Today at Berkeley Lab

Archives for June 2012

Programmable DNA Scissors Found for Bacterial Immune System

Jennifer Doudna of the Physical Biosciences Division led an international team that discovered a programmable RNA complex in the bacterial immune system that guides the cleaving of DNA at targeted sites. This discovery opens a new door to genome editing with implications for the green chemistry microbial-based production of advanced biofuels, therapeutic drugs and other valuable chemical products. Also on the discovery team were Emmanuelle Charpentier, Martin Jinek, Krzysztof Chylinski, Ines Fonfara and Michael Hauer. More>

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The Higgs Boson: A Tiny Particle Makes a Big Fuss

Very early Pacific Time in the morning of Wednesday, the 4th of July, CERN will release the latest results of the search for the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider. Members of the ATLAS and CMS experiments who are leading the search are still deciding what they will announce. Berkeley Lab has a large contingent of physicists in the ATLAS collaboration, some in key posts. They explain what’s involved in the Higgs search, how to understand the announcement, and what happens after the news breaks. More>

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Berkeley Lab Addresses Supercomputer Energy Measurement

As high-performance supercomputer performance begins to approach the exascale range, the accompanying increase in electricity required to power these computers is motivating developers to produce components that provide higher flops per watt. This improved performance will save both time and computing costs, but how is performance best measured? Several Lab researchers have joined the Energy Efficient High Performance Computing Working Group to develop new methodologies to address this challenge. They include Dale Sartor, Natalie Bates, Erich Strohmaier, and John Shalf. More>

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Discounts on California Shakespeare Shows for 10 or More Staff

The Lab’s Arts Council is looking for groups of 10 or more staff who want to see shows at the California Shakespeare Theater and receive $10 off the regular ticket price. This summer’s offerings include “The Tempest,” “Spunk,” “Blithe Spirit,” and “Hamlet.” Go here for more on these productions. Contact Helen Jefferson to get your name added to the list.

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First 3D Nanoscale Optical Cavities from Metamaterials

Xiang Zhang of the Materials Sciences Division led the creation of the world’s smallest 3D optical cavities with potential to generate the world’s most intense nanolaser beams. In addition to nanolasers, these unique optical cavities should be applicable to a broad range of other technologies, including LEDs, optical sensing, nonlinear optics, quantum optics and photonic integrated circuits. Working with Zhang on this project were Xiaodong Yang, Jie Yao, Junsuk Rho and Xiaobo Yin. More>

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Mentors Sought for Fall Undergraduate Interns

The Center for Science and Engineering Education (CSEE) is seeking mentors for the fall SULI program, which begins August 29 and continues for sixteen weeks through Dec. 14. Applications are currently available online for review. Go here for more information on mentoring or instructions on how to review applicants and select interns. Project descriptions and applicant selections are due Tuesday, July 31. For more information about CSEE internship programs, contact Colette Flood (x2648).

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Carbon Cycle 2.0 Seminar Today on Graphene Nanoribbons

Yuegang Zhang of the Materials Sciences Division will speak at the next Carbon Cycle 2.0 LDRD seminar today at 2 p.m. in Building 15-253. He will discuss “Direct Growth of Graphene Nanoribbons for Large Scale Device Fabrication,” which utilizes direct growth of graphene on silicon oxide substrates with a sacrificial nano-template to promote local growth of graphene via chemical vapor deposition. More>

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Employees Invited to Provide Input on New Publications System

The Scientific Publication Management System — a new institutional repository of the Lab’s publications that will replace the existing reports coordination system — is nearing completion. The goals of the new system are to provide an elegant, flexible repository of the Lab’s scholarly work, as well as a simple, intuitive upload process for our staff and user facility users. The project manager from the open source developer partner will be onsite for four meetings with staff to hear more about their needs from a new reports system today and Friday. Employees are welcome to attend any of these sessions to provide input on the project. More>

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Lab Hosts Emergency Preparedness Fair on July 19

To help employees get better prepared for an emergency, be it earthquake, fire, or hazardous materials spill, the Lab’s Emergency Services Program is sponsoring its 6th Annual Emergency Preparedness Fair. It takes place Thursday, July 19, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on the cafeteria lawn and parking area. Activities include rescue dog demonstrations, raffle prizes, giveaways, and honoring CERT program graduates. Alameda County Fire Department, UC Police Department, American Red Cross and LBNL Emergency Services will have their response and communication vehicles on display. Participating vendors will be selling emergency kits and supplies at a discount, and Bay View Café will be serving BBQ. Contact Sara Wynne (x5861) for more information.

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NERSC Users Generate a Quickest-Ever, 32-Terabyte 3D Simulation

Using NERSC resources, astrophysicists generated a trillion-particle magnetic reconnection dataset in 3D, where each time-step of the simulation amounted to a massive 32-terabyte file. Armed with new tools developed by researchers in Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division (CRD), the scientists were able to query this enormous dataset for particles of interest in three seconds, and visualize it. This is the first time a dataset of this magnitude has been queried and visualized this quickly. More>

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