gbps) intercontinental transmission links for research and education. The project, called the “Advanced North Atlantic 100G Pilot” or ANA-100G, is aimed at stimulating the market for 100 Gbps intercontinental networking and advancing global networks and applications to benefit research and education. More>

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Bay View Café Debuts New Website, Catering Items; Aussie BBQ on Friday

The Bay View Café has launched a new and improved website that features easy-to-read weekly menus, specials and promotions, catering information, and other activities. Catering customers can now order express lunches that feature salads, wraps, and sandwiches, as well as fruit, cookie, drink, and chips, in one handy box. Celebrate Cinco de Mayo on Friday with special menu items, and a free churro with orders at the taqueria. Friday’s BBQ theme is Australian, with a menu of mixed skewers with spicy mango sauce, smoked marinated skirt steak with herb sauce, kiwi and mint fruit salad, five-bean salad, and potato and veggie salad.

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‘Job Hunting in Academia’ Workshop on May 2

Are you organized for your academic job search? Join Cynthia Fuhrmann on Thursday, May 2, for Job Hunting in Academia Part I (BLI1063), a Berkeley Lab Learning Institute workshop, for tips on refining and tailoring your cover letter, CV, and research and teaching statements to help ensure they stand out from the pack. Fuhrmann, assistant dean of Career & Professional Development at the University of Massachusetts, has a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from UCSF and a Bachelors degree in Chemistry from UC Davis. This session is part of BLI’s Career Development Workshop Series for postdocs and graduate students. Scientists are also welcome to attend. Registration required.

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Next Integrated Bioimaging Seminar on May 1

The next LBNL Integrated Bioimaging Seminar will be held Wednesday, May 1, at 4 p.m. in Building 84-318. The talk will feature Carolyn Larabell of UCSF and the Physical Biosciences Division, who will speak on “Correlated Fluorescence and X-Ray Tomography of Nuclear Organization and Chromatin Topology,” and Paul Ashby, Material Sciences Division, speaking on “New Probes and Algorithms for Imaging Proteins and Cells With High Speed and Resolution Using Atomic Force Microscopy.” Seminars are held the first Wednesday of the month and cover diverse topics in the area of bioimaging. More>

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