New Grizzly Gate Schedule

December 10, 2012

Effective Dec. 12, the inbound lane of the Grizzly Gate will be open from 6:30 to 9:30 a.m. Mondays through Fridays, and automated egress 24/7. Bicycles and pedestrians will be required to use the access gates at the side of each lane. The complete installation of License Plate Reader (LPR) technology at both the Grizzly and Blackberry Gates is scheduled for early next year. More information on the implementation of the LPR can be found here and also will be shared via TABL in the coming weeks.

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12 Responses to “New Grizzly Gate Schedule”

  1. Laurie Westphal says:

    What about the outgoing lane of Grizzly gate? Will that be open in the afternoons to exit LBL?

  2. Lyn says:

    I believe the article said “automated egress 24/7,” which means you can exit whenever you want.

  3. Henry Coles says:

    Is it confusing to anyone else that “implementation of the LPR” refers to the complete system and not just the license plate reader? Suggest thinking of a name that includes the complete system/area. E.g. Grizzly Gate Control, GGC. I don’t know maybe it is just me, I didn’t think that the LPR link was going to describe the complete system.

  4. Henry Coles says:

    Today, it looked like the guards forgot to move the cones to block traffic after 9:30, cars were driving down the ramp on the left and then backing up.

    Re. bikes/peds. entry and exit: Could be a bit more clear e.g.:

    Bikes and pedestrians can exit 24/7 through either pedestrian side gate without a card.
    Can bikes/peds enter at either ped. gate 24/7 with card or is it just the right side gate?

  5. Charles Taberski says:

    Thank you for the update on the Grizzly Gate. After reading the schedule carefully, I still am not sure if bicycle and pedestrian entrance will be allowed (using ID cards) 24/7 at the Grizzly Gate. It is clear that automobile exiting will be 24/7, and that entrance hours for automobiles will be restricted, but bicyclists and pedestrians are not mentioned. Can you clarify this for me?

  6. Corwin Booth says:

    The policy indicates a bike must go through the pedestrian gate, even when the main gate is open. I checked with a guard, and he said the same thing. Why? That makes little sense to me. It can be pretty awkward to have to stop, open, and go through a spring-loaded door with a loaded bike. Yet a bike goes the same speed as the cars going into the lab (on the downhill), and certainly don’t slow folks down much leaving the lab either.

  7. Pat Thomas says:

    It might be helpful to add that the license plate registry is under the Employee Self Service – Parking Permit website.

  8. Arthur Patterson says:

    Thank you for your responses.

    Bicycles and pedestrians can enter (using badge reader) and exit through the designated pedestrian gates 24/7. Bicycles must use the designated Bike/Pedestrian gates for entrance and exit due to Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL) industry safety standards.

    Vehicles can use the exit gate 24/7.

    Instructional videos will be posted early next year and will guide users through registering and using the License Plate Reader (LPR) technology.

  9. Paul Cook says:

    As currently understandable I think there are some flaws in the current Grizzly Gate access plan as relates to the ingress for bicycles during gate open hours.
    If this is a designated bicycle access lane then by California law pedestrians are not approved to utilize the lane. (from CVC)
    “(b) Class II bikeways, such as a “bike lane,” which provide a restricted right-of-way designated for the exclusive or semiexclusive use of bicycles with through travel by motor vehicles or pedestrians prohibited, but with vehicle parking and crossflows by pedestrians and motorists permitted.”
    Under California Law bicycles are allow use of the automobile lane even if there is a cycling lane unless this is a limited access highway and posted as such (e.i. freeway)
    “Permitted Movements from Bicycle Lanes 21208. (a) Whenever a bicycle lane has been established on a roadway pursuant to Section 21207, any person operating a bicycle upon the roadway at a speed less than the normal speed of traffic moving in the same direction at that time shall ride within the bicycle lane, except that the person may move out of the lane under any of the following situations:
    When overtaking and passing another bicycle, vehicle, or pedestrian within the lane or about to enter the lane if the overtaking and passing cannot be done safely within the lane.
    When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.
    When reasonably necessary to leave the bicycle lane to avoid debris or other hazardous conditions. (such as a closed gate)
    When approaching a place where a right turn is authorized.”
    It is conceivable that a cyclist rounding that corner behind an automobile will not have time to stop before hitting the gate if closed if that is unexpected and will crash. This scenario convinces me as my required duty as a lab employee to call a stop work on the Grizzly gate usage. Of course a valid solution is to ban pedestrians and keep the bicycle gate open when the automobile gate is open or just allow bicycles to utilize the entrance gate during gate open hours.

  10. ANKaufman says:

    At one point, Barnum noticed that people were lingering too long at his exhibits. He posted signs indicating “This Way to the Egress”. Not knowing that “Egress” was another word for “Exit”, people followed the signs to what they assumed was a fascinating exhibit…and ended up outside.

  11. Arthur Patterson says:

    Paul,

    Right now the new gate and traffic arm are wide open from 6:30 a.m .to 9:30 a.m. because the guard gate is manned. Once the License Plate Reader (LPR) technology is fully functional that will no longer be the case. The gate will be unmanned and the traffic arm will be down (and the gate closed during off-peak hours) unless vehicles are passing through. This is why it’s imperative for cyclists not to follow vehicles in the auto lane and instead use the dedicated bicycle/pedestrian gate.

    We have forwarded your comments to our civil engineer for further assessment.

    If you would like to call a “stop work” on the gate in the meantime, please initiate that request through your manager.

  12. Ron Huesman says:

    Where can we find information on the progress on implementing LPR at the Grizzly Gate. The website at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/ops/site-access/Gate_LPR.html does not seem to have been update in a while.

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